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  • Swiss Cheese Model - Work Safety Hub
    the tips and tricks to deal with workers compensation reduce your premium and improve productivity Insights Download procedure and risk assessment templates ready for use at work Templates Talk to a certified OHS specialist about your workplace safety obligations Employer Helpline Courses OHS Courses to keep your skills up to date and meet your legal obligations Short Courses Short sharp and easy way to get analysis insights and expert opinion on key developments Briefings Blog About Us Contact Us Recent Searches Anything in here will be replaced on browsers that support the canvas element OHS Business Subscription Trips Chemical Reps Health Violence Bullying OHS consulting Slips exposure Procedures Hazardous Substance Manual Handling Falls Fixed Fee Support View Audits Inspections Short Courses Videos Automation Employer Subscription Subscribe to blog Work Safety Hub The Work Safety Hub blog Subscribe to feed Viewing entries tagged Swiss Cheese Model Beyond Ordinary Part 4 Breaching the Defences Active Failures and Latent Conditions Tweet So if we see the active failures as outcomes of some underlying cause then we can start to say well what are these underlying causes And these underlying causes are generally called Latent Conditions which may result from a faulty design or management decision that may lie dormant for a long time until such time as a correct mix of circumstances lines up and we have an accident Tags Accident Causation Barriers and Defences James Reason Organisational Accidents Safety Science Swiss Cheese Model Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Monday 09 December 2013 Incident Management and Performance Management Beyond Ordinary Part 3 Defences Tweet So your defences and this is consistent with most organisations serve one

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/tags/tag/swiss-cheese-model (2014-01-05)
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  • Incident Management and Performance Management - Work Safety Hub
    reduce your premium and improve productivity Insights Download procedure and risk assessment templates ready for use at work Templates Talk to a certified OHS specialist about your workplace safety obligations Employer Helpline Courses OHS Courses to keep your skills up to date and meet your legal obligations Short Courses Short sharp and easy way to get analysis insights and expert opinion on key developments Briefings Blog About Us Contact Us Recent Searches Anything in here will be replaced on browsers that support the canvas element OHS Business Subscription Trips Chemical Reps Health Violence Bullying OHS consulting Slips exposure Procedures Hazardous Substance Manual Handling Falls Fixed Fee Support View Audits Inspections Short Courses Videos Automation Employer Subscription Subscribe to blog Work Safety Hub The Work Safety Hub blog Incident Management and Performance Management Subscribe to this category Subscribe to feed 12 posts in this category Beyond Ordinary Part 4 Breaching the Defences Active Failures and Latent Conditions Tweet So if we see the active failures as outcomes of some underlying cause then we can start to say well what are these underlying causes And these underlying causes are generally called Latent Conditions which may result from a faulty design or management decision that may lie dormant for a long time until such time as a correct mix of circumstances lines up and we have an accident Tags Accident Causation Barriers and Defences James Reason Organisational Accidents Safety Science Swiss Cheese Model Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Monday 09 December 2013 Incident Management and Performance Management Beyond Ordinary Part 3 Defences Tweet So your defences and this is consistent with most organisations serve one or

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/categories/listings/incident-management-and-performance-mangagement (2014-01-05)
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  • Beyond Ordinary Part 3: Defences - Work Safety Hub
    Work Safety Hub The Work Safety Hub blog Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Monday 09 December 2013 Incident Management and Performance Management Beyond Ordinary Part 3 Defences Tweet So your defences and this is consistent with most organisations serve one or more of the following functions To create understanding awareness of local hazards To give guidance on how to work safely To provide alarms warnings when danger is close To restore the system to a safe state To interpose safety barriers between hazards and potential losses To contain eliminate the hazards To provide a means of escape and rescue should hazard containment fail You can think of defences in depth by the successive layers of protection protecting against failure of the one in front So you have Hard defences Engineered safety features including system design interlocks physical barriers etc PPE Generally some solid matter between you and something else A whole series of Soft defences Legislation including licensing certification etc Rules and procedures Training information and supervision Front line operator The person doing the job Ideally each defensive layer would be impervious But in reality the layers are like slices of Swiss cheese with holes that continually open close and shift location due to changes in situations and people And occasionally the holes line up We have barriers that contain inherent holes and weaknesses some holes are due to active failures and some holes are due to latent conditions which we will cover in more detail in a moment There are a whole series of defences that we have that can include training it can include protective equipment it can include procedures it can include audits it can include supervisors and so on But the problem is that they are all moving around and they change over time so that sometimes the holes line up and we have a problem The defences also breakdown due to changes in personnel changes to processes changes in circumstances you name it there are changes going on all the time Breaching the defences Active Failures and Latent Conditions People contribute to the breakdown of system defences through Active Failures immediate errors and violations also called unsafe acts which may have a direct impact on the safety of the system And here is where a lot of people part company because they basically say oh unsafe acts well if we stop people doing unsafe acts well then we are obviously going to have a safe system and so we will focus on the individuals making sure that they do the right thing all the time Which is fine if you have one supervisor for every individual but if you don t then you are going to have real trouble The other approach is to say why did the people behave the way they did Did they behave that way because

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/entry/beyond-ordinary-part-3-defences (2014-01-05)
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  • Beyond Ordinary Part 2: Organisational Accidents - Work Safety Hub
    model depicted in diagram 1 Most organisations have something like this in place The real problem is that the production process is generally well understood You have so many machines and we put things in the machines and we get things out the other end Or you have somebody behind a counter the more customers that come in the more sales you make Or you have people coming and asking for advice and you give advice and at the end of the day you say you saw 15 clients today That s production It s a production process It is very easy to understand You do more of this and you definitely get more of that But protection needs are different they re much more varied complex and subtle and the level of protection really has to match the level of risk in the organisation It s a question of what is the real level of risk that you are exposed to The law says to provide a safe workplace provide controls commensurate with the level of risk The problem is that the partnership between production and protection is rarely equal 1 Production produces income Outputs whatever is legal currency in your organisation 2 Managers generally come from a production background They know how it works 3 Information on how to improve production is direct You make the machine go faster you get more of something 4 Successful protection is indicated by the absences of losses Very difficult for the production mind to believe 5 Information on protection is indirect and discontinuous All rational managers agree on production and protection being equivalent in the long term It is in the short term that conflicts arise and production generally wins As production pressures increase resources are allocated to achieve this without corresponding margins of protection until an accident occurs The line in the middle of diagram 2 is a balance between doing the right thing and not doing the right thing If you go too far down one end you end up in catastrophe If you spend too much money on protection you go bankrupt Clearly no one wants to be the safest organisation that ever went out of business On the other hand you really don t want to blow the place up and take half the suburb with it either So an organisation might start off and say Yep I have to look after the law I have to comply I have to do all the right things and so I have a good safety system then we run into the GFC and have to cut costs orders are down a bit so we better start trimming some of the systems that we have in place for safety training and we ll postpone replacing that machine Any system that you don t maintain degrades believe or not it s the second law of thermodynamics The same happens with relationships If you don t maintain them they break up If

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/entry/beyond-ordinary-part-2-organisational-accidents (2014-01-05)
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  • Beyond Ordinary Part 1: Organisational Accidents - Work Safety Hub
    blog Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Sunday 08 December 2013 Incident Management and Performance Management Beyond Ordinary Part 1 Organisational Accidents Tweet If we look at organisational accidents in some ways they are completely random in the way that the contributing factors come together to achieve adverse outcomes It is very rare that two accidents are exactly the same There s always something different generally even if it is only the victim that is different But the circumstances that led up to the event are often different However what generally is the same is a whole series of underlying precursors that always seem to point in the same direction with tiring consistency that makes you wonder why do we even bother We re repeating exactly the same things over and over and over again and no one seems to learn These underlying precursors are the organisational conditions that if you can identify and correct you have a higher probability of reducing the chance that those accidents will occur Think of an accident where somebody slipped on the floor and you basically said you should be more careful in the future We need to look at the underlying causes because if we do not find them the whole concept of accident prevention is pure fantasy You cannot control random events The whole concept of random events is that they cannot be predicted It s like saying I have a wonderful system for telling you how to win Tattslotto By definition if it s a true fair system of picking numbers out of a hat it is random you cannot say how it is going to work What you can do is some predictive algorithms that will say there is a higher probability of certain numbers occurring So we re really trying to say how can we make accident prevention a science as distinct from faith or hope A considerable proportion of the work we will reference in this series is based on Prof James Reason s model of accident causation and human error relating to intention planning and outcomes of actions The basic model that Reason uses is a very simple one You have some hazards in place whatever this means it could be flammable materials it could be people stressed because of time frames lack of resources it could be asbestos it could be noise it could be whatever from the whole range of hazards And generally organisations have some defences in place We have hearing protection we have supervision we have training we have procedures etc etc Every now and then these defences fail and you end up with some sort of loss This is a very basic and simple model See Diagram 1 Safety is something generally very difficult to sell to management and in Part 2 we ll explain why Beyond Ordinary

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/entry/beyond-ordinary-part-1-organisational-accidents (2014-01-05)
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  • November & December: Most Dangerous Time of the Year - Work Safety Hub
    Subscribe to blog Work Safety Hub The Work Safety Hub blog Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Monday 02 December 2013 National Statistics November December Most Dangerous Time of the Year Tweet According to a study conducted by WorkSafe Victoria November and December are the most dangerous periods of a year in workplaces As a result Assistant Treasurer Gordon Rich Phillips made an appeal to every Victorian employer and employee to take precautionary measures and extra care during the last weeks going into Christmas Mr Rich Phillips made a comment The festive season is about to begin and Victorians are starting to think about Christmas with their families and friends and relaxing over the summer holidays But we know from harsh experience that when people take their minds off safety they risk a tragedy And we want everyone to get home safely for Christmas The statistics of WorkSafe Victoria further analysed that seven individuals died between November and December This figure is more than double the number of fatalities compared with any two month period last 2012 Meanwhile nine fatalities were recorded between November and December last 2011 all within a six week period Ms Denise Grove WorkSafe Chief Executive believes that Australians minds automatically turn to things other than work as the year end approaches It only means that work safety may be not a priority or worse totally forgotten She added We also know that many fatalities at this time of year involve experienced workers doing routine tasks which suggests their minds may not be fully on the task at hand Together it all adds up to a dangerous mix It has become a tragic news not only for WorkSafe Australia so Ms Grove heightened the alert by saying When a worker doesn t return home safe at the end of the day it is a tragedy for all involved families friends workmates employers and the wider community We want the festive season to be a happy time for everyone So please take care Recap of 2012 Occupational Injury Fatalities Just to review the summary of the findings of WorkSafe Australia in its report Work Related Traumatic Injury Fatalities Australia 2012 Injuries at work resulted in the deaths of 223 workers in 2012 This is similar to the previous two years and represents a significant fall from the 311 deaths recorded in 2007 Over the past 10 years 2 596 workers have been killed while working The 223 fatalities in 2012 equates to a fatality rate of 1 93 Tags Awareness Campaign Holiday Season Workplace Injury Statistics Most Dangerous Time of the Year Victorian Statistics WorkSafe Australia WorkSafe Victoria Subscribe to updates Print Bookmark Related Posts Mark McCabe s Stance on ACT Construction Safety Laws Mark McCabe is currently the ACT Work Safety Commissioner and the senior director of Work Safe ACT the work

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/entry/november-december-most-dangerous-time-of-the-year (2014-01-05)
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  • Awareness Campaign - Work Safety Hub
    Business Subscription Trips Chemical Reps Health Violence Bullying OHS consulting Slips exposure Procedures Hazardous Substance Manual Handling Falls Fixed Fee Support View Audits Inspections Short Courses Videos Automation Employer Subscription Subscribe to blog Work Safety Hub The Work Safety Hub blog Subscribe to feed Viewing entries tagged Awareness Campaign November December Most Dangerous Time of the Year Tweet According to a study conducted by WorkSafe Victoria November and December are the most dangerous periods of a year in workplaces As a result Assistant Treasurer Gordon Rich Phillips made an appeal to every Victorian employer and employee to take precautionary measures and extra care during the last weeks going into Christmas Tags Awareness Campaign Holiday Season Workplace Injury Statistics Most Dangerous Time of the Year Victorian Statistics WorkSafe Australia WorkSafe Victoria Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Monday 02 December 2013 National Statistics Fishermen Training Sessions On Work Safety Tweet New South Wales is slated to conduct a line up of training sessions to be held this week for the South Coast commercial estuary to enhance work health and safety in the fishing industry Tags Agriculture Agriculture Awareness Campaign fishermen Fishermen Training Sessions fishing work safety work safety in the fishing industry Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Monday 02 December 2013 Training and Competence World Diabetes Day 14th November Tweet Diabetes is an epidemic in Australia with significant OHS and financial implications for employers the economy productivity and industry Tags Awareness Campaign Diabetes Diabetes National Statistics Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Thursday 08 November 2012 National Statistics Take10 10 Take time out for safety at work Tweet WorkCover NSW launched a new online competition today to get workplaces thinking about safety in the lead up to Safe Work Australia week Tags Awareness Campaign Occupational Health and Wellbeing Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Friday 12 October 2012 Occupational Health and Wellbeing WorkSafe Heads Up for Sydney Road Melbourne Tweet Heads Up for Businesses in Sydney Road Melbourne WorkSafe is coming to see you Tags Awareness Campaign Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert is the foun User is currently offline on Friday 12 October 2012 Planning Objectives and Legal Obligations Work Safe Week 2012 22 October to 1 November Tweet Work Safe Week 2012 is locked in for

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/tags/tag/awareness-campaign (2014-01-05)
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  • Holiday Season Workplace Injury Statistics - Work Safety Hub
    leaders and experts discuss a range of workplace health and safety topics Podcasts and Videos See how specific industries are performing and gauge how well your business is doing in compassion E books Tools Fast facts businesses need to know about hazards in the workplace Fact Sheets Learn the tips and tricks to deal with workers compensation reduce your premium and improve productivity Insights Download procedure and risk assessment templates ready for use at work Templates Talk to a certified OHS specialist about your workplace safety obligations Employer Helpline Courses OHS Courses to keep your skills up to date and meet your legal obligations Short Courses Short sharp and easy way to get analysis insights and expert opinion on key developments Briefings Blog About Us Contact Us Recent Searches Anything in here will be replaced on browsers that support the canvas element OHS Business Subscription Trips Chemical Reps Health Violence Bullying OHS consulting Slips exposure Procedures Hazardous Substance Manual Handling Falls Fixed Fee Support View Audits Inspections Short Courses Videos Automation Employer Subscription Subscribe to blog Work Safety Hub The Work Safety Hub blog Subscribe to feed Viewing entries tagged Holiday Season Workplace Injury Statistics November December Most Dangerous Time of the Year Tweet According to a study conducted by WorkSafe Victoria November and December are the most dangerous periods of a year in workplaces As a result Assistant Treasurer Gordon Rich Phillips made an appeal to every Victorian employer and employee to take precautionary measures and extra care during the last weeks going into Christmas Tags Awareness Campaign Holiday Season Workplace Injury Statistics Most Dangerous Time of the Year Victorian Statistics WorkSafe Australia WorkSafe Victoria Continue reading Posted by Robert O neill Robert O neill Certified OHS Professional GradDip OHSM GradCert OHS Dip Bus QA CPMSIA RSP Aust Robert

    Original URL path: http://www.worksafetyhub.com.au/blog/tags/tag/holiday-season-workplace-injury-statistics (2014-01-05)
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