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  • About Telstra - Dial Before You Dig - FAQs - Consumer Advice
    Home Our Company Telstra Profile Vision and Mission Executives and Directors Business Units History Tele communications Timeline The Telstra Story Telstra Museums Fast Facts Awards Corporate Governance The Board Of Directors Board Committees External Auditor Internal Audit Management Reporting On Risk Promoting Responsible And Ethical Behaviour Our Remuneration Framework Diversity And Inclusion At Telstra Shareholder Communications Documents and Charters Regulatory Environment Accounting Separation IPND Supplying to Telstra Media Centre Announcements Speeches Reports and Submissions Photos Radio Grabs TV Reel FAQs Investor Centre ASX Announcements My Shareholding Shareholder Updates Become an e shareholder Shareholder Login Shareholder Forms Annual General Meeting Share Price Details Dividends Dividend Reinvestment Plan Share Offer Prospectus Employee Shareholder Scheme FAQs Financial Information Financial Results Investor Day Annual Report Other Presentations Five Year Financial Summary Webcasts Treasury Debt Investors Domestic Borrowings Domestic Borrowings Documentation Foreign Borrowings Foreign Borrowings Documentation Credit Ratings Debt Investor Information Calendar Contact Us Careers Customer Service Approach Customer Service Charter Customer Service Guarantee CSG Universal Service Obligation USO Send us your positive feedback Access for Everyone A Z Products Solutions About the Program Information for Community Agencies Disability Services Disability Products Services Disability Equipment Program Apply for Equipment Additional Products Services Contact Us Accessible Brochures Community Initiatives Action Plan History Useful Links Mass Service Disruptions MSD Payphone Services Telstra s Universal Service Obligation Telstra Smart Payphone TTY Payphones Payphone Enquiries and Applications Siting Criteria for Public Payphones Considerations When Siting a Payphone Removal Criteria Public Consultation Customer Service Network Reports Service Performance Network Reliability Regional Rural Presence Plan National Broadband Network Sustainability 2013 Report About Sustainability at Telstra Responsible business Customer experience Our people Community impact Environmental impact Reports Links Downloads Consumer Advice Mobile Drive Safe In Case of Emergency ICE Mobile Phones and Hearing Aids Mobile Hoaxes Missing Your Mobile Fighting Spam Etiquette

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/dig/faqs/ (2014-01-05)
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  • About Telstra - Understanding EME & Radio Communications - Consumer Advice
    of the spectrum interacts with matter differently For example UV light interacts with matter differently to radiofrequency signals The electromagnetic spectrum has been harnessed to create a wide range of technologies including radio communications television electric power radar microwave ovens magnetic resonance imaging toasters cameras lasers and X ray machines The word radiation often brings to mind radioactive materials and x rays However radiofrequency EME does not behave like the radiation from radio active material or x rays Radiofrequency EME is transmitted by communications systems as radio waves electromagnetic waves that have the capacity to transmit sound music speech pictures and other data invisibly through the air The World Health Organization WHO makes the distinction between different types of electromagnetic energy It is important not to confuse such RF fields with ionizing radiation such as X rays or gamma rays Unlike ionizing radiation RF fields cannot cause ionization or radioactivity in the body Because of this RF fields are called non ionizing WHO Fact Sheet Electromagnetic Fields and Public Health Mobile Telephones and their Base Stations 2000 Further information on the Electromagnetic Spectrum is available from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency ARPANSA Back to top What is radiofrequency EME All radio communications systems use EME in the radiofrequency RF part of the electromagnetic spectrum between 3 kilohertz kHz and 300 gigahertz GHz These include TV AM and FM radio broadcasting mobile phones and their base stations paging services cordless phones baby monitors and emergency and rural communications systems Source http www emfexplained info ID 25186 This picture shows the typical power of the radio services in the community when transmitting Back to top Common Sources of RF EME People have been living with radiofrequency energy in the environment for generations since the invention of the wireless The principles of radio communications and its first technologies date back to the 1880s EME in the Environment This picture is a plot from a spectrum analyser specialised radio measurement equipment showing the various radio communications signals measured in a typical community The plot is taken at one location to illustrate typical radio communication signals present and to make a comparison of signal level This plot shows the environmental EME levels from mobile base stations are similar to other radio services in the community Reference EMF Explained http www emfexplained info ID 25186 how strong are the environmental levels EME in the home Many devices in the home use EME communicate to including cordless phones baby monitors WiFi routers microwave ovens and wireless keyboards Download a poster from the Australian Centre for RF BioEffects Research ACRBR showing EME levels from common devices in Australian homes The illustration above shows the exposure level in close proximity to common devices in Australian homes as a of the public exposure limit 100 the maximum public exposure limit Reference ACRBR survey in Australian homes PDF Baby monitors are also common devices in homes and testing by the Federal Office of Public Health in Switzerland shows

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/understanding-eme/ (2014-01-05)
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  • EME - Mobile Phones & Health - Consumer Advice - About Telstra
    on the WHO website and contains more than 1900 published scientific articles on the biological and health effects of RF EME and more than 630 studies on RF specifically used by mobile networks Steps to reduce exposure to RF EME The WHO provides information on how to reduce mobile phone exposure In addition to using hands free devices which keep mobile phones away from the head and body during phone calls exposure is also reduced by limiting the number and length of calls Using the phone in areas of good reception also decreases exposure as it allows the phone to transmit at reduced power Source WHO Fact Sheet Electromagnetic Fields and Public Health Mobile Phones 2010 More information At Telstra we are committed to providing you with any further updates from the WHO as they become available Telstra takes all matters of safety very seriously and only sells mobile phones that meet national and international safety requirements and standards There are many sources of information on mobile phones and health As well as our web site you can go directly to some of the authorities and organisations we rely on for expert advice or general information WHO ARPANSA EMF Explained You can also check your device manufacturer s handbook guide or web site Or email us at eme enquiries team telstra com How do Mobile Phones Work A mobile phone is essentially a small low powered radio transmitter and receiver which connects to a mobile network to enable telephone calls Mobile phones use radio frequency RF fields to send and receive calls texts emails pictures web TV and downloads An RF signal is sent to the nearest base station which sends the signal to a digital telephone exchange and on to the main telephone network This connects the signal to the receiving phone again via a base station if it is another mobile phone Mobile phones are designed to use the lowest possible power to communicate with the nearest base station and the power is continuously varied depending on the call quality EMF Explained information Mobile Phones and Health Mobile Phone Safety Standard and SAR In Australia the EME safety standard for mobile phones is set by Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency ARPANSA and regulated by the Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA the federal government regulator of the nation s telecommunications industry All mobile phones sold in Australia must comply with the ACMA s Radio Communications Electromagnetic Radiation Human Exposure Standard 2003 The safety standard operates by limiting the Specific Absorption Rate SAR or the rate at which the mobile phone user absorbs energy from the handset The SAR is measured in watts per kilogram W Kg and in Australia the maximum SAR allowable for any mobile phone is 2 watts per kilogram averaged over 10 grams This is the standard recommended by the World Health Organization WHO It is based on guidelines from the International Commission for Non Ionizing Radiation Protection ICNIRP and a careful analysis

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/mobile-phones/ (2014-01-05)
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  • About Telstra - EME Research & Science Monitoring - Consumer Advice
    at that time and were included in the evaluation A concise report summarizing the main conclusions of the IARC Working Group and the evaluations of the carcinogenic hazard from radiofrequency electromagnetic fields including the use of mobile telephones will be published in The Lancet Oncology in its July 1 issue and in a few days online For more information please contact Dr Kurt Straif IARC Monographs Section at 33 472 738 511 or straif iarc fr Dr Robert Baan IARC Monographs Section at 33 472 738 659 or baan iarc fr Nicolas Gaudin IARC Communications Group at 33 472 738 478 or com iarc fr Briefing Audio File About IARC The International Agency for Research on Cancer IARC is part of the World Health Organization Its mission is to coordinate and conduct research on the causes of human cancer the mechanisms of carcinogenesis and to develop scientific strategies for cancer control The Agency is involved in both epidemiological and laboratory research and disseminates scientific information through publications meetings courses and fellowships ABOUT THE IARC MONOGRAPHS What are the IARC Monographs The IARC Monographs identify environmental factors that can increase the risk of human cancer These include chemicals complex mixtures occupational exposures physical and biological agents and lifestyle factors National health agencies use this information as scientific support for their actions to prevent exposure to potential carcinogens Interdisciplinary working groups of expert scientists review the published studies and evaluate the weight of the evidence that an agent can increase the risk of cancer The principles procedures and scientific criteria that guide the evaluations are described in the Preamble to the IARC Monographs Since 1971 more than 900 agents have been evaluated of which approximately 400 have been identified as carcinogenic or potentially carcinogenic to humans Definitions Group 1 The agent is carcinogenic to humans This category is used when there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans Exceptionally an agent may be placed in this category when evidence of carcinogenicity in humans is less than sufficient but there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals and strong evidence in exposed humans that the agent acts through a relevant mechanism of carcinogenicity Group2 This category includes agents for which at one extreme the degree of evidence of carcinogenicity in humans is almost sufficient as well as those for which at the other extreme there are no human data but for which there is evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals Agents are assigned to either Group 2A probably carcinogenic to humans or Group 2B possibly carcinogenic to humans on the basis of epidemiological and experimental evidence of carcinogenicity and mechanistic and other relevant data The terms probably carcinogenic and possibly carcinogenic have no quantitative significance and are used simply as descriptors of different levels of evidence of human carcinogenicity with probably carcinogenic signifying a higher level of evidence than possibly carcinogenic Group 2A The agent is probably carcinogenic to humans This category is used when there is limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals In some cases an agent may be classified in this category when there is inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals and strong evidence that the carcinogenesis is mediated by a mechanism that also operates in humans Exceptionally an agent may be classified in this category solely on the basis of limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans An agent may be assigned to this category if it clearly belongs based on mechanistic considerations to a class of agents for which one or more members have been classified in Group 1 or Group 2A Group 2B The agent is possibly carcinogenic to humans This category is used for agents for which there is limited evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and less than sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals It may also be used when there is inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity in humans but there is sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals In some instances an agent for which there is inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and less than sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in experimental animals together with supporting evidence from mechanistic and other relevant data may be placed in this group An agent may be classified in this category solely on the basis of strong evidence from mechanistic and other relevant data Group 3 The agent is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans This category is used most commonly for agents for which the evidence of carcinogenicity is inadequate in humans and inadequate or limited in experimental animals Exceptionally agents for which the evidence of carcinogenicity is inadequate in humans but sufficient in experimental animals may be placed in this category when there is strong evidence that the mechanism of carcinogenicity in experimental animals does not operate in humans Agents that do not fall into any other group are also placed in this category An evaluation in Group 3 is not a determination of non carcinogenicity or overall safety It often means that further research is needed especially when exposures are widespread or the cancer data are consistent with differing interpretations Group 4 The agent is probably not carcinogenic to humans This category is used for agents for which there is evidence suggesting lack of carcinogenicity in humans and in experimental animals In some instances agents for which there is inadequate evidence of carcinogenicity in humans but evidence suggesting lack of carcinogenicity in experimental animals consistently and strongly supported by a broad range of mechanistic and other relevant data may be classified in this group Definitions of evidence as used in IARC Monographs for studies in humans The evidence relevant to carcinogenicity from studies in humans is classified into one of the following categories Sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity The Working Group considers that a causal relationship has been established between exposure to the agent and human cancer That is a positive relationship has been observed between the exposure and cancer

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/eme-research/ (2014-01-05)
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  • About Telstra - EME - Mobile Base Stations & Health - Consumer Advice
    EME levels measured at Richmond Oval in Geelong as part of the environmental EME testing Radio frequency EME at 57 from AM radio stations was the most dominant signal measured click for larger image Geelong EME Survey pie chart showing the of radio signal levels measured at Richmond Oval in Geelong Geelong survey report PDF 218KB click for larger image click for larger image Point Cartwright EME Survey pie chart above and spectrum plot showing the of radio signal levels measured at Point Cartwright in Caloundra QLD Caloundra district survey report PDF 80KB These local test results are in keeping with the advice of public health authorities on how mobile network base stations compare to other sources of radiofrequency EME in the environment The WHO advises Until mobile phones became widely used members of the public were mainly exposed to radiofrequency emissions from radio and TV stations Even today the phone towers themselves add little to our total exposure as signal strengths in places of public access are normally similar to or lower than those from distant radio and TV stations WHO website fact sheet What are electromagnetic fields typical exposure levels at home and in the environment 2007 The Australian Communications and Media Authority ACMA also puts mobile network base stations into perspective with common sources of radiofrequency energy The EME emission levels produced by 3G transmitters are considered low with an average radiated power of around 3 watts This is significantly lower than the power levels of some other common types of transmitters such as two way radios used by taxis and emergency services ACMA Website Consumer Fact Sheet Electromagnetic Energy and 3G Phones 2007 Information Sources Links Back to top Where Base Stations are Located Base Stations are located in a patchwork of cells across the metropolitan and regional areas of Australia They are located close to mobile phone users to ensure that users can rely on high quality continuous coverage There are currently more than 16 000 mobile network base stations in Australia The number of base stations required to provide network coverage to an area is greatly affected by the number of users in that area In dense urban areas such as a city central business district small micro cell antennas can be located only hundreds of metres apart to ensure that there is enough network capacity to cater for the large number of people making calls on their mobiles at any one time In suburban settings antennas are typically several kilometres apart and in regional areas they can be as much as 30 kilometres apart Some commercial buildings such as shopping centres and office blocks are also fitted with small in building base stations that provide coverage to specifically that building Base stations can be found in just about every urban setting They are located on apartment buildings commercial buildings and industrial estates on existing utility structures such as light poles and high voltage electricity towers on hospitals university campuses shopping centres and corner

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/base-stations/ (2014-01-05)
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  • About Telstra - EME – Wireless Products EME Fact Sheets - Consumer Advice
    Access for Everyone A Z Products Solutions About the Program Information for Community Agencies Disability Services Disability Products Services Disability Equipment Program Apply for Equipment Additional Products Services Contact Us Accessible Brochures Community Initiatives Action Plan History Useful Links Mass Service Disruptions MSD Payphone Services Telstra s Universal Service Obligation Telstra Smart Payphone TTY Payphones Payphone Enquiries and Applications Siting Criteria for Public Payphones Considerations When Siting a Payphone Removal Criteria Public Consultation Customer Service Network Reports Service Performance Network Reliability Regional Rural Presence Plan National Broadband Network Sustainability 2013 Report About Sustainability at Telstra Responsible business Customer experience Our people Community impact Environmental impact Reports Links Downloads Consumer Advice Mobile Drive Safe In Case of Emergency ICE Mobile Phones and Hearing Aids Mobile Hoaxes Missing Your Mobile Fighting Spam Etiquette Recycling Internet and cyber safety Emergency Dial before you Dig Cable Plans Safe Digging FAQs Electromagnetic Energy EME Understanding EME Mobile Phones Health EME Research Science Monitoring Mobile Base Stations Health Wireless Products EME Fact Sheets Information Sources Links RF Map Software Users Information Software Tools Contact Unwelcome Calls Legal Information Call Types Do Not Call Register Contact Us Acoustic Shrieks Thunderstorms Privacy at Telstra Telstra s Privacy Policy Interest Based Advertising 190 InfoCall Asbestos Information Contact Us Request a Speaker About Telstra Telstra Home About Telstra Consumer Advice Electromagnetic Energy EME Wireless Products EME Fact Sheets Information on EME safety relating to Telstra s wireless communication products is provided in the fact sheets listed below BigPond 2 way Satellite Service EME Fact Sheet Installation Guide Assessment Report BigPond 2 way satellite 1 2m dish Fact Sheet PDF 31KB BigPond 2 way satellite 1 2m dish Installation Guide PDF 24KB BigPond 2 way satellite 1 2m dish Assessment Report PDF 588KB BigPond 2 way satellite 1 8m dish Fact

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/factsheets/ (2014-01-05)
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  • About Telstra - EME - Information Sources & Links - Consumer Advice
    Reinvestment Plan Share Offer Prospectus Employee Shareholder Scheme FAQs Financial Information Financial Results Investor Day Annual Report Other Presentations Five Year Financial Summary Webcasts Treasury Debt Investors Domestic Borrowings Domestic Borrowings Documentation Foreign Borrowings Foreign Borrowings Documentation Credit Ratings Debt Investor Information Calendar Contact Us Careers Customer Service Approach Customer Service Charter Customer Service Guarantee CSG Universal Service Obligation USO Send us your positive feedback Access for Everyone A Z Products Solutions About the Program Information for Community Agencies Disability Services Disability Products Services Disability Equipment Program Apply for Equipment Additional Products Services Contact Us Accessible Brochures Community Initiatives Action Plan History Useful Links Mass Service Disruptions MSD Payphone Services Telstra s Universal Service Obligation Telstra Smart Payphone TTY Payphones Payphone Enquiries and Applications Siting Criteria for Public Payphones Considerations When Siting a Payphone Removal Criteria Public Consultation Customer Service Network Reports Service Performance Network Reliability Regional Rural Presence Plan National Broadband Network Sustainability 2013 Report About Sustainability at Telstra Responsible business Customer experience Our people Community impact Environmental impact Reports Links Downloads Consumer Advice Mobile Drive Safe In Case of Emergency ICE Mobile Phones and Hearing Aids Mobile Hoaxes Missing Your Mobile Fighting Spam Etiquette Recycling Internet and cyber safety Emergency Dial before you Dig Cable Plans Safe Digging FAQs Electromagnetic Energy EME Understanding EME Mobile Phones Health EME Research Science Monitoring Mobile Base Stations Health Wireless Products EME Fact Sheets Information Sources Links RF Map Software Users Information Software Tools Contact Unwelcome Calls Legal Information Call Types Do Not Call Register Contact Us Acoustic Shrieks Thunderstorms Privacy at Telstra Telstra s Privacy Policy Interest Based Advertising 190 InfoCall Asbestos Information Contact Us Request a Speaker About Telstra Telstra Home About Telstra Consumer Advice Electromagnetic Energy EME Information Sources Links World Health Organization WHO EMF Project Home Page WHO

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/info-sources/ (2014-01-05)
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  • About Telstra - EME - RF-Map Software Users Information - Consumer Advice
    Foreign Borrowings Documentation Credit Ratings Debt Investor Information Calendar Contact Us Careers Customer Service Approach Customer Service Charter Customer Service Guarantee CSG Universal Service Obligation USO Send us your positive feedback Access for Everyone A Z Products Solutions About the Program Information for Community Agencies Disability Services Disability Products Services Disability Equipment Program Apply for Equipment Additional Products Services Contact Us Accessible Brochures Community Initiatives Action Plan History Useful Links Mass Service Disruptions MSD Payphone Services Telstra s Universal Service Obligation Telstra Smart Payphone TTY Payphones Payphone Enquiries and Applications Siting Criteria for Public Payphones Considerations When Siting a Payphone Removal Criteria Public Consultation Customer Service Network Reports Service Performance Network Reliability Regional Rural Presence Plan National Broadband Network Sustainability 2013 Report About Sustainability at Telstra Responsible business Customer experience Our people Community impact Environmental impact Reports Links Downloads Consumer Advice Mobile Drive Safe In Case of Emergency ICE Mobile Phones and Hearing Aids Mobile Hoaxes Missing Your Mobile Fighting Spam Etiquette Recycling Internet and cyber safety Emergency Dial before you Dig Cable Plans Safe Digging FAQs Electromagnetic Energy EME Understanding EME Mobile Phones Health EME Research Science Monitoring Mobile Base Stations Health Wireless Products EME Fact Sheets Information Sources Links RF Map Software Users Information Software Tools Contact Unwelcome Calls Legal Information Call Types Do Not Call Register Contact Us Acoustic Shrieks Thunderstorms Privacy at Telstra Telstra s Privacy Policy Interest Based Advertising 190 InfoCall Asbestos Information Contact Us Request a Speaker About Telstra Telstra Home About Telstra Consumer Advice Electromagnetic Energy EME RF Map Software Users Information About RF Map RF Map Information Flyer PDF 104KB RF Map Information Posters PDF 583KB RF Map Conference Paper and Sample Reports PDF 1 1MB Price List PDF 105KB Order Form PDF 257KB Patches for RF Map Patch for RF Map

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/abouttelstra/advice/eme/rf-map-software/ (2014-01-05)
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