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  • Telstra - Look Who’s Talking – Public Safety
    Mobile Assets Workforce Network Solutions Network Applications and Services Partners Alliances Security Services Popular pages Internet Direct Office Mobility Whispir Messaging WAN Optimisation Resources Insights Towards a Clever Australia The Overland Office Case Studies Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian Smarter Business Ideas Video Is The New Voice Look Who s Talking Popular pages Whitepapers News Videos Account Services Register Enrol My Account Your Telstra Tools Updating Your Account T Analyst Popular pages Manage Network Pay a bill Mobile Data Usage Meter Switch to email bill Help Support Announcements Brochures Contact Us FAQs Glossary Critical Information Summary Software Downloads TID Technical Information TIPT Resources Why Telstra Popular pages Visit a store Telstra Business Partners Get help with your mobile Resources Insights Telstra Home Business Enterprise Resources Insights Look Who s Talking Industry Resources Public Safety Towards a Clever Australia Compare Your Organisation Reports Enterprise Report Business Report Government Report Industry Insights The Overland Office Case studies Meet the team Case Studies Cloud computing Customer contact centres Customer service Enterprise communications Mobility Network Security Services Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian The Inspiration Clever Australians Australia Post Linfox Komatsu Greyhound Coca Cola Amatil Channel Nine Nissan Leaf M2M Clever Connections Galilee Solicitors ME Bank Arrium Sundale Smarter Business Ideas Video Is The New Voice For Business Managers For IT Managers For HR Managers Look Who s Talking Industry Resources Health Finance Education Manufacturing Retail Media Mining Utilities Government Supply Chain Insurance Public Safety Number of containers in this row 1 Industry Resources Public Safety Number of containers in this row 1 Public Safety Blueprint Telstra s connected vision for public safety organisations Number of containers in this row 1 Public Safety and Mining Cross Industry Innovation Both industries face the forces of nature and the

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/business-enterprise/resources-insights/look-who-is-talking/industry-resources/public-safety/index.htm (2014-01-05)
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  • Telstra Business - Audio Podcasts
    basing myself in Australia for while and she said she thought she could help out with that it turned out that she was Adrian Clark Adrian Clark at the time was the Chair of CSIRO and I knew her only as an excellent scientist with whom I loved to drink a glass of red wine with and talk science at meetings So when I arrive here 17 18 years ago thinking it was for only a one year period Adrian had managed to convince and cajole a little part of CSIRO to give me an office a desk and a bench and I discovered within a year that the quality of science per capita the quality of life with open skies and clear air and the proximity to half the worlds population made it a pretty compelling place to work So we started our institute there we being me at the time and gradually growing up to at least 50 people and being in the same time zone as the majority of the worlds population is not going to change Cameron unless there s a seismic shift that will wipe us off the face of the earth So there s an even more compelling reason to be in Australia than there was 17 18 years ago now that real time communication is so straightforward That said you may ask why Canberra Cameron Reilly laughs Richard Jefferson And you may still ask why Canberra At the time the headquarters of the CSIRO and the National University seemed the logical place to be one can only ask is if it still is Cameron Reilly laughs All right not exactly the answer I was expecting but a very good answer Richard Thank you Thanks for joining us on the show Richard Jefferson It s my delight Cameron I look forward to seeing some of you folks at the Innofuture in Melbourne Close Rob Roe In this podcast Rob Roe further expands on ICT products and solutions to help drive growth in our Enterprise and Government customers including a more detailed look at the integration between Microsoft OCS and Telstra IP Telephony plus his introduction to just what WAN optimisation can do for your business Rob Roe audio podcast MP3 6 52MB Transcript Hugh Liney Okay today we re talking to Rob Roe Director of Product and Services Marketing for Telstra Enterprise and Government Rob tell us why in an economic downturn it s so important for large organizations and companies to seriously consider concepts such as transformation via innovative ICT projects and solutions Rob Roe I think at any time it s actually important for companies to be looking at these sort of transformational opportunities using ICT solutions innovation not just the current climate that we re going through Any time that you can get an advantage if you can improve how you operate how you work how you deliver customer service it is important But it is actually if anything even more important right now and I kind of relate this to the racing car driver slowing down for that corner What s really important as we ve slowed down is your exit speed Now what the driver does what the racing car driver does is set themselves up for a fast exit speed It s all about speed out of the corner to leave the competition behind If you are not working on how can I leverage ICT how can I use innovative solutions now You won t have that exit speed as we all hope as we come out of these times and without that speed you will be left behind If you are losing market share right now you re going to lose even more as you try to you know catch up to the competitors who are just leaving you in their dust Hugh Liney Generally speaking how and why can Telstra help it s Enterprise and Government customers transform their business models future growth v Rob Roe You could say that Telstra s actually living the dream right now You ve seen in the media the written press on TV about how much we are spending in going through our whole transformation program of work which is now four and a bit years under way And what we re doing is we re actually transforming all our back end systems our front of house systems our systems online working with our customers to deliver greater customer service and to be more agile and flexible and so on So we ve actually gone through a lot of experience and we ve had a lot learning in that and we re now bringing that to bear in the solutions and products that we are now bringing to market to our customers Things that are enabling our customers to communicate faster collaborate better both internally and externally to you know cut down the tyranny of distance and time as customers work faster with our customers are going forward Hugh Liney Alright well that s interesting and more specifically about a product tell us for instance about the Telstra IP telephony and its you know great integration with Microsoft s leading desktop solution which is Office Communication Server 2007 or OCS Now that s a very strong alliance Rob Roe It is a strong alliance we announced this in October last year and what we are now seeing is the fruits of that alliance come to bear This is an exclusive for Australia where we have integrated Microsoft Office Communicator Server into Telstra IP telephony and what we re doing and what you can see here is we re linking the phone system to the desktop and so now you know instead of you having to type in numbers etc if you get an email from someone you can actually click on their name do a click to call your phone rings their phone rings you are now connected and that just speeds everything up But it s actually more that that it s what I call we re putting intelligence into voice mail right So today you ring your colleague they are not there you leave a voicemail you wait for them to return and you re not there they leave a voicemail more wasted time With this integration into Office Communicator you can actually see if they are on the phone right now you can actually see you know through connection into their into their calendar whether they re going to be available or when they are going to be available to call them or even if it s a quick query you don t have to call them at all you can instant message them you can ask them the question they can instant message you back you re on with the job your executing it s that whole integration between the phone and the desktop going forward Hugh Liney Now how simple is it though for large organisations and companies to deploy or integrate a solution like this Rob Roe So it s actually very simple because the Telstra IP telephony is a if you like as a service delivered we manage all that we deliver the handsets we set that all up for the customers What they do need is an on premise deployment of Office Communicator server 2007 or 2007 release 2 and then we actually then come in and help integrate that back into and connect that up into the Telstra IP telephony So it s actually very easy to deploy and through our services we can help to get the customers there Hugh Liney Okay nothing to be afraid of there Now also on our topic today is WAN optimisation now Telstra has made a big promise here describing WAN optimisation as enabling LAN or local area network like performance across a wide area network or WAN now is this a realistic promise v Rob Roe Look it is a realistic promise but like a lot of things it also depends The improvement of performance across your Wide Area Network can range from twice as fast to 100 times as fast and it actually gets down to the applications you are running and what you are actually trying to do So for example bandwidth doesn t solve all ills there are certain applications that just benefit out of this world by things like WAN optimisation there are other things where you do need bandwidth The advantage that we bring to the table is we can cover the lot so with WAN optimisation we can get the through put of those applications that benefit greatly from it and we also can provide the network capacity for those that you do need that capacity Hugh Liney Is it possible to briefly summarize what WAN optimisation can do for all our businesses for Enterprise and Government Rob Roe It s how long is a piece of string a little bit from that because you can now start getting that local area network performance on a wide area network scale You can actually start apart from the immediate advantage of better application performance for the end users and there has been study after study on the improvement of that But you can actually start thinking about well how else can I save money What if I was to centralize some of my servers back into our data centre What is that going to save me on terms of operational costs What is that going to save me in terms of deployment of new applications What is that going to save me in my overall operations out into the branches deployment of new apps print file serving it goes on and on and on Hugh Liney Okay that will do for the time being Rob Roe thanks very much So take on board these concepts and ideas products and ICT solutions all in the good and necessary cause of Driving Growth in your company or organisation in good times or bad and sooner rather than later Close Robert Care Chair and CEO of ARUP Australasia Dr Robert Care discusses with Hugh Liney how Australian businesses can get involved in helping disaster hit countries rebuild their infrastructure Dr Robert Care audio podcast MP3 8 64MB Transcript Hello and welcome to Telstra s innovation podcasts a series of conversations with innovators in business and government In today s podcast this is Hugh liney talking to Dr Robert Care who is CEO and Chair of ARUP Australasia He is a adjunct professor of the school of civil and environmental engineering at the uni of NSW a fellow of engineers Australia and a associate fellow of the Australian institute management his commitment to the community id reflected in his appointment in 2006 a director of RedR Australia which stands for registered experts for disaster relief and his appointment as Chair of RedR Australia in 2008 Hugh Liney Robert Care tell us a brief history of RedR Australia and its mission Robert Care RedR Australia was started in 1992 by Jeff Dobell following its establishment of RedR in the UK some years earlier They first saw the valuable contribution that engineers could provide to communities recovering from disasters and alleviating poverty First president was professor Fred Hollows and he challenged engineers to actually apply their ingenuity and resources to relieve suffering wherever it might occur The mission is about providing emergency assistance to communities devastated by conflict or major national disasters by particularly selecting training and providing competent and effective personnel to manage relief programs worldwide Hugh Liney Okay one thing I ve noticed is the RedR register Now can you explain how that works Robert Care We maintain a register of about 400 people at the moment and they include about 50 of those are engineers but they also include people that are skilled in the areas of logistics public health surveying project management and in social areas such as child protection people The register is maintained as people who are available to at relatively short notice suspend their lives postpone their work and actually make themselves available for a three month sojourn overseas Hugh Liney Fantastic I know it s an interesting thing for such an organisation has to sidestep international politics or conflicts and even cultural differences How does an organisation like RedR go about that Robert Care Well firstly we work with United Aids agencies in collaboration with other non government organisations or indeed governments operating in the field Secondly our fundamental principles underpin our work and guide us and they are pretty important to make sure that we don t run in to conflict with organisations we are likely to meet And lastly we make sure that all our people are trained in what we call essentials of humanitarian practice that s cultural sensitivity and the principles that we hold dear Hugh Liney Ok speaking of principles tell us the fundamental principles by which RedR abides Robert Care The principles are as follows we provide suitably trained and experienced personnel to relief agencies in order to assist and to relieve people in debilitating conditions such as when disasters occur The scope is to maintain that register of experienced personnel from which we can draw all those people for those particular skills that are required whatever they might be The third principle is impartiality we do not discriminate on nationality race religion belief gender class or political opinion and that provides a suitable base for our people to understand that We don t take sides neutrality is important we don t take sides or engage in controversies of a political or racial or ideological nature Independence so we may act in a humanitarian service of governments and may be associated with other organisations but we always maintain our autonomy and act in accordance with the principles RedR rather than the principles of the organisation we work with We act voluntarily and we are not prompted or driven by a desire for gain and lastly there s unity there are a number of RedRs around the world we work as one organisation but there might be one or two RedRs in any one particular country at a time there s at least two RedRs in Haiti at the moment for example Hugh Liney That s an interesting case we ll come to or an interesting tragedy we ll come to Can you just tell some of our listeners if you are an Australian worker with the particular skills how does one get to be an aid worker on such a project Robert Care The important thing is to have a specialist skill or experience that s actually useful for people in these circumstances secondly it would be a about coping with unfamiliar circumstances Australian are actually very good at that because of their can do attitude they get on with whatever needs to be done as opposed to necessarily what their assignment might be The ability to work in difficult and often dangerous environment and be able to work in culturally diverse teams and work independently Primarily we cover engineers but we also cover humanitarian aid workers in logistics surveying air operations communications social services and humanitarian coordination Hugh Liney Okay I assume that Haiti we already mentioned but what are some of the key 2009 2010 projects and destinations on the books at the moment Robert Care Well we completed the Maldives project which actually dated back to the 2005 tsunami where we were actually involved in something like 77 projects rebuilding houses and community infrastructure following that tsunami We provided assistance to the Philippines following typhoon Ketsana and that was about rapid logistics and food security we assisted in dispatch of many thousands of tons of rice and food to the people of the Philippines Samoa the tsunami about 6 months in the south pacific destroyed villages we provided assistance to the government of Samoa to define water supply needs and to develop sustainable water supply options We currently have six people in Haiti RedR registered have also been active in Afghanistan Myammar Ethiopia Pakistan the Philippines Somalia Sri Lanka Indonesia and Jordan in the last 12 months alone Hugh Liney Am I out of line in saying that Chile might be a destination as well Robert Care We are looking at Chile as we speak Hugh Liney Tell us some of the Australian companies already involved in RedR Australia Robert Care There are a number of companies involved either providing funding or staff or other support technical back up for deployees and they include companies like Alstrom Areva Aurecon Arup Golder Associates AECOM Sinclair Knight Merz and of course our legal advisers who provide pro bono legal advice DLA Phillips Fox All of those companies are providing us assistance probably under their corporate social responsibility banner Hugh Liney Ok is it available for other companies to join Robert Care We d be delighted for any company that wanted to support us to join us Hugh Liney Well I shall put the details on this podcast so all our listeners can perhaps get in contact Could you tell us a bit about the training process because obviously it s pretty hard once one faces the realities of working in foreign environments Robert Care Once you commit to being interested in RedR we investigate and talk to people very closely we interview them to see that they re suitable for doing this sort of work Once they get past the interview stage we then have two key elements of training The first one is the essentials of humanitarian practice which I have touched on before cultural sensitivity understanding the realities of work in harsh environments and training for carrying out those sorts of tasks the other piece we do is before one gets on the register is personal security and communications learning how to respond to security and safety threats being able to navigate your way cross country using a compass or a GPS machine also knowing what to do if you are confronted with armed militia So those are two pieces that are absolutely essential to what we do and then there s a range of other training that we do such as water and environment sanitation in emergencies humanitarian logistics managing safety and security of staff in the field all of those go to provide a very rounded person that can go out in the field and be operative as soon as they land Hugh Liney Dr Robert Care thank you very much Robert Care Thank you For further info on RedR Australia please visit www redR org au Close Stephen Powell Cameron Reilly interviews Stephen Powell National Demonstrations Manager Telstra Enterprise Government Telstra s Stephen Powell audio podcast MP3 20 61MB Transcript Welcome to Telstra s innovation podcasts a series of conversations with business leaders around innovation in a connected world This is Telstra Today conversations with Telstra in the 21st century I m your host Cameron Reilly Welcome back to Telstra Today I m back down at the Innovation Centre 1010 Latrobe st in Melbourne today with Stephen Powell tell us who you are and what you do Stephen Stephen Powell Well my title I don t like using it that much but my title is National Demonstrations Manager which sounds a very grandiose thing Cameron Reilly Doesn t sound like the sort of title you expect at a telecommunications company Demonstrations Manager sound more like a Myer or a car yard or something what does a demonstrations manager do in a Telco Stephen Powell Well it s got nothing to do with whale hunting or protesting Cameron Reilly Demonstrating Stephen Powell No not those kind of demonstration things no well I work in the Enterprise in Government Space so it s really for our large corporate customers and our large government customers and I work with our sales teams and our product people and that kind of thing In a centre like this we have here at the Innovation Centre and I guess what we re trying to do is help people see beyond what their perceptions are of what technology can do for them I like to sort of think about it think about it as being the ways we sort of plug things together to get new kinds of outcomes Cameron Reilly How long have you been at Telstra Stephen Powell Very good question next week would be ten years Cameron Reilly Wow and have you been in this role for long Stephen Powell It feels like a lifetime it s actually been through various different machinations about 8 years Cameron Reilly Really Stephen Powell Really Cameron Reilly So the reason I asked that is I have spent a bit of time in the Innovation Centre in the lab here at Telstra and I think it s impressive it s an impressive piece of real estate and an impressive piece of thinking and I am wondering how you got here like where was the genesis of building this I have worked in IT for a long time and a lot of hardware companies used to have innovation centres where they rack up massive servers and that kind of stuff but I have never seen anything done in this kind of lifestyle fashion Can you tell us a little bit about the story of the background of the Innovation Centre Stephen Powell Well actually I am probably not the best expert for that there are many other people who were involved in this before I sort of came along it s been I guess in genesis for about 3 to 4 years now as a matter of fact what you are looking at now I guess is the end of the lifecycle for this particular set up that we actually have down here at the moment and in Sydney they have just launched a new one the brand new one which is the Experience Centre Have you been there Cameron Reilly I haven t I got invited to the party but I couldn t make it but I have heard great things about it Stephen Powell I can show you our other Experience Centre in Second Life if you want to see it it is actually a full not quite fully working but it s pretty representational of what the one in Sydney looks like we can have one of what our new one in Melbourne will look like in June Cameron Reilly Ok excellent Stephen Powell We have three of them one in Melbourne one in Sydney and one in Second Life Cameron Reilly We should put an SL URL link there in the show notes go check it out when it s live Stephen Powell It s not quite open yet with that one but we are happy to do that probably in the next couple of weeks Cameron Reilly Well by the time this goes out it will be good we ll put it up Ok So Stephen Powell Oh sorry you were asking about where do we go How did this come to be Cameron Reilly Yeah Stephen Powell I think it was a reflection of what a lot of customers see when they come here for the first time which is this is one of the few areas where they actually see what Telstra means in the one spot they always sort of think of Telstra as being this nebulous cloud thing which is partly because our sales people like talking about clouds and drawing clouds on white boards and all that kind of stuff so it always becomes something quite ethereal It s very difficult and nebulous to try and conceptualise and the endeavour for this place was to actually to try and put everything in the one spot that would allow people to actually get the impression of Aha to sort of understand why networks and the services that come through networks are important to my lifestyle Cameron Reilly Because Telstra s obviously a multi faceted beast these days and it has so many product lines and so many divisions that I guess it s probably difficult even for people working inside of the company to get the full picture of it let alone those of us on the outside The Innovation Centre the thing that I like about it is that when I m here it not only helps me understand the sort of technologies that you have available today but it s inspirational in many ways Are you trying to build a vision inside the minds of your customers of what they could do with technology if they were really to go out on a not on a limb but really try and apply everything that s out there today Are you using The Innovation Centre to meet current demands or to build future divisions for future demands Stephen Powell I hate to say it but it is all of the above for that but I guess as a minimum if someone left here and just thought about having just done a session here or gone for a tour around some of the areas that are relevant to them if they just sort of left here and thought about if I just speak to my salesperson or walked into a shop and bought a few extra things off the shelf as it were and plugged them together I could get more a lot out of what I ve already got then that s I guess what the big picture is for why we actually run these kinds of things Besides actually having a physical centre like this I also get involved in a lot of large events trade shows corporate hospitality and so forth where we for example the Commonwealth Games the FINA World Swimming Championships various different stuff where we ve actually had major involvement with those world wide events and in both cases of those two sort of international things we had centres sort of set up like miniature versions of these but closer to where the venues are as well and it never ceases to amaze me that people sort of come in and they sort of think Oh yes I ve seen all this and you say Well let me just show you one or two things For example in one case just recently back in March there was somebody I think I actually had a white board and I tallied up how many new things that I showed them from the moment they walked in and they said Oh yes I ve seen all that and we got up to ten things that they owned stuff and they didn t even know that it did some of the stuff that it did So they sort of had to go away and think Wow I should go and speak to some more people about why I m not doing those kinds of things and it is both because we have to work in the corporate layer we cover both the top ends very sophisticated communications and unified collaboration type tools out there but we also brief those same customers with regard to what consumers are doing and the consumer of course are their constituents they re their customers they are also their employers and so forth as well So we need to be able to go through every layer down to I was listening to one of your podcasts recently about what your kids do online for example and it s relevant to me because we need to be able to tell our corporate customers as to what the next generation of users coming through and what it is that their expectations are going to be so there s no beginning or no end it s what we have to cover in these kinds of centres Cameron Reilly And one of the things I like about this is the way that you have called it an Innovation Lab or an Innovation Centre and I think I have said a few times to people in Telstra honestly when I think of Telstra the word innovation doesn t usually come to mind although I know that over the 100 plus year history of Telstra Telstra probably has done a lot of innovation but the public perception of Telstra isn t you know the same as an Apple maybe in terms of innovation but I think it s interesting in terms of the culture here now if you are talking more about innovation you re perhaps building that more into the culture of Telstra and from the outside we re starting to see more of that In terms of Telstra and innovation when you have customers come into the lab are you finding that they are excited about the things that Telstra are doing from an innovation perspective after they leave more than they were when they came in Do they see you more as an innovator rather than just somebody who owns a network Stephen Powell It s really about I guess sparking ideas in their head in terms of having them come here We aren t selling anything here there s nothing you can buy here at all Cameron Reilly It s more about ideas Stephen Powell It is more about ideas and starting a conversation and seeing where that goes after that we can only sort of do so much in here after that we have our sales people our solutions architects and so forth who go away and then actually start sitting down and sometimes customers may come back again There may be a whole lifecycle where they sort of start off with something and keep coming back over time With different kinds of people inside an organisation wanting to sort of get some more understanding or perhaps even prototype something here as well because we have a vast amount of connectivity and so forth and a vast amount of devices and computing power and so forth we can throw at something for that so they can quickly put something together and then show their stake holders as to what the potential of something is But in the end though it really is about Sorry I have forgotten what we were talking about Cameron Reilly Well we were just talking about the perception of Telstra as an innovator in the minds of people who come in and I guess one of the questions I was going to ask around that is you know the world is changing very fast and you and I were talking before we started recording about how there are so many things changing very fast in the shape and role of a telecommunications company that it s got to be very difficult to see ten years down the track I think in some ways and you were talking before about my kids and their approach to telecommunications and data and information is going to be so different than ours is when they re our age you know we have to read science fiction I think to really grasp how they re going to be perceiving it Stephen Powell I think they are already way ahead of it already from what I heard of yours they are way ahead of it to tell you the truth right now in terms of how they are looking at using networks broadly as a communications tool where our generation and earlier generations think of communications being something you do on a telephone a wireless telephone a mobile telephone for example Where they re getting into I think one of your children was talking about buying a Billy cart on Ebay or something or other they were talking about Cameron Reilly Oh they buy lots of stuff on Ebay Stephen Powell And so forth so in terms of building networks of friends and that kind of thing that they are likely never to actually physically meet at all they are very much tapped into that kind of thinking and so forth so as you talked about sort of people thinking is Telstra very innovative I think Telstra strangely enough has been very entrepreneurial both positively and negatively some people may think that it s hard to grasp Cameron Reilly It is that s not a word that we associate with Telstra At least pre the current administration Stephen Powell Sure I think there have been lots of initiatives to grow in lots of areas and quickly adapt something and go and put it out into the market place and away we go the problem has been that all these things have been incredibly siloed and the reality is the world the IT industry people who use IT whether they knowingly or don t knowingly use IT and they are expecting things to actually interconnect and inter work together and I think that s kind of the big shift and I think also from what we were talking about innovation just taking things of the shelf The implication for that is that they also should be able to talk and work together as well and give a lot more synergy together than the individual parts have been in the past So I think that has perhaps the shift from being the let s just throw stuff out there and see if it floats because the buzz word in Wide magazine or on some other sort of influential website to where now Well we have these core competencies and you know we have these things that actually all talk a similar common language for example what can we do to actually add some extra functionality onto that and try and innovate from that faction Cameron Reilly Oh Yeah you know one of the frustrations that I have with telecommunications as it is today and this is not just directed at Telstra Stephen Powell This term I think is going to be going away Cameron Reilly Telecommunications Stephen Powell Yes Cameron Reilly What will we call it do you think Stephen Powell Well I just think it more about what we do you know and I think it s one of the themes I want to try to get to today but we sort of you know we are having this communication right now you re sitting in front of me and nodding politely at some of the things that I am sort of saying and so forth and we re interacting and so forth but then at the same time I was speaking to you earlier on the phone for example that was a different kind of experience and I was emailing you and you were emailing me and I was ignoring you while I was away on leave during Christmas and that kind of thing I think some of those barriers between those different kinds of communications are coming down and I think your children for example and generations coming through won t be thinking so much in the future about what should I do now to contact you it s going to be very much a unified environment both from a work point of view as well as from a what happens after work as well I m afraid positively or negatively as well We ll just live and some of it s going to be happy fun combining kinds of things and some of that may be involving what you do in terms of what pays your wage some of it s going to be what you do as a hobby when you interact with people as well so it s all one big other than sleep where I

    Original URL path: http://www.telstra.com.au/business-enterprise/resources-insights/audio-podcasts/index.htm?page=6 (2014-01-05)
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  • Telstra Business - Audio Podcasts
    long time Terry Paroz I have I ve been here for 21 years last month which is fantastic Cameron Reilly That s outstanding isn t it Terry Paroz It is it s a fantastic organisation Cameron Reilly What was your first job at Telstra 21 years ago Terry Paroz I joined as I was part of ten people that came we were the first externally recruited sales people into the organisation and that was back 1986 so I came in as a sales person My very first training course was actually how to learning how to read the tapes on a Telex machine Cameron Reilly Explain what a Telex machine was for people under the age of 40 Terry Paroz It s probably really only one step removed from Morse code It was a method of communication essentially point to point where the information was punched in not on a keyboard but was actually punched in I m just trying to explain how it s a little bit hard to explain for somebody that wasn t around in those days Cameron Reilly My only recollection is my first job in Melbourne in 88 at a bank an American bank and they had this literally like a lab with guys in white coats and you would hand write a message on a piece of paper put it in their in tray they would take it into the magic room out the back and send it overseas Was this because it was supposed to be cheaper than international telephone calls Was it more secure Terry Paroz It was actually a legal document so Telex was classed as something that could be used in a court environment and in fact I was only made aware last night that some people in the travel industry still use telex Cameron Reilly So it s still out there Terry Paroz Very very few but yes I was made aware that an airline company is actually still using telex Cameron Reilly Wow so it s sort of got supplanted by fax and you ve seen Telex the fax and now you re selling voice over the Internet that s a big jump in 20 years Terry Paroz It is and you know it s been fantastic from a data perspective I remember many years ago the first iteration of email we had an internal system called keylink and it used to run at 300 board speed so that was 300 bits per second and we thought that that was amazing that you could send a message type a message to somebody in another part of the company Cameron Reilly Yeah I remember the early days when I setup email for a company I was working with in the early 90s and it was only a small business but to communicate with other people we got a quote for like a ten thousand dollar email gateway that you need to get installed to be able to pass one version of email to everyone else s versions of email Terry Paroz Yeah and today on every device you ve got you know instant messaging msn those types of things Cameron Reilly Are you seeing the rise of real time video communications much I m starting to see it a lot with my peer group particularly now that laptops all seem to have cameras built in to them Video calls seem to be coming a lot more popular than they ve been over the last 5 to 10 years are you seeing that in the Enterprise space Terry Paroz We are and that will continue to grow because I think the quality of video is also improving significantly so whilst you ve got laptops being built now with the cameras inbuilt you know for 129 you can also get a clip on camera through to the USB port and it significantly changes it s a much richer experience so rather than just have one sense a telephone call being able to introduce that second sense of the physical and the visual significantly changes the experience and our customers and even ourselves internally now will use video much more often it s a standard process these days Cameron Reilly So getting back to the 21 years at Telstra what are some of the biggest changes you ve seen at Telstra in the last 2 decades Terry Paroz When I started we didn t actually have computers we had a Rotodex which is where all of the customer s cards were kept Cameron Reilly What s a Rotodex Terry Terry Paroz It was just a multistorey filing system round and all of our customer or subscriber cards as they were called in those days were kept on that Our records were based on people s telephone numbers Where we re at today it s sorry what s some of the other changes we had 94 000 people when I joined the company today we ve 34 000 and much more efficient We re no longer a government owned organisation we re privately owned oh sorry we re publicly listed and you know the pace of the organisation is significantly different What our focus is you know I think our focus is crystal clear everybody in the organisation knows where we re going knows what our goals are And I think I honestly believe everybody gets out of bed everyday wants to come to work and make a difference it s a great place to be Cameron Reilly What do you think the public perception of Telstra is Is there anything that you hear out in the public that you think is just wrong Terry Paroz There is and I think that there is a lot of nonsense that s written in the paper particularly by some journalists that quote unnamed sources you know that s just I think it s irresponsible and it s wrong and I find it quite frustrating But you know the other side of that is that why would we give those people the power to actually disrupt us from what we re doing we have a very clear goal and we will be we are the best media communications company in Australia and our goal is to provide you know fantastic service for our customers and great shareholder returns Cameron Reilly If anyone listening wants to get more information on your Unified Communications products where do they find it Terry Paroz They can find it on the Telstra Enterprise and Government website Cameron Reilly Thanks Terry Terry Paroz Thank you Close Tim Harcourt Austrade s Chief Economist Tim Harcourt aka The Airport Economist talks to Hugh Liney about some small positive indicators that are appearing during this tough period time of economic downturn and swine flu Tim Harcourt audio podcast MP3 8 43MB Transcript Welcome to Telstra innovation podcasts A series of conversations with innovators in a connected world In this leaders speak series this is Hugh liney talking to Tim Harcourt Chief Economist at Austrade and author of The Airport Economist Hugh Liney Now you ve penned a piece just this week here we are in early May round about budget time and it s very positively headlined Are These The First Signs of the Great Recovery now it may not be apparent to all what signs of great recovery have you noticed that might be of interest to our business listeners Tim Harcourt Well I ve covered myself like a good economist Hugh and I have got a question mark on the title but you know last week was an interesting week I mean I spent Monday night with the treasury secretary looking at the budget and of course the reduction in commodity prices has impacted revenues as we know we re going into deficit but by Friday when I was at the Reserve bank there d been so much good data during the week that people were now instead of talking about the great recession they were talking about the great recovery And we got very good news from China their stimulus package of course they don t have to put it through parliament do they it just goes straight into the economy Hugh Liney Good point Tim Harcourt That s been chugging away very nicely particularly in the second and third tier cities in the west Hugh Liney That s Particularly good for us isn t it Tim Harcourt Well that s infrastructure and construction so that s good Secondly we received very good trade numbers the second highest surplus on record 2 5 billion dollars are export the volumes are relatively unscathed and this is at a time when you think about it we have had a 30 reduction in trade around the world yet Australia s exports are holding up reasonably well And look it might be that in the downturn all the economies Japan and Korea Singapore that produce a lot of heavy industry a lot of consumer durables they have been hit pretty hard while Australia our mining and farming old economy structure that we ve been worrying about we have been doing reasonably well Hugh Liney So they re all good signs Tim Harcourt So that was good retail sales were strong now some people think that s the bonus some people think it s not but the retail people I spoke to last week were very strong very confident that things were quite good And then of course the labour force numbers it s typical every month but what we found in the latest labour force numbers is that for April we actually had a gain in employment of 27 000 49 000 gain in full time jobs so that was a much stronger result than we expected Hugh Liney That was the grand surprise of the month wasn t it Tim Harcourt That was I mean monthly data moves around and there s difficulties with the surveys so it could still be a technical issue but when you look at some of the confidence surveys that are coming out now the NAB business survey and so on they are quite confident the calls we ve made to businesses around Australia to not sacked people right now because you are going to need them in the recovery perhaps have been heeded and we ve noticed in our own data that exporters on average tend to hold on to their workers and proved more job security so it might be a wise move if we re bouncing back And then finally we had a quite important speech by the San Francisco head of the Fed Dr Jay Gillen who is a very able person who basically was talking about the US recovery you know reasonably confidently so it was quite a week and I think that s one reason why the reserve bank said the labour market the trade numbers the business surveys are quite strong and it could be that we ve been through the bottom and now we re moving into recovery although a slower recovery than can be expected all things considered Hugh Liney All right that s good to hear you re cautious but positive words We talked a lot about Asia there now remembering the Asian economic crisis it was the late 90 s what lessons do you think Australian business has learnt or should be learning in the export market from that Asian downturn Tim Harcourt Well I think the most important message probably goes to the great recovery I mean things can bounce back pretty quickly in the Asian financial crisis we had the devaluation of the Thai Baht and capital outflow in most of those economies You know contagion very quickly but by 99 they had all bounced back very quickly and the lessons of Australian exporters at that time was that those who stayed through and through thick thin and the markets were well looked after when they recovered You don t want to be a carpetbagger and nick off when the economy is weak for a year they wont let you back in Hugh Liney Still speaking of lessons to be learned from history you know the headlines are screaming epidemics at the moment now the SARS epidemic of course in 2003 and surely it had some pertinence to the potential effects of the so called Swine flu on the current economy and trade again is there anything businesses learn from the SARS precedent of some years ago Tim Harcourt It s gone from SARS to swine in only a few years pigs can fly Hugh Liney In no time at all Tim Harcourt Well what s interesting is I think what we ve learned from SARS is that the fear of SARS was bigger than SARS itself there were disruptions to transport and tourism numbers fell by 8 but they bounced back very quickly And perhaps what we ve learned particularly here at Austrade is that when clients can t travel for one reason or another we can maintain relationships with their business partners and we learned that from SARS and we ve probably got a lot of techniques for dealing with an epidemic now with the Swine that we developed during SARS The interesting thing about SARS I mean that was our major trading partners it was Singapore Hong Kong serious stuff and it hit Toronto but it was really Asia now swine is Mexico so far but you know is a bit of scrutiny around the world but you ve got to watch that But I think the world economic the world trade outlook was downgraded but the IMF because of SARS but they probably found they had overshot a bit so that s probably good reason for us to be a bit a little bit more relaxed about Swine than we were although you know health wise you ve got to watch it Hugh Liney Reading your regular features on the economist corner Tim I noticed that you ve got a headline that made my ears stand up and I thought how can Harcourt explain this one this time You ve got one that says exporters make better bosses please explain Tim Harcourt Please explain famous words well you know I was an ACTU research officer before I was with Austrade and back then and work that we ve done we looked at how do exporters perform as employers in the labour market compared to other businesses And on average we find they pay higher wages they provide better heath and safety more employment rights for women and more job security and we ve found this was across industry and across firm size and I think we re starting to see that in the slow down in the sense that exporters are holding on to their workers because when the recovery comes they will need them Hugh Liney Okay interesting point Just to continue the positive talk today a change from the last three months Tim Harcourt It s been a while hasn t it Hugh Liney Yes A lot of our audience is medium size businesses overall what do you think the confidence is like in that scale of business as far as exports are concerned and is there overall positive perspective you can put on business and export outlook for medium size businesses Tim Harcourt Well it s been tough we have had the majority SME s when you look at revenue and for the first time the Sensis business index shows that exporters are having a harder time than other firms at the medium end so that s something to watch but what is good news is that they are staying in the export game they know it s going to be hard and it s been pretty tough in the UK US and even New Zealand where a lot of them obviously go But they ve actually found they are sticking in there and as per the Asian financial crisis if you stay in when it bounces back you are the first cab off the rank We ve found with respect to China and India medium size businesses who export are actually doing quite well there so perhaps the emerging markets is still a happy hunting ground despite the global turmoil that we ve seen Hugh Liney That s good thank you very much Tim Harcourt Tim Harcourt Great to be with you Hugh Close Tim Harcourt Tim Harcourt from Austrade has some more joyful end of year economic thoughts for Australian business and government which he shares with Hugh Liney Tim Harcourt audio podcast MP3 9 25MB Transcript Hugh Liney Talking to Tim Harcourt Chief Economist of Austrade Today we re talking at the end of December there been some better economic news so we thought we would do a round up of the last 6 months in the economy and in the trade situation Now Tim Looking back at a year of international let s just call it you know GFC wreckage tell us why Australian export volumes and other economic indicators have fared comparatively or sometimes very healthily Tim Harcourt Well you got to say this time last year we were talking about the great recession 2009 is the great escape And next year is the great recovery and I think there are three reasons for it One is I think the Hawke and Keating reforms of opening up Australia meant we were more resilient Secondly more short term I think the stimulus package obviously helped we went early went hard and went households And that s obviously had an important effect And I mean our export sector has been extremely strong in a world where it s been trade Armageddon and trade volumes world trade volumes have fallen by 20 Australia s actually had positive growth on our export volumes so the export of community have been a remarkable bench head against the storm around us So a good year for Australian exports and therefore a good year for the Australian economy all things considered Hugh Liney Interesting to hear The Chinese economy how much has its inherent strength meant to us here in Australia Tim Harcourt Well you know Ben Benecke s been talking about green shoots I think probably bamboo shoots are more appropriate Here in Australia you know China we ve been hugging the panda in many ways not just at the Adelaide zoo and China now accounts nearly for over three billion dollars almost 15 of our total trading goods and services You put Japan China Korea and India the big four from Asia and you ve got nearly half our exports and certainly I think the Chinese government said we want to ensure that there s stimulus we want to ensure that s there stimulus in our second and third tier cities not just Shanghai Beijing and Guangzhou so the smaller cities well I say small but they are 8 million people some of them some country town And of course that s had a big impact here in Australia Hugh Liney That s interesting When you talk about our exports but I believe that besides our mineral and physical exports there are also services and other growth areas that china looks to us for Tim Harcourt Yes interesting the I was in Guanling this year and the internal tourism market in China is talking off as incomes grow and Australia provides a lot of that service a lot of that infrastructure our education sectors is obviously very important in China s Financial services are growing as China has to do something with all of the reserves that it has and things like architecture you see the water cube at the Olympics of course Hugh Liney Of course Tim Harcourt But all around smaller cities in China the second and third tier cities chances are the airport the gymnasium the library the civic buildings have probably been designed by an Australia architect so I think it s a really a services story as much as a rocks and crops Hugh Liney Okay Now we ve been emphasising China and rightly so but tell us also about the importance of Japan Korea North Asia and others Tim Harcourt Well of course I was in Japan about a month ago and Japan hasn t had the financial crisis that the US and the UK has Principally because they went through a lot of their barbells and financial difficulties before and it s still a very rich society We re finding from an Australian point of view the investment from Japan has been very important here in Australia very important for Australian jobs but the investment throughout East Asia by Japanese companies still goes on and still drives that global supply chain So in many ways Japan s relationship with Australia is very mature now it s not just minerals and g s and important as that is it s right throughout right throughout the region Korea well Korea is the IT hub isn t it and anything you do in Korea just takes off I ve been talking with the broadband segment people and Korea Australia New Zealand often form alliances on it so Korea certainly does very well Hugh Liney Gee Topic of the moment as well is of course Copenhagen what about Australia considerable extensive exports capability you ve mentioned there is quite some capability in key in environmental and green areas Tim Harcourt That right I was in Copenhagen this time last year Bit of a cheaper hotel rate 12 months before though copped 15 of course Hugh Liney Good thinking Tim Tim Harcourt But I was actually at an energy camp put on by the Danish government and Australia was the only foreign delegation invited It was basically Denmark s internal decision making for cop 15 and they wanted to hear from Australia Because since we ve signed with Kyoto since we ve played a very prominent role on the world s stage in terms of environmental issues people are interested in our green technology everything from our green building to recycling renewable energy earth wind and fire the work of the roaring 40 s people do I mean all that architecture around china has been done on very high environmental principles So I think its very exciting area obviously there s political economy to work through with climate change but from an export point of view our clean energy section has been very very strong here Hugh Liney That s interesting and you make a point in your writings that climate change policy in fact is for some people have previously argued that climate change policy in fact is different from trade policy why is multi lateralism essential in this area Tim Harcourt Well you see with trade policy I mean we reduced our tariffs we did it ourselves and it benefited our consumers and our workers and our own firms we could have done that no matter what the world did with trade and obviously always better if everyone s is doing it Climate change is very different it s a bit of a prisoner s dilemma you cannot act totally alone you can show leadership you can take a position to the negotiating table but climate change is as Nicholas Stern said is the worlds biggest externality So it affects us across borders whether we like it or not so it s fundamentally different and I expect it s going to be quite a challenge Hugh Liney You bet on a very Australian nationalistic note lets talk sport Tim Harcourt So we should Hugh Liney I think we should It s often used as an Australian flagship for business and export how important is it really we ve got The World the Cup we ve got Aussie Rules even cricket to an extent has been used as an accidental tool of international diplomacy Tell us about your views on sport and its use in business and Australia exports Tim Harcourt Yes interesting you mentioned cricket after we had the under arm with Trevor Chapell we signed a New Zealand Australia free trade agreement Hugh Liney Just like that Tim Harcourt So just after Bolly Line we ve obviously done a lot more with India Look I think sports is part of our brand it s how the world sees Australia in many facets So I think it s a good thing to use as leverage to show if we re good at sports we are also good at the arts we re good at technology and we re good at other things So I think it s a nice opener particularly in certain countries there s a fair bit of evidence now that when you hold the Olympics and you do it well you boost your country s profile you also manage to bring a lot of business people along and get them to schmooze and mix and match for the first time and for a small operator like an architect wanting to go to China chances of us getting them next to a major official from China or Singapore at the Olympics is easier than doing it any other way and we estimate about 1 7 billion dollars of trade investments since the Sydney Olympics has come out of business club Australia So it gets runs on the board even in New Delhi for the Commonwealth games next year we ve estimated about 45 million dollar so already from 27 business that have set up in India so the Commonwealth games will be important Obviously Aussie Rules we re talking that to Shanghai in 2010 and the World Game I mean South Africa no better vehicle for world trade that the World Game Frank Lowy has obviously played a very important role with our business club for football and if you think about it Frank Lowy getting us in to Asia you take those top nations in Asia our top trading partners the top Asian football confederation you are talking 42 billion dollars worth of trade So a very great opportunity as Australia becomes you know an emerging player in the world of football Hugh Liney Oh well go the Aussies in more ways than one Tim Harcourt That right Hugh Liney Tim Harcourt Chief Economist of Austrade and author of the Airport Economist thank you very much Tim Harcourt Good Thank you Close Tim Harcourt Hugh Liney speaks with Tim Harcourt the Chief Economist at Austrade and author of the hit book The Airport Economist Tim Harcourt audio podcast MP3 8 39MB Transcript Welcome to Telstra s innovation podcasts a series of conversations with Australian innovators and business leaders in a connected world In this series People Planet Profit this is Hugh Liney talking to Tim Harcourt the Chief Economist at Austrade and author of the hit book The Airport Economist Hugh Liney Welcome Tim and for our podcast today obviously here we are late October going into November Why is it your view that Australia s export diversity is a favourable factor as we face this global financial crisis Tim Harcourt Well you know we used to talk about as Geoffrey Blaney said the tyranny of distance how far we were from most markets the US and Japan and Europe and so on but I think since the float of the dollar by the Hawke Keating government and the reduction of tariffs and the move toward Asia it s now the power of proximity that matters And we re the lucky country But we have made our own luck because we reformed ourselves exactly when Asia became an important part of the world And when you look at the IMF forecast of where global growth is going to be the lion share is outside the G7 in China in India Asia Hugh Liney Yep Tim Harcourt Middle East Latin America basically where our trading partners are now So by luck and by design our export diversity in the emerging part of the world is very important Hugh Liney Well it s a positive thing to hear I noted that you have recently used the phrase animal spirits now tell us about those origins but besides export diversity why else is Australia well placed to overcome the global economic conditions at the moment and also those animal spirits that are at work in the economy Tim Harcourt Well of course animal spirits was phrase that John Maynard Keynes made about the psychology of markets and when you look at the global credit crunch you have to be a chief psychologist now more than an economist because it doesn t suit the economic fundamentals but just once markets get a run on off they go and that s the amazing thing about capitalism I suppose Hugh Liney Mmm Tim Harcourt But I think you re right export diversity is important so we re well placed around the world Secondly we ve done a lot of our own reforms in Australia I mean with Banana Republic and the Asian financial crisis we ve also had issues with the state banks in Victoria South Australia and so on and I think we ve learnt from some of those financial reforms So that when we ve had the Asian financial crisis ten or eleven years ago and now the I guess you d call it the Euro American financial crisis we re in better shape because your institutions basically get wetted through experience and our cental bank our financial institutions our own balance sheets our own banks are in good shape and that will be important to weather the great storm upon us Hugh Liney That s great nonetheless you as Austrade s Chief Economist must have some real concerns on the export front Are there real concerns for us to be worried about Tim Harcourt Oh look I do I mean I think there s an external shock like we have seen no one can be immune and already Russia and even some of the east Asian countries have been very careful you saw the dare I say it melt down in Iceland Hugh Liney Laughs Tim Harcourt And some of the issues with Hungary so you know financial shock no ones immune One thing that s important and where the animal spirits come in we anticipated a reduction in Chinese growth before the financial shock And so when you see changes in Chinese industrial production you see some falling in commodity prices that was anticipated But you know in the media and so on of course people see it in the context of panic in financial markets and I think it s important to separate the events China wants to move from being export dependant to running on consumption and investment and moving wealth westward and I think that was going to occur anyway but people see everything through the lens of financial contagion and animal spirits Hugh Liney Ok well said Look here we are again just for the podcast I m saying here we are in late October early November Australia is in the middle of a great test cricket series in India at the moment you ve recently visited India and I believe Adam Gilchrist the recently retired wicket keeper batsman and Vice Captain also has in his role as ambassador for the university of Wollongong actually tell us about our cricket teams and Australia s closer understanding of India there s a link I think Tim Harcourt Yeah it s an important point I think we used to describe the Australian Indian relationship as the three C s cricket curry and commonwealth but business wise there wasn t much going on in India but I probably in 1991 there about you know Steve Waugh s interest in India followed by Adam Gilchrist Brett Lee and so on probably these new generation of cricketers see India as just a great place to go And whilst in the 70 s and 80 s Greg Chappell would just stay home and let Kim Hughes take the reigns and I think you see a bit of a sea change in business as well business now sees India as a very interesting market for Australia Hugh Liney As far as that is concerned for business where are our trading patterns heading with India Tim Harcourt Well I think we ve seen huge infrastructure investment that s meant the Snowy Mountains people Leytons has got more going on in India now than they have in China Hugh Liney Really Tim Harcourt So I think India s young population so many people under 25 and the good gender balance means that you know Gloria Jeans and Cookie Man and even Andrew Gaze not a Cricketer basketball he s done very well in the Indian market So I think demography sometimes is destiny it s not everything but it makes a big difference Hugh Liney That s great You wrote an article Who wants To Be A Trillionaire with Col Porter inspired I suppose in brackets Can China Save The World You discussed this inevitable question about whether China can save the world s economy Tell us about China s realistic role in the world s economy and how it might be changing Tim Harcourt Well look it s emerging and it s playing an important role particularly in manufacturing What I said in the article as well you know China will certainly help Australia particularly given current circumstances in the global environment But people underestimate how much China has to do internally itself you know joining the world trade organisation making those reforms freeing up the labour market so people before couldn t move from the provinces into Shanghai for instance And so I said in the article you know can China save itself let alone save the world We know that China has to play a role in the recovery in the global economy we know China has to play a stronger role international financial institutions and in the trading system but we shouldn t underestimate how much China has got to do Hugh Liney Ok will they be particularly helpful to Australia more than anybody else Tim Harcourt Well I think so given our export links with China and now our foreign direct investment links with China I think China is sort of holding us up I think to some extent probably China and India the emerging markets is a good story for Australia and I think you know our close relationship between Mandarin speaking Prime Minister Kevin Rudd and China is helping We did a survey at Austrade of how many business thought their prospects in China were improved since the election of Kevin Rudd and 42 said that it s a real business impact from it so I think that s something to have in our favour at the moment Hugh Liney That s good all Hail the Chief and may we cross our fingers that those relationships absolutely prosper Now in your recent book The Airport Economist as you travel the worlds economies you talk a lot also about small and medium Australian business exporters as well as the bigger business some of these podcasts do go to that level of business Tim Harcourt Fantastic Hugh Liney Especially the mid sized business Tim Harcourt Fantastic Hugh Liney What are some of the observations you can now make about the variety of business and export successes around Australia Tim Harcourt Well what s interesting take the example of China more small and medium business now export to China than to the whole of Europe outside

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  • Fire and Rescue NSW blazes backup trail
    be surprised if we have to use it Mark Jones Tell me about the networks themselves How have you made decisions about what s the best type of network to use Richard Host Well at the moment our fire stations run on ADSL2 which is excellent That s backed up by 3G We actually dispatch by satellite so even if the town got completely cut off we could still ring those bells and the crews go out Mark Jones How many people in the organisation are you looking after Richard Host In Fire and Rescue there s 13 000 people of which 7000 are volunteers Fire and Rescue also supports the whole emergency services sector There s 95 000 people in that Mark Jones Tell me about the Google Chromebox What are you doing there Richard Host Well this is really good We re deploying Google Chromeboxes which look like PCs for all intents and purposes They smell like PCs but they re an awful lot faster instant considerably cheaper very very fast As a consequence we think that they will replace a lot of PCs out in the fire stations Mark Jones They re a network device aren t they So what implications does that have for your networks Richard Host Well what it means is the network has to be up So that s why we have redundant networks everywhere I think that s the way things are going There s almost nothing that you can do these days unless you re doing a PowerPoint or a Word document that doesn t need the network So our emphasis moving forward is to have more resilient and faster networks Whether you ve got a tablet device or a Google Chromebox or just about anything you have to be connected Mark Jones Security is clearly very important when you re running a large complex network like this What steps have you undertaken to make sure that everything is as it should be Richard Host Well security is of course very important for an emergency service With bring your own device it s becoming increasingly more complex We ve attained ISO 27001 security certification which has brought along a lot of process improvement We do make sure that no one can actually connect to our network unless we ve checked out their device Mark Jones You mentioned to me that you re rolling out some iPads as well testing those in the organisation Richard Host Yes Mark Jones How do you secure those Richard Host How do we secure those Well they come in through a Telstra private network so they never actually touch the internet so it s very secure Mark Jones You ve come from the private sector and you re now obviously in the public sector What s your advice to other CIOs and people in your position who deal with a large organisation like this and have to get things done Richard Host Well when I came

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  • Balancing Risk and Benefit: Is Cloud that Risky?
    Collaboration Customer Contact Solutions Industries Industry Solutions Digital Media and Content Services Managed Data Networks Mobile Assets Workforce Network Solutions Network Applications and Services Partners Alliances Security Services Popular pages Internet Direct Office Mobility Whispir Messaging WAN Optimisation Resources Insights Towards a Clever Australia The Overland Office Case Studies Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian Smarter Business Ideas Video Is The New Voice Look Who s Talking Popular pages Whitepapers News Videos Account Services Register Enrol My Account Your Telstra Tools Updating Your Account T Analyst Popular pages Manage Network Pay a bill Mobile Data Usage Meter Switch to email bill Help Support Announcements Brochures Contact Us FAQs Glossary Critical Information Summary Software Downloads TID Technical Information TIPT Resources Why Telstra Popular pages Visit a store Telstra Business Partners Get help with your mobile Resources Insights Telstra Home Business Enterprise Resources Insights Videos Towards a Clever Australia Compare Your Organisation Reports Enterprise Report Business Report Government Report Industry Insights The Overland Office Case studies Meet the team Case Studies Cloud computing Customer contact centres Customer service Enterprise communications Mobility Network Security Services Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian The Inspiration Clever Australians Australia Post

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  • Matching the Cloud Provider to your Business Requirement
    Communications Collaboration Customer Contact Solutions Industries Industry Solutions Digital Media and Content Services Managed Data Networks Mobile Assets Workforce Network Solutions Network Applications and Services Partners Alliances Security Services Popular pages Internet Direct Office Mobility Whispir Messaging WAN Optimisation Resources Insights Towards a Clever Australia The Overland Office Case Studies Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian Smarter Business Ideas Video Is The New Voice Look Who s Talking Popular pages Whitepapers News Videos Account Services Register Enrol My Account Your Telstra Tools Updating Your Account T Analyst Popular pages Manage Network Pay a bill Mobile Data Usage Meter Switch to email bill Help Support Announcements Brochures Contact Us FAQs Glossary Critical Information Summary Software Downloads TID Technical Information TIPT Resources Why Telstra Popular pages Visit a store Telstra Business Partners Get help with your mobile Resources Insights Telstra Home Business Enterprise Resources Insights Videos Towards a Clever Australia Compare Your Organisation Reports Enterprise Report Business Report Government Report Industry Insights The Overland Office Case studies Meet the team Case Studies Cloud computing Customer contact centres Customer service Enterprise communications Mobility Network Security Services Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian The Inspiration Clever Australians Australia

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  • Beyond Cost Control: The Business Value of Cloud Services
    Customer Contact Solutions Industries Industry Solutions Digital Media and Content Services Managed Data Networks Mobile Assets Workforce Network Solutions Network Applications and Services Partners Alliances Security Services Popular pages Internet Direct Office Mobility Whispir Messaging WAN Optimisation Resources Insights Towards a Clever Australia The Overland Office Case Studies Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian Smarter Business Ideas Video Is The New Voice Look Who s Talking Popular pages Whitepapers News Videos Account Services Register Enrol My Account Your Telstra Tools Updating Your Account T Analyst Popular pages Manage Network Pay a bill Mobile Data Usage Meter Switch to email bill Help Support Announcements Brochures Contact Us FAQs Glossary Critical Information Summary Software Downloads TID Technical Information TIPT Resources Why Telstra Popular pages Visit a store Telstra Business Partners Get help with your mobile Resources Insights Telstra Home Business Enterprise Resources Insights Videos Towards a Clever Australia Compare Your Organisation Reports Enterprise Report Business Report Government Report Industry Insights The Overland Office Case studies Meet the team Case Studies Cloud computing Customer contact centres Customer service Enterprise communications Mobility Network Security Services Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian The Inspiration Clever Australians Australia Post Linfox

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  • Episode 6: Enterprise-grade Customer Service
    Collaboration Customer Contact Solutions Industries Industry Solutions Digital Media and Content Services Managed Data Networks Mobile Assets Workforce Network Solutions Network Applications and Services Partners Alliances Security Services Popular pages Internet Direct Office Mobility Whispir Messaging WAN Optimisation Resources Insights Towards a Clever Australia The Overland Office Case Studies Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian Smarter Business Ideas Video Is The New Voice Look Who s Talking Popular pages Whitepapers News Videos Account Services Register Enrol My Account Your Telstra Tools Updating Your Account T Analyst Popular pages Manage Network Pay a bill Mobile Data Usage Meter Switch to email bill Help Support Announcements Brochures Contact Us FAQs Glossary Critical Information Summary Software Downloads TID Technical Information TIPT Resources Why Telstra Popular pages Visit a store Telstra Business Partners Get help with your mobile Resources Insights Telstra Home Business Enterprise Resources Insights Videos Towards a Clever Australia Compare Your Organisation Reports Enterprise Report Business Report Government Report Industry Insights The Overland Office Case studies Meet the team Case Studies Cloud computing Customer contact centres Customer service Enterprise communications Mobility Network Security Services Audio Podcasts Videos Whitepapers NEXT Newsletter The Clever Australian The Inspiration Clever Australians Australia Post

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