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  • Beaded Sioux ‘Strike A Lite’ bag circa, 1890’s. | Four Winds
    Old Pawn Rings Earrings Necklaces Bracelets Cuffs Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us Other Beaded Sioux Strike A Lite bag circa 1890 s 28 Cross Street Double Bay Sydney Australia T 61

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/artwork/beaded-sioux-strike-a-lite-bag-1890s/ (2016-02-10)
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  • test | Four Winds
    Belts Pins Pendants Other Old Pawn Rings Earrings Necklaces Bracelets Cuffs Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us test test 28 Cross Street Double Bay Sydney Australia T 61 2 9328 7951 F

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/artwork/test123/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Old wooden box’s with compartments, ideal for curio display. | Four Winds
    Pawn Rings Earrings Necklaces Bracelets Cuffs Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us Interiors Old wooden box s with compartments ideal for curio display 28 Cross Street Double Bay Sydney Australia T 61

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/interior/old-wooden-boxs-with-compartments-ideal-for-curio-display/ (2016-02-10)
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  • An old wooden writing slope box, circa 1925 – Complete with internal leather writing slope and hidden trinket compartments and brass hardware. This writing box was a gift in honour of Cheif Deputy U.S. Marshal – George H. Burnham. | Four Winds
    Old Pawn Rings Earrings Necklaces Bracelets Cuffs Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us Interiors An old wooden writing slope box circa 1925 Complete with internal leather writing slope and hidden trinket compartments and brass hardware This writing box was a gift in honour of Cheif Deputy U S Marshal George H Burnham 28 Cross Street Double Bay Sydney Australia T 61 2

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/interior/early-horn-hide-stool/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Old Mesquite hall table with three drawers & forged iron handles, built on early mesquite oxen yokes. Height 31″ Length 60″ Width 18″ | Four Winds
    Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us Interiors Old Mesquite hall table with three drawers forged iron handles built on early mesquite oxen yokes Height 31 Length 60 Width 18 28 Cross Street

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/interior/old-mesquite-hall-table-built-on-early-mesquite-oxen-yokes/ (2016-02-10)
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  • Early crude ranch chair. Height 26″ Width 17¼” & 13½ deep. | Four Winds
    Pawn Rings Earrings Necklaces Bracelets Cuffs Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us Interiors Early crude ranch chair Height 26 Width 17¼ 13½ deep 28 Cross Street Double Bay Sydney Australia T 61

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/interior/early-mexican-wood-chest/ (2016-02-10)
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  • 2016 – ELLE – JANUARY | Four Winds
    Other Old Pawn Rings Earrings Necklaces Bracelets Cuffs Belts Pins Pendants Other Artwork Paintings Sculptures Textiles Other Publications Interiors Exhibitions Contact us prev next Elle Magazine 2016 January 2016 28 Cross Street Double Bay Sydney Australia T 61 2 9328

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/publication/2016-elle-january/ (2016-02-10)
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  • A&A Sept-Dec.2011 The Beauty Of Turquoise | Four Winds
    carvings and was considered a pioneer in the carving of turquoise and coral He was one of the most well known Zuni jewellers of his time He tended to use more blue green turquoise rather than the lighter blue and carved in this material because of its softness and ability to be shaped into an animal Teddy Weahkee 1890 1965 was another very well known and highly collectable Zuni fetish carver who also loved turquoise His carvings in turquoise are more angular than those by Leekya Among the Indians of the Southwest turquoise was used for religious and ornamental purposes and for the Navajo turquoise jewellery was passed as currency This jewellery is known as Old Pawn Even before pawn became part of the pueblo economic system turquoise and silver were part of the barter system among the Zuni Hopi White Mountain and Jicarilla Apaches Navajo Ute Havasupai and Walapai The Apache believed turquoise would help warriors and hunters to aim accurately and liked to attach a small piece to the bow so the arrow would fly true Turquoise was so highly valued by the Zuni that a string of turquoise beads could have been worth several horses In Zuni tradition the rich blue colour of the stone symbolises the supreme life giving power Fragments of turquoise are used for the eyes of fetishes and are commingled with sacred cornmeal and presented as an offering to masked deities Most tribes believe that turquoise brings good fortune energy healing protection and ensures a long a life of health and happiness hence its age old popularity as a personal ornament Turquoise has been part of the Native American tradition for centuries Some of the world s finest and most beautiful jewellery is produced in Arizona and New Mexico Turquoise was and is so popular to use because it occurs naturally near the surface of the earth making it possible to obtain with primitive tools Secondly it is soft therefore easily worked into distinctive shapes while the colour reflects things that the Native Americans admired the most sky and water Pueblo Indian legend says that turquoise steals its blue colour from the sky When the Navajos first began setting it in silver it was relatively scarce even in the Southwest and the call for it by Indians and later tourists led to the reopening of a number of dormant mines Reopening is the correct term as most of the mines which are worked today are known to have been worked by the prehistoric Indians Turquoise is never faceted as it is opaque A lot of the best contemporary turquoise is nugget style baroque and not ground to any conventional gem cut There are two reasons for this the first being economy Since turquoise crumbles easily in grinding there is less wastage in nugget cuts and the process is not as time consuming Another reason is that nugget cuts work better with the free form silver work that is most characteristic of contemporary jewellery

    Original URL path: http://www.fourwindsgallery.com.au/publication/the-beauty-of-turquoise/ (2016-02-10)
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