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  • Looking for Loopholes | designplace
    beyond Michael Russum described many carpark structures as seeming to deify the car With this Avenue de Chartres carpark the appearance and planning redress the relationship between vehicles and pedestrians The hit and miss walling hides the cars and their supporting structure while the plan layout provides pedestrian paths free of moving cars that link to the main path running the length of the hit and miss wall This wall and the circular stairwells behind are built with local soft orange coloured bricks laid as hit and miss brickwork up to a solid parapet where the pattern of the perforations is continued with dark blue bricks The pattern of perforations and blue bricks slope in the direction pedestrians walk to Chichester Cathedral The hit and miss wall ventilates the car park while at night lighting filters out through the hit and miss wall Lessons from the sub continent Laurie Baker 1917 2007 was a British born architect who earned world renown for the thousands of appropriate buildings he designed in his adopted country of India His brick building used passive environmental design techniques well ahead of their time These buildings cost surprisingly little to build and operate even in Indian terms Indeed his ability to design with such economy put him out of favour with well off clients One technique he consistently used was hit and miss brickwork or jali walls Baker advocated replacement of most or all windows with brick jali walls Perforations in the wall performed the functions of a window view out privacy within security light without glare and ventilation If insects birds or small animals were a problem an appropriate metal mesh screen could be built into the jali Baker used these jails on houses churches cafes and commercial buildings He maintained rightly that a section of jali wall was 10 percent of the cost of a glazed window and in the balmy subtropical climate of southern India was more appropriate In many northern costal climates of Australia similar weather conditions suggest we could adopt some of Baker s ideas Notes on detailing and laying Hit and miss brick or block walls can be built with extruded or cored blocks but traditionally they are built with solid pressed bricks or solid blocks When using pressed bricks the question of laying them frog up or frog down arises In Australia most pressed bricks are laid frog down and this is recommended for hit and miss walling In Britain where frog up is used pressed bricks generally have wider deeper and longer frogs that require frog up laying for structural integrity As only a portion of a brick s bed will carry the load in hit and miss construction it is important the bricklayer use a stronger stiffer mortar mix for that part of the wall relative to the mortar mix used for normal full stretcher bond walling Where the usual mortar may be 1 1 6 cement lime sand for hit and miss mortar a stiffer 1

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/looking-for-loopholes/ (2016-04-29)
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  • In Profile With Elvis & Rose | designplace
    find in Sydney and Melbourne than in their home town We spoke to two architects about their Elvis Rose experience The duo recently completed an extension to an Art Deco house in the Brisbane suburb of Coorparoo which included an elevated deck Shane and Rese were really key in resolving the details and working through some of the trickier structural details says Nick Tyson of Phorm Architecture Design We don t usually work much with brick but they opened our eyes to the potential and the possibilities and the aesthetic of brick Nick often runs into Shane and Rese in West End and there s always a quirky brick detail not too far away that they want to show us For Jayson Blight a director of Brisbane s Cox Rayner Architects working with Shane and Rese on an extension to his classic Queenslander was also a first I ve actually never worked in brick before he confesses I have always wanted to do a building in brick but we come from more of a steel and glass background The manly brick extension doubles the floor area of the Blight s 1890 s timber house Hit and miss brickwork enables the extension to be built to the boundary while allowing light and ventilation Some of the brickwork we are doing is incredibly light and delicate the way it works as a screen Jayson explains He found the collaboration with Shane and Rese to be an unexpected reward They are fantastic guys and their knowledge of brickwork is just amazing It s opened my eyes for sure and you don t get that often in architect builder relationships Shane and Rese consider that the concept of touching the earth lightly popularised by Glenn Murcutt has had an inordinate influence on contemporary architecture in Australia and the proliferation of steel timber and glass structures While both endorse respect for the land they feel it is also important to consider a building s legacy and to take a whole of life approach to its occupancy Both consider there are challenges in the industry especially a loss of skills and a lack of knowledge about the potential of masonry They have encountered risk averse engineers who resist opportunities to exploit the material s strength in load bearing situations or try new things with bonds They also believe that student architects are not learning how to detail in masonry a contention supported by Jayson Blight who says the only thing that I was taught in the late 80s and early 90s was how to detail a brick fireplace Both Shane and Rese would like to see suppliers do more to support up and coming designers with incentives and study bursaries to inspire them to rethink what they know to be a versatile and character rich material They believe there is a hierarchy in trades with wet trades in particular being looked down upon The dirtier you get the less respect you are shown and believe more

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/in-profile-5/ (2016-04-29)
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  • How to Choose Bricks With Austral Bricks | designplace
    of what a showroom can look like You will discover how easy it is to choose and order your bricks Customers typically come in with little understanding of what it means to choose exterior colours for their home Transcript If you want more information about choosing the colour of brick to suit your home then make sure to leave a comment below and we will reply back Tweet Want more inspiration Just enter your email to receive it Brickworks Building Products Part of the Brickworks Limited Group Brickworks Building Products is one of Australia s largest and most diverse building material manufacturers Under the Brickworks Building Products umbrella are some of Australia s best known building materials brands Our products include bricks pavers masonry blocks retaining wall systems precast concrete panels concrete and terracotta roof tiles timber products and specialised façade systems Recent Posts Architect Spotlight Drew Heath Clayfield House Richards Spence Newfarm Residence Paul Butterworth Architect Leave a Comment Cancel reply Connect with us Just enter your email to get Free Blog Updates Popular Posts Architect Spotlight Stephen Varady 21 Jan 2016 Architect Spotlight Drew Heath 19 Apr 2016 Inner City Chic 12 Apr 2012 Want to see Amazing

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/how-to-choose-bricks/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Retail Therapy | designplace
    the reason was because council were interested in articulating the building form to reduce the building s perceived bulk Spence explains However the council was also looking for articulation of the material and the proposed sole use of off white clay bricks Bowral Bricks Charolais Cream dry pressed clay bricks met with some resistance from planners who felt its aesthetic was too singular They resisted the use a single material over the whole building but we were a bit stubborn in that regard says Spence That s part of the reason for the brick screens which articulate the surface But the other reason is that they allow views to the street from the first level offices behind the screens Spence is a keen proponent of masonry use in south east Queensland a controversial view in a state well known for its use of lightweight construction He contends that masonry construction whether brick or block is widely used in other countries on our latitude with similar climates and that the widespread use of timber cladding in that state is historical When Brisbane was developing timber was the cheapest material available Richards and Spence also value the familiar modularity of the brick the scale of which relates to the individual as much as to the environment The off white brickwork wraps around all sides of 19 James Street and into the central arcade which allows access to the upstairs tenancy and public toilets The arcade also facilitates pedestrian access from this and neighbouring buildings to the rear car park The retail tenancies continue along the north west side of the building We took advantage of this side to construct a covered outdoor space that some of the tenants are using as external dining That s been well received Due to site constraints the rear facade carries only service cupboards and loading bays The use of off white bricks was Spence s way of easing acceptance of masonry in a hot climate He references Palm Springs the upmarket Californian desert community as an example We thought a darker brick maybe red or brown would have been a bit too civic in its palette for a shopping and restaurant precinct he expands and that the off white brick lightens the mood a little and was more appropriate to these kind of recreational uses It also provides a further context for the palm trees The off white bricks blend smoothly with large areas of glass concrete and black steel The upper level brick screens are a signature element of the building Also known as hit andmiss brickwork this technique has been widely used for centuries especially in hot climates where it is used for ventilation The combination of tall three course misses and an unrestrained top edge prompted Scott McDonald of structural engineers Sheehy Partners to specify T shaped steel reinforcement to be embedded in each continuous course beneath the openings Sheehy also did the structural engineering for the remarkable three sided brick screen that

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/retail-therapy/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Peak Performance | designplace
    amount of solar energy absorbed by a product and solar reflectance the amount reflected are interlinked That is if 20 percent of the solar energy is absorbed then 80 percent must be reflected The absorption and reflectance of roofing materials has also been compared at the Florida Solar Energy Center which measured the performance of different materials of similar colours The tests compared a white barrel style concrete roof tile with a standard white standing seam metal roofing sheet Concrete roof tiles again proved to be the superior performer reflecting 7 8 percent more energy than an identically coloured metal roofing product This has important implications in the design of so called cool roofs which are discussed in the sidebar to this article Thermal efficiency keeping a lid on costs The selection of a roofing material can have a critical impact on the temperatures inside a house and the consequent level of artificial heating and cooling Research conducted by the University of Newcastle s Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment has established that concrete roof tiles offer superior thermal performance in hot conditions The tests compared a concrete tiled roof to a sheet metal roof both without sarking and took note of the amount of cooling energy required to maintain a comfortable temperature in living areas The research went further and compared light and dark coloured roofing in both materials to determine if this had any bearing on the results What is clear from the results is that while a lighter coloured roof offers a marginal difference in heat absorption due to reflectivity the material itself had a greater bearing and in this regard concrete roof tiles were the superior performer The bottom line A roof does have a lot to carry wind loads weathering and even fire As this research demonstrates a tiled roof can carry its environmental load as well as whatever else nature can throw at it Solar Reflectance Solar Gain the Cool Roof Controversy It s well known that the colour of an object influences its surface temperature and the amount of heat it will absorb A black car left in the summer sun will be hotter to touch than a white car The material being heated also influences its response to temperature Recently the City of Melbourne sponsored testing at The University of Melbourne into cool roofs the proposition that a roof treated with a cool roof paint CRP will reduce heat gain into a building and therefore reduce energy consumption You can read the full report at www melbourne vic gov au Sustainability CouncilActions Documents Cool Roofs Report pdf Although the benefits have been simplistically touted as paint your roof white and your cooling bills will go down the report is more circumspect For example the use and location of insulation is very influential If the insulation is moved from on the ceiling to under the roof i e from being between the roof space and the habitable room to being between the roof

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/peak-performance/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Survival of the Fittest | designplace
    architects are reinterpreting many of these ideas in interesting ways Today s designers however are facing the fresh challenge of climate change and the important role that housing design and material selection can make The environmental potential of bricks can be maximised if their thermal mass is designed for comments sustainability architect Scott Willey With brick s ability to store warmth and coolth building bricks into the interior can help make us more comfortable at home by evening out day night swings in temperature This means warmer winter nights and cooler summer days To boost this effect allow low angle winter sun into the interior on sunny days In summer the sun should be excluded Opening windows overnight when the air is coolest usually the hours after midnight allows for the stored heat to be purged Of all the material choices wall selection accounts for 60 to 70 percent of the thermal mass of the building with the floor largely accounting for the balance Generally the more thermal mass the better A well designed double brick or masonry home on a concrete slab offers the highest potential comfort benefits and energy savings The architectural community has long understood the changing nature of the city to a denser more design conscious urban centre To meet this evolving need the brick industry is changing not just its products but the way it does business Melbourne s population growth and the growing awareness that we need to live within the existing infrastructure footprint has led to densification of the inner city a pattern that is being repeated in Australia s other capital cities Retro fitting and reworking infill sites is big business Inner city local government authorities have recognised that housing demand can be met by rethinking many of the underutilised undeveloped sites or redundant light industrial sites To meet the challenge of growing from a city of three million people Melbourne for example is undergoing a complete renaissance to one of potentially eight million by 2080 more akin to major European cities such as Barcelona or Berlin Four architectural responses A series of clever projects have been designed by leading architects who have demonstrated foresight in not only meeting the challenge of a changing city the demands of designing for climate change and affordability but also making buildings of real civic meaning McBride Charles Ryan s recent AIA award winning Penleigh and Essendon Grammar School project is a striking building in itself However what is not commonly appreciated from the glamorous photos is that this project has very clever passive design features that are intimately linked to a major architectural feature a black glazed brick wall The extruded silhouette is an amorphous cloud like form that allows the internal spaces to be passively cooled by drawing in air from the south façade and expelling hot air through a thermal chimney thereby creating a source of light and a means of naturally ventilating the classroom spaces Principal design architect Rob McBride and interior

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/survival-of-the-fittest/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Harnessing The Sun | designplace
    brickwork The report notes that insulated cavity brickwork construction provided the most consistent and predictable behaviour of any of the wall types When air conditioned this construction required less energy to keep it within the comfort range This is linked to the ability of the internal brickwork skin to assist in regulating temperature Brick veneer Often thought of as merely cosmetic brick veneer offered a heat lag of four hours and when insulated has been shown in the research to provide an improvement in thermal comfort over that of lightweight construction Brick veneer was shown to have high summer temperatures though adding cavity insulation helps reduce these Adding internal thermal mass can also improve this performance Reverse brick veneer Often thought of as the holy grail in building the brick veneer is placed on the inside where it can be best utilised to regulate thermal comfort Testing showed the performance of insulated reverse brick veneer was marginally inferior to insulated cavity brickwork due to the lack of thermal mass in the external skin It was more vulnerable when exposed to high solar gain than insulated cavity brick which required less energy consumption under controlled conditions Lightweight timber framed construction While insulation in lightweight walls reduces the amount of heat flux through external walls the lack of significant thermal lag means peak internal temperatures will more closely follow external conditions Of the four wall constructions tested the lightweight assembly had the highest daytime peaks and the widest divergence in daily internal temperatures Even though the lightweight wall has a higher R value than the insulated cavity brick the lack of thermal mass means decreased comfort levels for occupants And when air conditioned the lightweight test building consistently had the highest energy consumption The inability of lightweight construction to store heat means it is unable to store overnight coolth to assist in moderating summer temperatures Maximising comfort with brick Designers may not control the energy used by appliances in the home directly although through good design they can offer a significant improvement in thermal comfort for the life of their buildings Increasing internal thermal mass The thermal capacitance of bricks can be used with greatest effect in climate zones that have large diurnal temperature shifts The Newcastle research highlights the value of insulated cavity brick construction to produce the most stable thermal comfort of those tested The housing market has traditionally favoured brick for its appearance and low maintenance though this is often achieved with brick veneer at lower cost The goal for designers who wish to increase energy efficiency is to maximise internal mass where passive design will allow this mass to moderate temperature Building internal partition walls of brickwork particularly in and adjacent to the living areas of the building where most heating and cooling loads are incurred can give a boost to energy efficiency By comparing constructions of hybrid wall types the research showed that significantly improved thermal performance could be achieved Insulated walls The Newcastle research illustrates the

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/harnessing-the-sun/ (2016-04-29)
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  • In With The Old | designplace
    awaits this splendid new project currently under construction on the south side of the Tate which will present a striking combination of the raw and the refined found industrial spaces and twenty first century architecture There are many fine elements to the design of this project The façade will use brick to match the surface of the existing structure while creating something radically new a perforated brick lattice through which the interior lights will glow in the evening Windows and the terrace will appear as cuts in the brick surface The building will rise 64 5 metres above ground in 11 levels its height responding to the iconic chimney of Giles Gilbert Scott s power station The use of brick is not cool which is the reason we jumped on it for a project like this because it meant this building would stand alone says Jacques Herzog If the Turbine Hall was the defining emblem of Tate Modern s first stage the vast oil tanks at the base of the building will become as closely associated with the new building These raw industrial spaces will retain their rough edged atmosphere to become an unforgettable performance and exhibition venue Beautiful new galleries displaying the collection will have a greater variation of sizes and shapes than the original museum and there will be a larger space for temporary exhibitions Tate Exchange will enable groups to exchange skills and ideas there will be new seminar spaces and a cutting edge Media Lab Social spaces will include a new Members Room a Level 10 restaurant and a public terrace on Level 11 all with outstanding views across the capital The new building will also be a model of environmental sustainability setting new benchmarks for museums and galleries in the UK It will draw much of its energy needs from heat emitted by EDF s transformers in the adjoining switch house With a high thermal mass frequent use of natural ventilation and utilisation of daylight the new building will use 54 percent less energy and generate 44 percent less carbon than current building regulations demand A public walkway through the building will make possible a direct route from the City to the heart of Southwark There will be two new public squares to the south and west of the building To the east a new planted area will be created Substation Utility Building Another fine project completed early in the London Olympics program is the Substation Utility Building for London s Olympic Park by Glasgow Architects NORD Architects winner of the prestigious RIBA Awards for Architectural Excellence In 2007 NORD were appointed to work with the Olympic Delivery Authority to develop a strong contextual approach to a key utility building within the Olympic Park The building completed in January 2010 is not designed for an event in its own right but as one of a number of buildings that form the fabric of the Olympic site having permanance weight and dignity Strong emphasis was placed

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/in-with-the-old/ (2016-04-29)
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