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  • The Steampunk House - Access Clay Bricks | designplace
    brick skins Greg carried out the bricklaying assisted by his former apprentice master John Agnoletti John s an old school Italian guy he s really cool says Greg who all these years later is still in awe of his old boss Completing the team was Tristan Walker who was Greg s former apprentice Three generations of bricklayers three mates The internal brick face is simply painted white no plasterboard please The real treat is the three storey wall on the laneway which is a demonstration of Greg s artistic abilities in its colour texture and functionality But first we need to go back to Greg s high school days when he finished a small clay pot with a blue glaze It s still proudly displayed and this striking glaze became the basis of his colour choice for the laneway brickwork No one makes bricks that colour so Greg determined to glaze them himself all 10 500 of them By hand That s quite a challenge so he went to Richard West at The Brick Studio in Richmond who offered Austral Bricks technical assistance and access to production facilities But the hard graft of hand glazing thousands of individual bricks was down to Greg Working with Austral s technical staff three glaze formulas were devised after a lot of trial and error and a process developed A kiln car a giant trolley used to transport bricks through the brick factory on Melbourne s northern fringe was stacked with thousands of green unfired bricks These were unloaded one at a time by Greg Each brick face was brushed with a thick glue like liquid and a small baker s sieve sprinkled the glazing powders over the face The more powder the more intense the colour Each brick was then reloaded onto the kiln car and the process repeated 10 499 times The bricks were then fired at over 1200 degrees Celsius to a rock like hardness This high temperature also triggered a chemical reaction in the glaze giving each brick face its distinctive original colouring and pattern The Steampunk Home Steampunk House Design For such a massive company to be into such a little project like this it s just cool says Greg I owe Richard West and the Austral Bricks technical staff so much They were so good to us Even this glazed brickwork is not quite straightup and down On the two storeys above the entry off the laneway the architect had originally proposed openable windows to catch the breeze off nearby Port Phillip Bay Greg replaced this with a breezewall made from hand glazed bullnose bricks laid on their side with operable windows inside Ingenious In the house there are more quirky yet practical touches that could only come from Greg A four metre by one metre plunge pool cantilevered over the front replacing Archie s old plastic pool A life size Star Wars Stormtrooper illustration hidden in a shallow recess behind a wired glass door Finely fluted edges

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/project-list/steampunk-house/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Firmness, Commodity & Delight | designplace
    awards for its work including the Architecture Art Award of China in 2004 the Holcim Award for Sustainable Construction in the Asia Pacific in 2005 the Global Award for Sustainable Architecture in 2007 and the Schelling Architecture Prize in 2010 To look at the state of the architecture profession it would seem that anything is possible and more often than not we get anything remarked the Australian architect Glenn Murcutt a former winner of the Pritzker Architecture Prize himself and one of the judges who awarded it to Wang this year Form for its own sake has become a superficial discipline Wang Shu and Lu Wenyu however have avoided the sensational and the novel In spite of what is still a short period in practice they have delivered a modern rational poetic and mature body of varying scaled public work Their work is already a modern cultural asset to the rich history or Chinese architecture and culture The Amateur Architecture Studio is best known for the following buildings in China the Library of Wenzheng College 2000 in Suzhou the Ningbo Contemporary Art Museum 2005 in Ningbo Five Scattered Houses 2005 in Ningbo the Xiangshan Campus of the China Academy of Art 2004 2007 in Hangzhou Ceramic House 2006 in Jinhua Vertical Courtyard Apartments 2007 in Hangzhou the Ningbo History Museum 2008 in Ningbo and the Exhibition Hall of the Imperial Street of Southern Song Dynasty 2009 in Hangzhou Wang Shu frequently uses recycled building materials especially old clay bricks and roof tiles which unfortunately have become far too plentiful in China in recent years due to the indiscriminate demolition of the country s old low rise buildings in order to make way for new often foreign designed multi storey developments For example Wang salvaged over two million roof tiles from traditional houses that had been demolished as a result of this profligate pursuit of progress and reused them on his award winning design for the Xiangshan Campus of the Chinese Academy of Art For the tenth International Architecture Exhibition at the Venice Biennale in 2006 Wang created Tiled Garden an installation that consisted of 66 000 semicircular grey roof tiles that had been recovered from demolition sites in China This was his subtle yet powerful protest about the current rapid and often thoughtless destruction of China s traditional everyday built environment And the amazing textural walls of perhaps his best known building the Ningbo History Museum were constructed from about one million recycled bricks and tiles salvaged from old buildings that had been razed in the region of Ningbo Recycled building materials often seem to have magically absorbed the essence of a place which is one of their characteristics that Wang Shu has taken advantage of to stunning effect on several occasions Everywhere you can see people don t care about the materials remarked Wang Shu while discussing his Ningbo History Museum They just want new buildings they just want new things I think the material is not just about

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/firmness-commodity-delight/ (2016-04-29)
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  • From Palladio to Plasticity | designplace
    since 1968 it became a separate event in 1980 So 2012 will see the 13th Venice Architecture Biennale the fourth in which Australia has consecutively exhibited and the third in which Austral Bricks has been a major sponsor The 2012 Architecture and 2013 Art Biennales will be the last uses for the Cox designed Australian Pavilion before being demolished to make way for a new permanent structure The outgoing pavilion has had critics being labeled anachronistic corrugated kangaroo architecture a backyard dunny a shed house and a difficult space to curate These criticisms fail to acknowledge the success of its Australian image in the eyes of most international visitors over 25 years Sydney Morning Herald architecture critic Elizabeth Farrelly at least puts the Philip Cox design into context as a temporary pavilion and notes that it is as bright as a rosella on a handrail and as blithe as a cresting wave Indeed the Australian pavilion offers visual relief from the majority of other pavilions which because of their windowless walls and over scale entries give the impression of a jumble of electricity substations from various decades Within the context of its design and construction time and the generosity and rapid response of its original sponsors the existing Australian pavilion represents a triumph One of the continuing sponsor companies of Australian participation in the Venice Architecture Biennale is Austral Bricks The company s technical and research manager Cathy Inglis has been involved in two previous Biennales and the 2012 exhibit She rates the existing Pavilion well as far as display space is concerned It is to be replaced by a new building designed by the Melbourne architectural practice of Denton Corker Marshall Elizabeth Farrelly rates the DCM design highly ranking it potentially in the top four of the 29 pavilions in the Venice Giadini with Takamasa Yoshizaka s 1956 Japan Pavilion Sverre Fehn s 1962 Nordic Pavilion and James Stirling s 1991 Bookshop Another little architectural gem is the sculpture courtyard at the Italian Pavilion This was designed by Carlo Scarpa in 1952 but fell into disrepair and has been recently restored it is a beautiful essay in concrete and brickwork 2012 Biennale FORMATIONS The creative directors for Australia s exhibit at the 2012 Venice International Architecture Biennale were Anthony Burke Associate Professor and Head of the School of Architecture at the University of Technology Sydney UTS and Gerard Reinmuth director of TERROIR Architects and 2010 Visiting Professor at the Aarthus School of Architecture Copenhagen and Professor in Practice at UTS in 2011 As a catalogue background for the Australian exhibit Burke and Reinmuth wrote Formations the plasticity of practice a manifesto that would frighten Marx and Engels But the exhibit was not as daunting as the manifesto In basic terms it was an exposition presenting the versatility and innovation of non standard architectural practices and their outputs that demonstrate the possibilities of expanded roles for architects To find restructured and broadened architectural practices Burke and Reinmuth surveyed Australian architects

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/from-palladio-to-plasticity/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Estilo de Español | designplace
    a staggering five and a half million units which were produced in their state of the art factory in just fifteen days Recently La Escandella has returned to Palm Island as the supplier of roof tiles for the Sofitel Resort on the island of Palm Jumeirah supplying over 150 000 Curvado tiles in Jaspee Oja The 31 storey hotel boasts sea views from every room and a mile long promenade with over 200 shops cafes and restaurants The company has become something of a resort specialist with other projects in the USA Germany Cayman Islands Antilles and Honduras The Pristine Bay Resort and Spa in Honduras was designed by acclaimed architect Guillermo Trotti also known for his industrial design including elements of the International Space Station La Escandella supplied 8900 square metres of terracotta roof tiles for this project In Australia La Escandella terracotta roof tiles have been used in a many upmarket residential projects The most prominent commercial project is the Pantanassa Greek Orthodox monastery and church at Mangrove Mountain on a rugged isolated bluff north of Sydney Stage two of this remarkable ongoing project is featured in this issue of designmag Bristile Roofing markets five La Escandella profiles in Australia Curvado is an interlocking tile with a traditional half round pan widely used on European and more especially Mediterranean buildings over the centuries These tiles can be used on roof pitches as low as twenty degrees Medio Curva is a half round tile traditionally laid as a two piece with alternate tiles inverted This profile is very typical of Spanish roofing architecture These tiles are suitable for roof pitches as low as ten degrees and are available in two sizes Planum is a lower profile tile with excellent weatherproofing Its innovative design allows for faster construction on roof

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/estilo-de-espanol/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Precast Concrete | designplace
    expectancy of at least a century They are also impact resistant won t shrink or move Concrete is chemically inert absorbs CO2 does not attract mildew or mould and is termite proof 4 Wide range of finishes Precast is the architect s choice Whether it be a trowelled exposed aggregate textured or polished off form finish ready for paint or coloured with long life oxides the choice is unlimited Austral Precast also makes Vitesse panels that are faced with real bricks 5 Recycled materials Byproducts such as fly ash slag bottom ash and grey water can be used in precast manufacture The process also recycles most of its own waste 6 Sustainable manufacture Precast concrete panels and beams are made indoors under highly controlled conditions The processes require fewer raw materials for a higher quality result Forms and liners are reusable and the process can be precisely repeated almost indefinitely 7 Faster construction Off site fabrication combines with just in time installation to minimise construction time and site disruption not to mention cost 8 Keeping it local Austral Precast is Australia s largest precaster with plants and installation professionals in four states The result is lower transport costs and better communications 9 Integrated service Austral Precast not only manufactures wall panels and floor beams but can also deliver to site and conduct the installation All with one point of contact and total responsibility 10 Reusable The mounting points in precast panels can be designed and installed to allow panels to be removed reused reconfigured or extended without costly and disruptive demolition The remarkable concrete engineering skills of ancient Rome left a legacy across its former empire Their direct decendants today s precast concrete panels and beams are used in structures that those ancient engineers would recognise and marvel at their

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/precast-concrete/ (2016-04-29)
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  • Thanks for the Memory | designplace
    that mean for the collective memory of a house Both owners of the Ilma Grove house worked for the timber industry when they approached Maynard to rebuild and extend the north facing rear of their brick house They wanted to do a sustainable timber build but a 100 year old covenant required construction to be in brick and tile and cost more than five hundred pounds says Maynard Removal of the covenant was possible but we said let s do something interesting within that constraint Which is surprising as the Maynard practice is noted for its use of timber The change to brickwork is probably a more rigorous sustainable approach contends Maynard s business partner Mark Austin We don t use bricks that much and there s no particular reason why he admits But what we like about bricks is that idea of memory and working around North Fitzroy you see some amazing brickwork The original house has become a dormitory space while the new extension functions primarily as an open plan kitchen lounge dining area on the lower level with a master suite above linked by a spiral staircase that continues to the roof deck From the deck there are views to the city and across to the distant Dandenongs The bridge between the old and new is strictly delineated by a brief glass link that allows views to the exterior of both structures I think it s a common mistake to put on an extension and wrap it all in white plasterboard so you can t see the line between new and old says Maynard We made the connection absolutely apparent There s a chronology in the building The extension is built on footings and floored in bluestone flags another material that was locally quarried until recently to increase the winter solar gain with brickwork providing the external thermal mass Internally the lower level mostly uses cabinetry as walling while the upstairs areas are plywood lined A small vege garden even makes a small incursion into the lower level The projecting upper level is supported on a steel ring beam with welded shelf angles and sitting on four steel posts We thought wouldn t this be great if we could get this beautiful heavy material and then have it seem to defy gravity says Maynard The overhang lower level and recessed hood upper level were carefully calculated to allow winter sun to penetrate but exclude the higher summer sun From October no sun hits that glass On the western face a number of bricks were rotated and projected to form attachment points for creepers They also come in handy as an impromptu climbing wall Unusual challenges such as this were taken in their stride by the bricklayers and other trades There were some really good trades on site Maynard commends They just knew what we were after A further quirky touch is a stencilled artwork on the bottom left of the rear brickwork Andrew Maynard and Mark Austin

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/thanks-for-the-memory/ (2016-04-29)
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  • In Profile With Andrew Maynard | designplace
    to be known as such and contends that work life balance is a core part of his firm s ethos This doesn t seem to have taken a toll on their productivity because there is clearly a plethora of projects that this little firm has taken on Andrew is very clear that the firm will stay small because it works best at five people We don t want to grow further than that It may make more money but we would probably be more miserable Maynard says he is often called a media slut a description he rejects Media is a ubiquitous part of life and culture he contends He believes in being accessible and is more than willing to communicate in ways that people understand through his website blogging and in a willingness to be involved in media His first formative architectural experience was as an 11 year old at a Peter Greiner designed holiday home in Tasmania s north east which revealed that wonderful difference between building and architecture and shaped the direction he has taken It was the multilayering of spaces blurring the edges between inside and outside that was so intriguing he recalls This is what really interests me the edges of spaces and complex arrangements He was exposed at an early age to different parts of Australia as the family moved with his father s work developing his awareness of the design principles that have shaped cities Other influences are Scandinavian and Japanese architecture where the junction between the tectonic and modernism has delivered rich examples of human scale architecture with a fine tactile experience University of Tasmania s late and much admired Rory Spence was also a clear influence as was the hands on nature of the design workshops where you were required to

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/andrew-maynard/ (2016-04-29)
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  • The Diving Bell | designplace
    busy street with more status and quality than Primus van Gilsstraat which was my reason for making the entrance door at this side and the garage entrance from the secondary street Jacq de Brouwer explains The building may appear from the outside to be introverted however from the inside it is open and wide catalysed by a skylight and broad panoramic window bays An elevator and a spiral staircase connect the two stacked two storey apartments from the shared lobby and car park Each apartment in the five storey villa also has an internal staircase next to the centrally placed elevator accessible from each floor The first and top floors each contain living room kitchen and office functions that have exceptional panoramic views from the large windows Sliding doors allow these windows to be transformed into covered balconies The variation in window size supports the interplay between the enclosed and exposed spaces In addition the upper apartment has a private roof terrace The opening in the roof doubles as a skylight and together with the panoramic windows ensures a high level of natural light Additionally the wall next to the central staircase is made of glass to reinforce the effect of the skylight The more functional rooms are clustered on the two middle floors These introverted spaces follow the cylindrical shape and have vertical slit windows that create a special atmosphere that is very intimate De Brouwer considers It is a kind of a church feeling it is like a room in an old chapel From the outside the narrow and high windows may look small but according to the owner of the lower apartment they transmit more than enough light Critics might say that the cylindrical shape and the resulting circular floor plan wastes space However this was a conscious choice by De Brouwer who gave a higher priority to spatial qualities like the dissolving effect of a curved white wall and the church like atmosphere of the tall slit windows The target group of potential purchasers was also considered and with a per square meter price of 4000 the average in this area is 2600 these apartments are made for people who are willing to pay for a premiumquality product Although the two apartments have a very different character as a result of difference in orientation and internal configuration they complement each other and create a unique building Contrasting materialisation Externally De Brouwer wanted to create four distinct facades that combine to form a unique 360 degree facade In Holland most of the apartments are just sampled or mirrored and I think every person wants to have the feeling of being unique and therefore we tried to make special conditions for special people The material choice for the facade is derived partly from the idea of connecting to the dark brown bricks of the nearby Tilburg church There was also a desire to create something prominent in the area and which related to De Brouwer s former work

    Original URL path: http://designplace.com.au/the-diving-bell/ (2016-04-29)
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