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  • Newsletter
    small bags increasing both the cost per bag and the labour cost 4 x 500g bags at 90c each are a LOT cheaper than 10 x 200g bags at 80c each Quaha machine prices have also increased RRP for the Lux is 249 00 the Junior 535 00 and the Napoletana 749 00 The first stocks of Napoletanas has arrived and I ve cleared up a considerable backlog The Juniors and the Lux have yet to come into stock but when they do all existing orders will be supplied at the OLD price I ll get my new prices up in the next couple of days below the RRP as always One of the most frequent questions that people ask is what s the best way to store coffee There s an extended discussion on my website at http www coffeeco com au altcof altcoffeepage10 html but briefly the facts are this Fresh roasted coffee gives off large quantities of carbon dioxide and other volatiles and stales in the presence of oxygen moisture and light Vacuum packing in valved foil bags removes oxygen and moisture which are then replaced by CO2 gas This will slow down the staling process which can be further slowed by freezing the unopened packs My own taste tests have shown that coffee packed and frozen in this way only starts to alter in taste and brewing characteristics after about 12 weeks Note that coffee not packed like this should not be frozen as the presence of moisture and oxygen will lead to much faster deterioration Once a pack is opened it should be stored in an airtight glass container in the bottom of the fridge and used within a week All the times above apply to ground coffee with whole beans you could probably double

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/february2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    machines but the existing shortage will continue until at least early April Once the pipeline is up and running again things should even out but in the meantime I just have to put up with it Things on the Rancilio front are much smoother I now have the Stainless steel bases available to match the Silvia Rocky set The Bases have a knockout drawer and an accessories drawer and will be 143 00 including GST Stocks of Silvias and Rockys are pretty good as well there may be one or two weeks when I m out of stock between shipments but that should be all Those customers who want to buy the whole stainless steel set can do so at a total cost of 1287 00 inc GST plus delivery If you ve already bought the Silvia and Rocky from me and would like the base contact me for a deal Some more good news is the return of the 58mm blind filter and espresso machine detergent offer for 11 00 inc GST with any coffee order I managed to get 30 blind filters so they shouldn t run out as fast as they did last time I ve just finished checking out the Expobar Office Control heat exchanger machine This unit is meant as a single group machine for small deli or office use and is pretty cheap as such things go 1700 00 However I wasn t that impressed with it it lacks several major features compared to its higher end and slightly more expensive cousins and doesn t pull significantly better shots than a Silvia Having finally caught up with my backlog I hope to evaluate a couple of the competing machines this month with a round up in April or May I won t be going

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/march2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    say is that if I reviewed machines the way Choice does no one would EVER trust my recommendations again Their review has to be one of the worst examples of ignorance about the whole espresso process that I ve ever seen As far as I can tell all the machines were tested with a single unspecified coffee at the same grind level No effort was made to adjust grind parameters for 25 second shots or to differentiate between single and double shots amount of coffee in filter baskets or correct warm up procedures I m glad I m not one of the Espresso Experts quoted at the end of the review although to be fair to those involved none of them have any form in the domestic espresso field at all If you buy an Espresso machine based on this review you WILL be disappointed Anyway on to a much cheerier subject Indonesian Coffee Coffee cultivation was started on Java by the Dutch in 1696 and has continued to this day All the islands that make up the Indonesian Archipelago have some form of coffee growing activity but the best beans are generally considered to be the Sulawesi Toraja Sumatra Mandheling and Lintong and the Java Arabica All the beans have the common characteristics of relatively low acidity and heavy body but there are significant flavour variations between them In particular the Java Arabica was the first to be exported to Holland and the long sea voyages produced a type of aging or monsooning which reduced the acidity and increased the body even further The distinctive taste is still prized in quality Dutch coffees today So this month s special is the Aged JAVA ARABICA 35 00 kg This is a great big brute of a coffee with an incredibly

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/april2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    Josef except that it s fabulous coffee It has a mild sweet acidity with a complex nutty middle palate full body which surprised me and a peanuts and chocolate aftertaste In fact it reminds me very much of a Mavis Bank Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee I tasted in the late 1970 s Fortunately it s nowhere near as expensive So this month s special is DOMINICAN CAFE JOSEF 40 00 kg Note that I wouldn t necessarily recommend this coffee as a straight espresso even though it has a huge dense crema The acidity does tend to be a bit overwhelming but as a milk drink it s a knockout It s also probably the first time that coffee consumers in Australia have been offered a Dominican Republic coffee and it is totally exclusive to Coffee for Connoisseurs And as with the Haiti coffee it s a try it now situation I don t know if I ll ever see this particular bean again I ve set aside some green beans for the home roasters out there as well but the limit is 500g of green per person and sorry no repeats Which leads me on to my coffee specials in general I often get asked for them months after the newsletter in which they appeared was published in the hope that I ll have some secreted away somewhere I m sorry but the special coffees are just that usually a couple of bags in a whole container load of very average green coffees When they re gone and that s usually within the first couple of weeks that s it for the next few months In the past I ve been able to offer my importer enough volume to justify making a special coffee a regular stock item but

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/may2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    an anonymous of course complaint and fined him for it There s more to it than that of course since Don s factory is in an Industrial area that s being yuppified and said coffee smell and worse emanates from the doors of every chain coffee store in New York but Don s a fighter and won t be giving in he s taking it to a higher court Anyway I thought I d take this opportunity to quote him and wish him well in his battle with idiot bureaucracy the whole specialty coffee trade is deeply in his debt Mocha Java In coffee Eden first there was Mocha and then there was Java The first blend made either by accident or by design but probably by the hand of man rather than the hand of God but you never know about these things was made by putting the two original coffees of commerce together in the same pot M J is a remembered taste in the cultural history of American coffee cuisine It represents to us something warm and wonderful tied to our simpler quainter culinary past M J is the coffee equivalent of Sweet Sour in other foods The original blends were formed by the mixing of two distinctively different coffee tastes and looks The deep smooth heavy taste of old weathered Javas they got that way crossing the ocean in equatorial heat in unvented cargo holds of wooden bottomed sailing ships and the piquant bitter sweet cocoay taste of Arabian now Yemen Mochas that were blended together usually after but sometimes prior to roasting The bakers term Mocha by the way comes from trying to recreate the taste of those cocoay notes of pure Arabian coffee They succeeded in an overly sweet way by literally adding chocolate to coffee The traditional look of the M J blend is small curled beans Mocha and Large flat beans Java mixed together Today roasters try to recreate the taste of old any number of ways most often with lively small bean new crop Central American coffees standing in for the Mochas blended with larger past crop coffees of American or other origin filling in for the old Javas The nearest thing to an old brown Java today is India Monsooned Malabar The Mochas of course are still grown in Yemen and can be found in the better coffee lines here in the states A hundred years ago true Mocha Java was already a thing of legend no longer found in packages so named At that time almost all the Mochas we saw were Brazil coffees Any mild of good bean was sold as Javas The purists howled but the stuff was sold as Mocha Java anyway This ended with the passage of the first Food Drug laws in the US beginning in 1906 The big brands switched to proprietary names to avoid being scolded by the Government for mislabeling When I was a boy I was in High School when

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/june2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    for a lot of people arriving on the Ferry from Tasmania as well as the cruise ships that dock at Station Pier My request for a single espresso resulted in 50ml of beverage with a thin pale yellow crema and not a lot of body Worse the coffee produced from Lavazza beans had a distinct stale flavour There was no detectable robusta taste though Beacon Cove Foodstore Unremarkable Lavazza espresso Next stop was Café Zest about 200 metres away Here the coffee was from Coffex the shot volume was 30ml the crema was light brown and body and flavour were reasonable The blend had a hint of acidity but again no robusta rubber Cafe Zest a decent shot Another 200 metres along the beach brought me to Grissini This shot was simply an excellent commercial shot produced from Grinders coffee 30ml rich reddish brown crema full body and smooth low acid taste Grissini at 1 Beach St Now this is a good shot I headed inland for 300 metres to Starbucks to see how they compared Their single espresso was much cheaper than the shots to date 2 35 vs 2 80 and I watched the shot being correctly timed and pulled on their monster 4 group La Marzocco Unfortunately this didn t help the shot quality much the crema was thin and yellow and the predominant aroma and flavour was charcoal with the low acid bitterness associated with overroasting An obvious case of how even decent barista skills can t overcome poor quality or badly roasted coffee Starbucks in Bay St Not very good Overall it seems from sampling a few other establishments that most of the local espresso bars are reasonable at least especially where they are using fresh locally roasted coffee In other news my Rancilio shipment

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/july2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    course consists of 10 hours of face to face instruction and 20 hours of work experience research and assessment making it a bit of a bargain at the price There are 6 2 group auto machines with matching grinders for the students to work at and class sizes are small to ensure maximum hands on experience The actual instruction is divided into 6 Elements which cover everything from correct bean storage to how to make and serve a varied drinks order the right way My take on the course layout is that it covers all the basics and apart from the Khaldi legend doesn t convey any MIS information to the students which can be just as important Students who complete the course successfully aren t going to be instant baristas but will certainly have the necessary skills and knowledge to develop into competent ones One of the things that Jill stresses is that students learn not just what to do but why they re doing it so they are not just pulling shots by rote I have to say that having this sort of course on your resume would have to make you a whole lot more employable in the Café industry as well I just wish something like this had been around when I was getting started in the business As well as the major course the Academy also conducts short courses on a variety of coffee subjects these are aimed more at the general public side of things and don t carry the official recognition They also carry out in house employee training sessions at employer s shops when required In the near future there will be a longer 60 hour course with more in depth coverage and on the job training at a higher cost A 450 00 You can see a BIG picture of the old brochure here coffeeacademy html A new one is due this month Jill is currently hard at work on a complete training DVD which will cover the whole industry from grower to cup she s soon heading off to film the coffee harvest in Northern Queensland as part of this This DVD is intended to be available for sale to both the trade and the public as part of the overall effort to improve coffee standards in Australia As I understand things the Specialty Coffee Association of America s Barista Certification program is competition based and is not formally recognised The Coffee Academy is NOT aiming to turn out Barista Champions rather competent bar staff who can make decent espresso beverages correctly and efficiently The employer benefits by having well trained staff and the employee benefits by having a professional qualification officially recognised by the Australian National Training Authority throughout Australia My opinion is that this sort of training is ideally suited to a country where even the Mum Pop corner milk bars and hot bread shops have espresso machines and it can be of immense benefit to both new

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/august2003.html (2015-11-27)
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  • Newsletter
    lots of smoke appear This is second crack and just at this point is usually where body acid and flavour are at their best balance This was George Howell s original Full City roast Of course some beans don t have much acidity some don t have much body so not all coffees are perfect at this roast Further roasting drives off the acid brings out the oil and lets body predominate Sugars in the beans caramelise and oil coats the surface of the beans Second crack is the most difficult part of the roast to handle because a few seconds more or less roast at this point can make big differences to final coffee taste Beyond this point carbonisation sets in all varietal character disappears and body and charcoal tastes reach a maximum This is the sort of thing called Italian French and Vienna roast or the Full City espresso roast by Starbucks In my personal opinion it s not a nice thing to do to a specialty grade coffee There is actually an official system of roast colour measurement called the Agtron system but few consumers are aware of it so the confusion in roast names will be around for a long time yet This month s special is just a lovely coffee with a beautiful smooth taste It s also one of the best certified by Natureland organic coffees I ve tried Organic Peru Villa Rica 35 00 kg A Second Crack roast gives a smooth rich flavour with balanced acidity and a hint of smoke in the aftertaste Best for filter and plunger brewing or milk based espressos In other news Bodum has taken over all distribution of their products in Australia but have yet to import all the necessary stock There will probably be a

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/september2003.html (2015-11-27)
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