archive-au.com » AU » C » COFFEECO.COM.AU

Total: 189

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Newsletter
    on all of the above brewing methods since then there haven t been any really novel ways of getting brewed coffee out of the combination of beans and water What has happened is a lot of tinkering around the edges with automation and electronics substituting for various stages of human input Many of these inventions strike me as solutions in search of a problem In the last few years I ve seen the Clover vacuum plunger the Bunn Trifecta pressurized drip and the Alpha Domiche Steampunk vacuum drip All of them offer tight electronic control of brewing parameters none of them make a better coffee than can be brewed manually One thing that they all have in common is more visual excitement than watching a drip cone or plunger at work The other thing they share is a substantial price tag well out of proportion to the quality they produce Coffee accessories can fall into the same sort of category There is no practical difference between a 10 00 tamper and a 100 00 tamper as long as they both fit properly Gadgets are more or less the same I have a portafilter pressure gauge which gets used once per machine during setup and after that almost never It s great if you sell a lot of machines or you re a service tech but otherwise pretty useless The latest gadget is the VST Refractometer a device which measures the Total Dissolved Solids TDS extracted during brewing and via a patented computer program extrapolates the results to a total extraction percentage Which is a useful measurement because well just because In fact there is NO scientifically established correct extraction level which can be used for all coffees all roasts and all brewing methods About the best than can be done

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/april2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Newsletter
    and that the VST company had tightened up the original research and had recent results showing that the same sort of range applied to espresso Fine I accept that the range is pretty wide but relevant but does it apply for instance to Robusta beans Very high or very low temperatures Ultra fine grinds And when it comes to formal published in The Journal of Food Science research there isn t much that I can find and nothing from VST The usefulness of the VST refractometer is another matter Yes it can be used to identify extraction problems and yes it makes a great quality control device for high end roasting and brewing It should definitely be compulsory for every manufacturer of superauto pod and capsule espresso machines and it s a great tool for winning barista competitions It should certainly be used to address the lack of published scientific research into coffee extraction What it is not is a device for everyday consumers Apart from anything else using it involves pipettes and filter papers I don t think that Bringing my customers into 21st century coffee as one of my critics put it requires teaching them the basics of physical chemistry The other part of Mark Prince s post was more relevant to something that s been irritating me for a while now and that is the glorification of excessive acidity in coffee As I said in my October 2012 newsletter if that s Third Wave coffee I ll avoid it The whole ultra light roast ultra acidic push appears to be more a product of jaded palates looking for the next big thing than anything else The theory that ultra light roasting allows you to properly taste the coffee s real flavour is frankly junk All I can

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/may2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Newsletter
    the Trade day The coup on Tuesday stopped any further efforts to investigate the coffee business and Thailand and caused us to bring forward our return flight Disappointing but out of our control The only bright spot was my observation that several street coffee vendors we saw on our walks between the hotel and the Skytrain were actually using Lelit Combi machines to produce their wares Just shows how bulletproof these little machines are Pity I don t have any left There were a few other interesting bits of equipment at the Thaifex show including a display of Sunbeam Café Series machines NOT labelled Sunbeam presumably coming from the other door in the original Chinese factory and my first close look at the Loring commercial coffee roaster This is a roaster that is supposed to completely burn all the fuel used and roasting gases and smoke produced during roasting resulting in energy savings of up to 80 Unfortunately I was unable to see it actually working but I was given a good explanation of the concepts behind it The reason I go to Trade Shows discovering a new coffee A familiar selection of Welcome brand machines Tasting some Thai regional coffees TV after the Coup even the Cartoon Channel Anyway on to this month s special coffee full name Ethiopian Sidamo Guji Supreme Grade 1 Natural Ethiopian Guji Sidamo 52 00 kg This is one of the recent crop of superb fruit forward Ethiopian coffees It has rich tropical fruit flavours and clean sweetness and acidity in the front palate a full body and an almost drinking chocolate finish These fruit bomb Ethiopians are a relatively recent development resulting from better control over the ways coffee is processed after it has been picked It s very labour intensive involving raised

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/june2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Newsletter
    pod at 0 70 each but overall worked out at 107 70 kg Equal cheapest were the Caffitaly Gloria Jeans Nicaraguan and the Aldi K fee at 46 90 kg and 0 38 per capsule Quality was another matter and had no relationship to price at all I emptied out capsules and did a standard cupping of all the different coffees I d bought a dozen or so all up None of the coffees I tasted would rate above an 82 just barely specialty grade Equal best were the Lavazza 92 00 kg and the Gloria Jeans Nicaraguan 46 90 kg By far the worst was MAP in the Caffitaly capsule 81 25 kg with virtually no detectable flavour or aroma at all Second worst was Piazza D Oro L or Nespresso Compatible 115 38 kg showing distinct signs of staling Packaging clearly affected this The L or compatible capsules are NOT sealed like Nespresso but are inside foil wrappers And speaking of compatibility all the different systems have different size and shape capsules except Aldi and Caffitaly Those two are different internally though The Nestle Dolce Gusto system has extra large capsules some of which are filled with a powdered milk sugar and soy concoction supposed to make milk foam I ve tasted worse CafeBar comes to mind but not recently Every different system requires its own machine so once you ve bought the machine you re locked into the system Finally the worst part of all coffee capsule systems is the packaging wastage involved None of the capsules can be recycled in household bins so they all end up as landfill Caffitaly are the worst since the capsules have plastic water spreaders on top of the coffee and a crema disk below making the wastage 3 8 grams

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/july2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coffee for Connoisseurs Monthly Newsletter
    linked and I ve begun the process of editing some of the remaining ones The machine repair articles are the first but others will follow and hopefully I ll have new content before the end of this year Domestic Espresso Machine Repair has been split up into Rancilio Silvia Repairs and Imat Nemox Lelit Repairs I ve also cleaned up the Glossary and Cleaning and Maintenance pages and added a bit here and there The new stuff will be much more coffee oriented rather than being about machines However before all that happens I ve got a couple of hundred pages of content to go through removing dead links restoring broken ones and cleaning up code This also means that I m going to have to be even more involved in the green beans and roasting sides of the industry than I am at present a process that s already begun Towards the end of July I attended a cupping evening organised by H A Bennett Sons Australia s leading green coffee importers There were 10 really high end coffees on the cupping tables and 40 or so eager people from the local industry slurping away at them A bunch of happy coffee professionals just before the cupping started Scott Bennett is on the left in the light blue shirt On offer were 2 Indian coffees a Colombia a Costa Rica 3 Panamas and 3 Yemens The stand out coffees of the night were one of the Panamas and one of the Yemens Of course I ve already snagged small quantities of both coffees The quantities are small because the green coffees are exceptionally expensive by any standards I thought about quantity limits but instead decided to try first in best dressed for at least this month So the August

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/august2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coffee for Connoisseurs Monthly Newsletter
    body The finish is smooth but equally intense and lingering The closest taste analogy would be Lindt 85 Cacao with a coffee edge Bani Matar is one of the coffees from the high altitude mountainous region surrounding Sana a Photos I have seen of coffee cultivation in this area show the coffee growing on trees rather than the low shrubs seen in other areas I m told this is because the plants are both very old and that this is the way they are cultivated I don t know if this means that the beans are a slightly different varietal to the other Yemen Arabicas but the taste is quite distinctive One thing that isn t often appreciated is that virtually all of the Arabica coffee plants grown in the world are direct descendants of plants or seeds originally smuggled out of Yemen Legend has it that Baba Budan an Islamic Sufi mystic smuggled seven coffee seeds out of Yemen and into India in the early 1600 s Historical fact is that in 1616 a coffee plant was successfully transported from al Makha Mocha to Amsterdam by Dutch sailors At close to the same time there were already attempts by the Dutch to establish coffee plantations in Indonesia using seedlings from India More than half the Arabica coffee grown today can trace its lineage from a few plants transported from the West Indies to Reunion island and most of the original West Indies coffees from a single plant brought from Amsterdam to Martinique This makes Arabica with all its sub species varietals and mutations basically a monoculture It also makes Arabica extraordinarily susceptible to disease and climate change It s pretty obvious that increasing the genetic diversity of coffee should be a high priority Dr Aaron Davis of the Royal

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/september2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coffee for Connoisseurs Monthly Newsletter
    be less than 49 00 Second question is Is it a superautomatic machine If so where was it made Made in Italy or Switzerland machines can be worth up to 300 00 or so made in China half that or less A strong dose of Buyer Beware is indicated here there s a good chance that the person buying a secondhand superauto is paying to inherit someone else s problem Avoid just serviced machines that s usually code for will work for a week then break again Then come machines with pumps and portafilters Chinese mass produced thermoblock machines in perfect condition no more than one third of full price when new Ditto any machine with a pressurized portafilter My advice is to always look up the new price before contemplating the secondhand one Decent single boiler machines with proper brass portafilters and SS filter baskets may bring up to 60 of new price depending on age and condition The same rule more or less applies to single group HX or double boiler machines designed for domestic or light commercial use You have to remember that there is no warranty on a secondhand machine no matter how perfect its condition As a rule of thumb I knock another 5 off the price for each year of service so a 5 year old machine that cost 2400 00 new would now be worth 1200 00 in perfect nick Damage scale leaks or electrical problems would cut that by half or more Finally proper commercial machines 2 3 or 4 group are valued strictly according to initial cost age and condition Any machine older than 5 years is basically worth only scrap value because its total cost has been depreciated for tax purposes They are rarely purchased for home use because even

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/october2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coffee for Connoisseurs Monthly Newsletter
    the oven Lightly roasted coffee is the norm when cupping for fault as problems with the flavour will show up immediately However professional cuppers don t drink the samples they spit after slurping The coffees they drink are generally much darker roasts The main flavour that you get from such light roasts is acidity followed by whatever fruit is present and then a somewhat bread like aftertaste a bit of yeast and malt The coffees I was served at the Event had all been brewed in glass drips with filter papers using electronic scales and PID electric kettles The liquid in the carafes after brewing was not the normal brownish black but instead a glowing red The three coffees Kenya Ethiopia and Guatemala were indeed acidic somewhat fruity and slightly tannic in the aftertaste They all tasted different blackberries for the Kenya strawberries for the Ethiopia and grapes for the Guatemala but none of them rang my bell as exciting coffees That was when I realised that to my palate they didn t taste much like coffees at all The flavours I was getting had more in common with something like a rosehip tea than with what I expect from coffee The Nordic Roasts were definitely unsuitable for espresso being acidic enough to curdle any added milk but I strongly suspect that the brews as presented would meet the approval of most tea drinkers Especially if they favour black tea with lemon All I can say is It s coffee Jim but not as we know it It s certainly not a style of coffee I enjoy or support What I do support is bold coffees with intense clearly defined flavours reasonable body and smooth finishes I like the same characteristics in red wines as well Which in both beverages

    Original URL path: http://www.coffeeco.com.au/newsletter/november2014.html (2015-11-27)
    Open archived version from archive