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  • ASHES: Australia clubs its way toward redemption | Business Spectator
    527 for 7 If they are to retain an interest in this Ashes series it is imperative that they win this game This means taking 20 England wickets in three days plus 30 overs this evening on a wicket still playing so well that Australia simply cannot waste the time taken to push the score past 600 Bobby Simpson did so here in 1964 when he scored a triple century and the match was drawn A draw now means that England retain the Ashes Clarke s strategy finally worked when he called on the fifth bowler at his disposal The opening pair of Ryan Harris and Mitchell Starc failed to make the breakthrough Shane Watson was economical but not particularly threatening The most dangerous spell had been bowled by the off spinner Nathan Lyon who had been brought on as early as the seventh over Clarke did not turn to Peter Siddle until England had survived 21 overs and by the close he had taken two wickets in five overs for seven runs England ended the day on 52 for 2 475 behind It has been Australia s day Siddle pitched the ball up to Joe Root who had poked around for 96 minutes Root mistakenly played back and feathered a catch to Brad Haddin having scored a meagre eight runs With eight overs still to play Tim Bresnan came in as nightwatchman as he had done at Lord s and in the 28th over he played an ugly defensive poke The keeper the slips and Siddle himself appealed confidently for a catch behind the wicket After consulting Alastair Cook Bresnan decided not to review It proved to be another error the replays showed the ball had hit his pocket not his bat Before Siddle s crucial intervention the principal threat to England s openers was Lyon who had been brought on by Clarke in the seventh over It was an ingenious move and it nearly came off brilliantly in Lyon s first over when Cook edged the ball onto the keeper s glove and it ballooned up towards first slip Clarke diving forward almost got to it had he done so this would have come high in the captain s unique catalogue of successful speculative bowling changes Lyon had been selected in place of Ashton Agar who had batted better than he bowled in the first two Tests Having been engaged as a groundsman at the Adelaide Oval the local coaches decided Lyon would be more useful to South Australia playing rather than preparing He was awarded his Baggy Green in 2011 and at 25 he has taken 76 wickets in 22 Tests Today he made the selection of Agar look like an engaging error Slim with thinning hair Lyon buttons his shirtsleeves at the wrist There is a flurry of arms and legs as he delivers the ball Root was quite bemused and the most surprising thing about the 10 overs he bowled was that he did not

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/3/ashes/ashes-australia-clubs-its-way-toward-redemption (2014-01-13)
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  • ASHES: Clarke finds sweet redemption | Business Spectator
    Clarke began to bat imperiously Between tea and the close Australia added 123 runs and England didn t have the sniff of a wicket That had not always been the case At the start of the innings Shane Watson scratched around nervously like a man deeply conscious of his failure to meet expectations He survived three crises before tamely edging a catch to first slip His score was only 19 but the first wicket partnership was already worth 76 At the other end Chris Rogers was playing with a stylish fluency which is familiar to crowds in England County and Australian Shield cricket but which he has disciplined out of existence in the series so far Rogers s 50 came off 49 balls but as his hundred drew closer he became more circumspect He had punished bad balls ruthlessly but now he began to play and miss He had got as far as 84 out of 129 when Swann trapped him lbw He had also showed his colleagues that the devil might have been in their minds rather than the pitches Khawaja had been unlucky given out caught behind by Tony Hill the New Zealand umpire and confirmed after a review by Kumar Dharmasena the third umpire Appalled Cricket Australia have referred the decision to the ICC But at that point Australia s fortunes changed and Steve Smith was the beneficiary of most of the new found luck Matt Prior and the slip cordon were sure that Smith had edged a catch to the keeper Umpire Marais Erasmus disagreed Dharmasena backed him Perhaps he was compensating for his earlier error Australia s luck had been transformed by a number of umpiring decisions that the English fielders in turn regarded as beyond belief They were confident that Smith had edged a catch to the keeper When Erasmus said not out the review upheld his decision Swann was confident that he had dismissed Smith with a ball that turned sharply into his pads Umpire Hill judged it not out The review failed because Hawkeye showed the ball hitting the leg stump that provided sufficient doubt to allow the umpire s decision to stand England has used its quota of two reviews but when Stuart Broad appeared to have got his 200th Test wicket for England with a ball bound for Smith s middle stump Umpire Hill did not agree Riding this luck Smith went on to reach 70 not out at the close Both sides are disenchanted by the Decision Review System One problem is that it is administered by so few umpires Because English and Australian umpires are not permitted to work in Ashes Tests only four on field umpires are available for this series a Pakistani a South African a Sri Lankan and a New Zealander It is an exhausting business demanding complete concentration It is a system which is bound to fail and has done so regularly in this series It urgently requires reform While Clarke and Smith were

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/2/ashes/ashes-clarke-finds-sweet-redemption (2014-01-13)
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  • Ashes: An English dynasty emerges | Business Spectator
    England had taken the extra half hour given to teams to finish off their opponents but the last wicket pair were unmoved But by 6 40pm there was just one more over to play Cook threw the ball to Graeme Swann whose off spin out of the bowlers footmarks at the Pavilion end had already caused three dismissals The first delivery of the last over was dramatically close to the edge of Pattinson s bat the second was played carefully into the off The third ball proved to be the winner getting Pattinson lbw for 35 He and Harris had put on 43 for the last wicket The ninth and tenth wickets added 63 runs a full quarter of a total of 235 There was jocular chatter about Australia changing the batting order by simply reversing it England had declared after 15 minutes in the morning when Joe Root was out for 180 and the total was 349 for 7 That meant Australia had to score 583 to win The runs had effectively ceased to matter and the only way to restore some pride among the batsmen was for them to play stubbornly and last as long as they could So to lose three wickets before lunch for 48 runs was a craven admission of defeat by the top order for the third time in four innings this summer Shane Watson had gone as he has in his last three innings lbw playing across the line to a ball on the leg stump Chris Rogers was bamboozled by a ball from Swann that did not turn as he had assumed it would and hit his leg stump Phillip Hughes was so sure that Swann had not dismissed him lbw that he asked for a review which proved that Swann had During lunch Michael Clarke and Usman Khawaja seem to have decided that the only realistic form of survival was to attack After a humiliating performance in the first innings Khawaja began to hit out fiercely especially on the leg side and was the first Australian batsman to a 50 in this game Michael Clarke drove elegantly straight and into the covers and reached his own 50 shortly after And then quite suddenly they were gone both out to the bowling not of Swann but Joe Root the hero on England s fight back on day three His two wickets for nine runs in seven overs removed the guts if not the heart of Australia s batting Root whose off spin out of the bowlers foot marks was no less lethal than Swann s first had Clarke caught by Cook at first slip for 51 and then Khawaja caught at second slip by Anderson for 54 Steve Smith lasted only a few minutes more and Australia had lost three wickets for two runs one of which was a wide in 23 balls That was game and set Match could not be far away and neither Brad Haddin nor Ashton Agar were able to resist it though both were unlucky to have been given out The first Test had been a glorious defeat for Australia This has been inglorious The build up of confidence and morale based on the performance in Nottingham ended abruptly at Lord s Talk of conflict in the camp between Clarke and Watson will not stop The effectiveness of each of them is being questioned The bowlers have done their best the batsmen have not and Darren Lehmann does not have many options that will transform the batting When John Arlott insisted that English supporters should never feel sorry for an Australian cricketer he did not include the coach It is hard not to feel sorry for the Australian coach Print this page More from Stephen Fay 09 Jan Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave 10 Dec Can Carney restore the BoE to its former glory 06 Nov An enigma wrapped in a puzzle wrapped in gold 07 Oct Letter from a worried London 27 Aug ASHES Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory Related articles 27 Aug ASHES Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory 26 Aug ASHES A final fireworks display 25 Aug ASHES A tale of two captains 24 Aug ASHES England running out of steam 23 Aug ASHES Australia sets the stage for next meeting More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Nathan Rickard Mon 2013 07 22 10 12 wow what a fall from grace the brittle underbelly of Australia s lack of skill with the bat was exposed for all to see Never mind that the technical deficiencies are obvious but the lack of confidence the batting line up must have doesn t bode well for the rest of the series we need a hero or a miracle Andrew Sumner Mon 2013 07 22 11 24 This is what happens when Sheffield Shield is relegated to the fringes of the domestic season losing December and January to the Big Bash Its what happens when Shield ground staff are allowed to unashamedly prepare green tops in order to ensure outright victories batsmen lose confidence and bowlers are spoiled with overly friendly conditions Its what happens when CA awards bigger contracts at state level for the short form of the game make the Shield an afterthought To turn this around will require new leadership at the top of CA with a focus back on ensuring that talent in the longer form of the game is properly encouraged developed and remunerated at state level Peter Hansen Mon 2013 07 22 11 11 Each side has now had 4 innings so far in the series On a critical analysis only 2 Australian players deserve to hold their place in the side namely Siddle and Harris Of the six specialist batsmen none of them have

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/22/ashes/ashes-english-dynasty-emerges (2014-01-13)
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  • Ashes: England piles on the misery | Business Spectator
    was more like a funeral MCC members arrive early often with their families filling the members stands long before less privileged cricket fans arrive in the public seats A jazz band of elderly musicians plays at the back of the Pavilion Food and drink are a priority The Coronation Garden behind the pavilion serves only champagne wine and Pimms Consumption of beer starts slowly but speeds up towards lunch when pints are being poured as if by perpetual motion But the spectators do come to watch the cricket too When they are all seated and attentive in mid morning the members in the Pavilion and the flanking Tavern and Warner Stands look like figures in a pointillist landscape The only thing missing when play began was the sun To tell the truth for most of the day it was not champagne cricket England s top order had dug a hole for the team the previous evening losing three wickets for 31 runs They now relied on two Yorkshiremen to extend the lead from comfortable to convincing Joe Root and Tim Bresnan who had come in as nightwatchman set about their task severely and risk free They were still together at lunch and having seen them methodically pushing the score to 113 for 3 the audience was ready for it And between lunch and tea there was plenty of time to sleep it off In two hours England scored a meagre 58 runs for the loss of Bresnan s wicket caught a mid wicket off a flat batted pull for 38 Ian Bell who already has two hundreds in the series was next up and when he was three he also seemed to be next out Ryan Harris claimed a low catch in the gulley but Bell did not walk The third umpire decided that there was reasonable doubt as to whether it had carried Harris who insisted that the catch was legitimate was furious Cricket Australia was forced to disown a tweet on its website claiming that the English had cheated again This confirmed what England had found it their wilderness years against Australian losing teams that have all the bad luck Bell was the in form player Root was fighting his way out of a slump Though he looks even younger he is only 22 slim and blond and he was promoted to opener only at the start of the Ashes having played his first six Tests in the middle order Now he was playing concentrated cricket building an innings slowly until he eventually reached his first Ashes hundred after six hours and 44 minutes That was a signal for England to accelerate and they did this so effectively that there was speculation about a declaration when the lead reached 500 with 15 overs to go Between tea and the close 162 runs came off only 32 overs Root contributed to the mayhem with two sixes off Steve Smith Bell looked like a man about to make his third

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/21/ashes/ashes-england-piles-misery (2014-01-13)
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  • THE ASHES: Australia's false promise | Business Spectator
    less it was a review wasted Michael Clarke had used his bowlers imaginatively in England s innings but when a big innings was required it did not come He might be the most prolific batsman in the world but he looked unsettled at the crease too conscious perhaps of the burden he has been carrying since the abrupt dismissal of Mickey Arthur He was out lbw too to a half volley on the leg stump which kept low As an example to his colleagues he was hapless The morning had looked bright for Australia which began the day 2 to 1 favourites at the bookies England s tail thrashed around productively with the last pair of Stuart Broad and Graeme Swann contributing 48 more runs in their last wicket stand in only 44 balls But the Australian dressing room must have thought that if the pitch was playing as easily as it looked they ought to be able to do better than England s 361 They began what should have been a journey lasting well into the third day at 11 55am By 5pm after only 53 3 overs they were back on the field again England s lead was 233 but they had not enforced the follow on Whatever faint hope they retained however was not completely extinguished by the end of the day England lost wickets to penetrating bowling by Peter Siddle Cook failed again as did Pietersen and Trott was out for a duck for the second Test in succession England s fearsome top three scored merely 30 two more than they had managed in their first innings Peter Siddle took them all his three wickets cost only four runs and it suggests that Australia does not have a monopoly on vulnerable top order batsmen in this Ashes series Ryan Harris had taken 5 for 72 in England s innings and when Australia batted Graeme Swann was able to hold up the ball to the crowd celebrating his own five for at a cost of 44 runs Harris who was Australia s best bowler has had to wait patiently for his success He is 33 but has played only 13 Tests he asks more of his body than it is able to give Despite his haul Swann was not the best of England s bowlers but he was certainly the luckiest Soon after lunch he lost control of the flight of a slower ball It was a high full toss that dipped in towards Chris Rogers who tried to hook and missed The ball hit just below the waist line Swann appealed and Umpire Erasmus gave him out lbw Since Watson had used one review at his suggestion Rogers decided it would be wrong of him to risk another Pity the ball would passed an inch or so outside the off stump Phil Hughes did not hesitate however when he was given out caught by Prior behind the wicket He too was out of luck The review found him guilty of a thin edge and Australia had no reviews left Usman Khawaja who had been preferred to Ed Cowan edged a chance to first slip exactly as Cowan had done in the first Test which Trott dropped but Khawaja could not resist a slower ball from Swann which he hit high into the air off the bottom of the bat and was caught by Kevin Pietersen at mid on It was the undistinguished stroke of a nervous batter Steve Smith misread the bounce of a delivery from Swann and was neatly caught by Ian Bell at short leg Clarke went next with the score on 91 and scoring came to a virtual standstill Australia proceeding to lose five wickets for 18 runs The inexperienced Ashton Agar ran himself out when Brad Haddin ignored his call for a quick run Siddle was Anderson s only dismissal in the innings Swann grabbed the last two wickets The last pair Harris and Siddle had put on 24 the second highest stand of the innings Australia s bowlers who stubbornly tried to make up for the failings of its batsmen were threatening to deceive at the end of a day in which no fewer than 16 wickets had fallen on an unthreatening pitch Cook and Trott edged onto their stumps Pietersen delivered a catch waist high to gully But England lead by 263 with seven wickets standing Australia are favourites no longer Stephen Fay is a former editor of Wisden and author of books about the Bank of England and the collapse of Barings Print this page More from Stephen Fay 09 Jan Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave 10 Dec Can Carney restore the BoE to its former glory 06 Nov An enigma wrapped in a puzzle wrapped in gold 07 Oct Letter from a worried London 27 Aug ASHES Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory Related articles 27 Aug ASHES Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory 26 Aug ASHES A final fireworks display 25 Aug ASHES A tale of two captains 24 Aug ASHES England running out of steam 23 Aug ASHES Australia sets the stage for next meeting More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Steve Larkin Sat 2013 07 20 09 20 When we select the best side instead of Clarkes mates we might be in with a chance Katich would make a huge difference at the top of the order How long will they persist with Watson as an opener They could bring back Hayden and Langer they would still do better than this lot It brings back nightmares of the Kim Hughes era Vern Scrimshaw Sat 2013 07 20 10 48 SO we are losing what gives us the arrogent rite to think we are that good that we should win

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/20/ashes/ashes-australias-false-promise (2014-01-13)
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  • ASHES: Australia tests Queen's allegiance | Business Spectator
    walked back to the Pavilion at the close the Australian team hung around congratulating each other England were seven wickets down for 289 An hour before the close they might reasonably have expected to have scored 40 more runs and lost a couple of wickets at the most England s recovery was started by Jonathan Trott and Ian Bell Despite the deeply uncertain start both were untroubled by the bowling By lunch the score was 80 for 3 A remarkably high percentage of the runs were coming in boundaries suggesting correctly that the bowlers were losing their venom Trott was especially fierce on both sides of the wicket he was bullying the bowlers but that comes naturally to him Ian Bell who had scored an invaluable hundred at Trent Bridge was picking up where he left off He is a small slightly vulnerable looking figure who has been promising for so long that he has reached the age of 31 without ever looking it After lunch the pair set about the bowling remorselessly One hundred came up with a wide Trott moved smoothly to his 50 from 77 balls So it was mildly astonishing when he played early at a short ball from Harris which fell lazily to Usman Khawaja running in from mid wicket Khawaja had replaced Ed Cowan who had shown little conviction at Trent Bridge Trott and Bell had put on 99 together but the stand had ended too soon to give comfort to England Jonny Bairstow joined Bell He is an inexperienced 23 year old No 6 but the selectors believe in him and he played with more style and certainty than he had done in the first Test Then on 28 he had the same kind of luck that Ashton Agar experienced on his way to his memorable debut last week Bairstow was 21 England were 171 for 4 when he played across a fine ball from Siddle which smashed into the leg and middle stumps It was an ignominious way to go He began to walk until the umpire asked him to wait There was the suspicion that Siddle might have bowled a no ball and the more often the television shot was replayed there more certain it seemed Bairstow was reprieved and began to play more freely Bell played serenely scoring faster in this Test reaching his hundred in 203 compared with 264 balls As the partnership passed 100 the scoring was easy especially off poor Pattinson who conceded 16 in one over Michael Clarke had run out of ideas except for one unlikely even desperate last throw Steve Smith is a leg break bowler who was initially picked for the Test side as a spinner but who had transformed himself into a No 5 batsman Bell was 109 the same as his score in the first Test when Smith was called upon and in his first over he delivered a perfect leg break which flew off the edge directly into Clarke s

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/19/ashes/ashes-australia-tests-queens-allegiance (2014-01-13)
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  • The Ashes | Business Spectator
    the health of the economy US labour market can withstand the chill The Fed is unlikely to dwell on the weak result for US non farm payrolls during an unseasonably cold winter The taper will go ahead but there may be some bumps in the labour market recovery Markets ASX ASX Indices Major ASX stocks Markets Spectator Currency ETFs Latest stories Scoreboard Dollar bounce US payrolls figures came in well below expectations on Friday while the Australian dollar is back to US90 cents Value Investor QBE is still at a premium There is potentially more fallout to come from QBE s ill fated expansion into the US Given its history of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories REVIEW Nokia Lumia 1520 The Nokia 1520 sports a number of key upgrades that bring it the Window s phone platform to parity with its Android competition But does this phablet do enough to sway attention from its rivals Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Is the EU about to abdicate climate leadership The rift over energy and climate policy is widening in Brussels as politicians feel the pressure from the continent s ongoing economic crisis The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu The Ashes ASHES The middle crack d Australia s

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/industries/ashes?page=1 (2014-01-13)
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  • The Ashes | Business Spectator
    leadership The rift over energy and climate policy is widening in Brussels as politicians feel the pressure from the continent s ongoing economic crisis The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu The Ashes ASHES Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory The Ashes was littered with disappointment and sometimes embarrassment but some players dazzled in their defiance of a quality English side The future is looking brighter for the Aussies by Stephen Fay 7 08am August 27 ASHES A final fireworks display The spectacular series finished with a nail biting run chase Kevin Pietersen turned the tables with his aggressive play and by the end the Australians were glad for the fading light by Stephen Fay 7 50am August 26 ASHES A tale of two captains The record books will say England won the Ashes without losing a game but both Michael Clarke and Alastair Cook must feel frustrated by their performances by Stephen Fay 7 49am August 25 ASHES England running out of steam With Ashes victory secured England struggled to keep up with Australia at The Oval as both teams sought momentum by Stephen Fay 5 17am August 24 ASHES Australia sets the stage for next meeting Australia looks past Ashes as players hope performance at The Oval prepares them for Brisbane by Stephen Fay 5 51am August 23 1 comment ASHES Watson s huge ton lifts Australia s spirits Australia rides Shane Watson s first Ashes century to victory over England on day one of Oval Test by Stephen Fay 5 25am August 22 3 comments ASHES What happened to Australian batsmen Australian cricket has yet to fill the hole left by Mike Hussey and Ricky Ponting The sad reality is that unlike the days when selectors were spoilt for choice Test level batsmen are hard to find by Stephen Fay 5 43am August 14 4 comments ASHES A salt rub for Australia s wounds Halfway to their target of 299 and only two wickets down Australia once again looked a good chance to win this test But reality reared its ugly head and the team crumbled by Stephen Fay 7 21am August 13 5 comments ASHES Australia s senior attack The Australian team s senior citizens have been the stars at Durham with Chris Rogers and Ryan Harris thrilling But how much longer can they keep going by Stephen Fay

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/industries/ashes?destination=taxonomy/term/141426 (2014-01-13)
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