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  • The richest man will be the last one streaming | Business Spectator
    member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password It is increasingly looking like the on demand streaming music war will be a winner takes all battle There s Spotify with its reported US250 million A273 1 million in fresh funding and 4 billion plus market capitalisation Despite never turning a profit the Swedish based service has investors salivating with over US538 million in funding poured into the service since its inception Then there s its competitor rdio from the founders of Skype which was reported by Techcrunch to have laid off 35 employees last week and has been searching for a new CEO since July this year The differences between the fortunes of these two companies are striking considering the differences in their product are minor With Spotify you have a well funded high profile business that has been deemed by many as a likely multi billion dollar IPO prospect which continues to spend money in overseas expansion and pile up losses With rdio you have a company with a comparatively miniscule US17 5 million in total funding just 3 per cent of Spotify s figure looking to the never nice tactic of headcount reduction as a way of reducing cash burn There is also French competitor Deezer which is claiming a paid subscriber number of over five million placing it just behind Spotify s claimed paid number of seven million There are reports that its launch into the US market has caught the eye of Microsoft who are seriously considering making a play to buy the service It s an area that is moving quickly But it also places incredible demands on capital Ultimately these services rely almost solely on the music of the artists it features Without the catalogue the services are empty utilities and the labels know it The labels are driving unsustainable royalty agreements with these services which pretty much ensure that their costs will rise in line with their revenue creating an unsustainable business Although right now they can Spotify Deezer and rdio are engaged in a landgrab that they hope will result in one ultimate winner As competition dissolves the winner will seek to renegotiate their deals down with the content owners the labels and look to create a model where both label and service generate profits This competition is good for the labels so long as investors continue to plough funds into these services despite no immediate profit upside How long this will continue is unclear Despite strong consumer uptake music streaming is a business that has so far failed to generate a return to investors in the form of profit Most investors placing funds into these businesses are looking for an exit based

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/27/technology/richest-man-will-be-last-one-streaming (2014-01-13)
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  • Supers face IT project blowout | Business Spectator
    the Window s phone platform to parity with its Android competition But does this phablet do enough to sway attention from its rivals Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Is the EU about to abdicate climate leadership The rift over energy and climate policy is widening in Europe as politicians feel the pressure from the continent s ongoing economic crisis The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Supers face IT project blowout 26 Nov 2013 6 33 AM Industries Financial Services Information Technology IT platform on pace to be delivered four years late far over budget You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password A delayed and over budget information technology IT project being implemented by a group of industry superannuation funds has absorbed yet another cost blowout according to The Australian Financial Review The five industry retirement schemes involved AustralianSuper Cbus HOSTPLUS HESTA and MTAA Super collectively own super administration firm Superpartners which is implementing an IT system intended to optimise the speed at which data and contributions are processed The project was launched in 2008 with plans to be completed by 2010 However the project which is supposed to replace eight existing platforms will currently be delivered at least four years late and cost at least 250 million The latest cost blowout will add 43 million to the cost The loss was revealed in accounts lodged with the securities regulator showing that Superpartners reported a 7 4 million loss on revenues of 257 million for the 12 months through the end of June the AFR reported Print this page Related articles 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Google s obey or perish rules of

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/26/information-technology/supers-face-it-project-blowout (2014-01-13)
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  • The never-ending retail red carpet | Business Spectator
    at WPP s retail services firm The Store says successful retailers will be those who offer a fully digitally integrated proposition that seamlessly accommodates customers desire to move from one touch point to another be it in the physical store mobile online or otherwise But he says while delivering a seamless multi channel offering may be easy to say it is unbelievably difficult to do well It s also only part of the story Following customers wherever they go is one thing but the customer increasingly wants different things once they get there too Jamie Gutfreund chief strategy officer at LA based The Intelligence Group says consumers increasingly want tailored personalised experiences and traditional brand relationships are eroding as younger consumers opt for customised products to build their own brand me A survey by JWT intelligence found 72 per cent of Gen Y consumers those aged 18 to 35 crave sensory experiences more so than previous generations with only 45 per cent of baby boomers those aged 49 and 61 per cent of Gen X ers those aged 35 to 48 ticking this box These trends are influencing where consumers put their wallets with 72 per cent of Gen Y ers saying they would rather buy an experience than a product also significantly higher than boomers at 59 per cent and Gen X at 65 per cent Retailers who are ahead of the curve in this area have responded by injecting elements of play into the shopping experience Lego s augmented reality concept stores allow customers to hold a product up to a screen which then treats them to a digital demonstration of the product within the box Then there s Burberry s digital tags which are embedded in items of clothing and trigger in store digital mirrors to regale a visual story about the product In the age of selfies and social media Gutfreund says retailers must rethink their branding to incorporate return on relationship ROR as opposed to the traditional metric of return on investment ROI It s something that social marketers have recognised for some time Weaving social media into the sales pitch May 10 and in practical terms it will require thinking outside the square and investing in experiential offerings to build customer relationships in new ways This is where customers increasing presence across digital platforms has the potential to shift from a challenge into a lucrative opportunity by using data from online activities to strengthen and deliver personalised experiences and customer brand relationship And as technology for data mining becomes more accessible retailers will find many new tools at their fingertips to chase the new paradigm of ROR Data is the new oil says David Roth There s plenty of it but the trick is to know how to refine it into something valuable My advice is hire as many mathematicians as you can get a hold of because they are the powerhouse that will drive business in the future Electronics retailer Kogan has been a local trailblazer in this space seeing phenomenal growth since the appointment of actuarial expert David Shafer as executive director in 2010 Shafer has driven the business s rapid international expansion and grown the company into one of Australia s largest online retailers with projected revenues in the 2012 financial year of 150 million Retailers such as Myer and Woolworths are also recognising the value of data driven ROR by investing in sophisticated customer loyalty programs Earlier this year Woolworths forked out 20 million for a 50 per cent stake in data analytics company Quantium to better leverage data from its Everyday Rewards loyalty program It has used this data for targeted marketing and has seen the program grow 11 per cent to seven million members after it introduced personalised offers Myer s customer loyalty program MYER one is also heavily integrated into its business model The program now accounts for 70 per cent of sales with membership increasing 9 per cent in fiscal 2013 to five million The department store spent 50 million distributing reward cards to customers in the year an investment that has clearly paid off with the average spend on redemption of a reward card coming in at 3 8 times the size of the reward At Myer s full year results presentation in September chief executive Bernie Brookes flagged further enhancements for the MYER one program saying it gave a key competitive advantage providing incredible insights through sophisticated data analysis And at its annual general meeting last month Woolworths also said there was more work to do on data analytic capabilities in order to drive new avenues for growth But Intel s chief evangelist and futurist Steve Brown also speaking at the event says retailers who go beyond targeted marketing campaigns and use data to build personalised experiences will have a competitive advantage This is where innovation will become more important than ever before as new tools that have fundamental functions for both consumers and retailers have the potential to take ROR to a whole new level For instance intelligent supermarket shelves are being prototyped at this very moment that will not only provide detailed information about products but recognise customers shopping preferences such as the need to avoid certain ingredients because of food allergies and then recommend which products the customer should choose or avoid David Roth also says brand owners must reposition themselves as curators rather than merchants and recommends visiting as many museums as possible to get a sense of the tailored curated user experience You are going to need that childlike creativity to navigate your way through the future of retail says Roth The future of retail is not what it used to be Print this page More from Hannah Francis 21 Oct Smooth online operators storm the high street 03 Oct Local retailers may bake in Uniqlo s glow 01 Oct TWEET TALK Hold but for how long 20 Sep THE WEEK AHEAD 13 Sep THE WEEK AHEAD Related articles

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/25/information-technology/never-ending-retail-red-carpet (2014-01-13)
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  • Hannah Francis | Business Spectator
    Francis 11 24am October 21 1 comment Local retailers may bake in Uniqlo s glow Struggling retailers will quake at the imminent arrival of Japanese fast fashion behemoth Uniqlo They ll need to adapt to survive by Hannah Francis 2 00pm October 03 3 comments TWEET TALK Hold but for how long Economists expect the central bank to keep rates on hold today but there s less consensus on whether there are more cuts to come by Hannah Francis 12 01pm October 01 1 comment THE WEEK AHEAD David Jones is among a handful of companies to report in the coming week while US GDP and Germany s election result will be closely watched by Hannah Francis 10 57am September 20 THE WEEK AHEAD A busy week for the Reserve Bank with the release of board meeting minutes and its quarterly bulletin while the US Federal Reserve s September meeting will dominate offshore headlines by Hannah Francis 10 10am September 13 1 comment Australian security start up Bugcrowd raises 1 6 million Finds funds from both local and US capital firms with a former director of the NSA endorsing the start up by Hannah Francis 9 57am September 05 Australia s hidden ideas bank Risk aversion is a poor excuse for anaemic investment in Australian start ups With the potential to contribute 109 billion and 540 000 jobs to the economy over the next 20 years it s time to start cashing in by Hannah Francis 8 21am August 29 2 comments TWEET TALK Doves will cry Relatively stable local data coupled with a lower dollar are why there s near consensus in the Twittersphere the Reserve Bank will hold fire until later this year by Hannah Francis 11 44am June 04 Weaving social media into the sales pitch Businesses can no longer ignore social media and those that embed sophisticated social networking strategies across the board will be much better placed to take advantage of the evolving marketplace of the future by Hannah Francis 8 58am May 10 TWEET TALK Rates recess Experts in the Twittersphere largely agree interest rates won t budge today while an overvalued dollar and transitioning mining sector have played into predictions on future moves by Hannah Francis 1 17pm March 05 TWEET TALK Hold the line Most economists expect the Reserve Bank to keep rates unchanged today but there s division on where the bank will go from there by Hannah Francis 1 06pm February 05 The never ending retail red carpet Retail is doing its best to spoil customers rotten Data spills from customers but where it gets tricky is how to refine and use it all in pursuit of the golden return on relationship by Hannah Francis 7 30am November 25 3 comments Smooth online operators storm the high street The latest breed of retail disrupters are moving online apparel into the bricks and mortar space and bringing a leaner meaner business model with them by Hannah Francis 11 24am October 21

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/hannah-francis (2014-01-13)
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  • Apple's patent payout reduced | Business Spectator
    runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Is the EU about to abdicate climate leadership The rift over energy and climate policy is widening in Europe as politicians feel the pressure from the continent s ongoing economic crisis The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Apple s patent payout reduced 22 Nov 2013 12 55 PM Technology Industries Information Technology Jury reduces patent win over Samsung Apple says case about more than money You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Dow Jones Newswires Apple Inc s 1 billion patent win over Samsung Electronics Co is a bit smaller A jury on Thursday awarded Apple Inc 290 million in the retrial of the damages award from last year s patent infringement lawsuit against the Korean electronics giant Combined with the more than 600 million already awarded the new verdict shrinks the damages total to about 930 million In March US District Judge Lucy Koh overturned a jury s damage award for 13 devices at issue Apple originally had been awarded 1 05 billion The two companies have duked it out in courtrooms around the world for more than two years one of the most prominent in a series of patent battles in the smartphone industry The verdict comes three days after a federal appeals court gave Apple a new chance to present a case for why Samsung should be barred from selling 26 devices that a jury said infringed on patents held by the tech giant Most of the phones and tablets in question are no longer sold by Samsung But Apple argues that an injunction would allow the company to battle future infringement by Samsung newer devices We are disappointed by today s decision which is based in large part on a patent that the US Patent and Trademark Office has

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/22/technology/apples-patent-payout-reduced (2014-01-13)
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  • Coles and Woolworths face a hulking gorilla | Business Spectator
    implied in his speech Wesfarmers retail division after all goes much deeper than Coles to other potential Amazon rivals in Target Kmart and Officeworks Such is the rate of change at Amazon which now sells everything from TVs to furniture clothing and dry groceries as well as offering a Netflix like streaming service that it is hard to pinpoint the catalyst for Goyder s statements Perhaps he had noticed the roll out of the company s fresh grocery service in Seattle and Los Angeles and mulled the implications for Coles down the line More likely however is the probability he had caught wind of the imminent launch of amazon com au which started operation last week by offering Kindle related products For many this represents the start of the company taking the Australian market more seriously and a consequent expansion For retailers it means a sense of trepidation and they only need look at bookstores to understand the damage Amazon can wreak Next stop is likely to be a local fulfilment centre and although strong rumours last year of a search for a suitable warehouse site in Australia by Amazon executives have so far come to naught the local website could speed up this process The big problem for Australian retailers is that by the time Amazon launches a full scale assault here the online retailer will have further fine tuned its supply chain strategies A fresh sign of this was news in October of Amazon teaming with consumer goods manufacturer Procter Gamble in a deal that allows the retailer to set up shop within P G warehouses The Seattle based group is also reportedly involved in or nearing similar arrangements with several other firms including Kimberly Clark It remains to be seen whether the strategy will actually work as the cost reductions from reduced transport and the saving of more space in its warehouses for higher margin goods may be outweighed by an increase in the number of packages required to fulfil orders but it does highlight the retailer s unabashed ambition to one day dominate the dry grocery sector Importantly it also signifies strong relationships with key suppliers The same can t be considered a strong point for Coles and Woolworths in recent years despite progress with the signing of a grocery code of conduct this week Consumer goods makers in Australia have long been hurt by the bottleneck at the end of the supply chain which means that if you re not at Coles and Woolworths you have little chance of any significant market share in your category Amazon has the potential to shake that situation up and capitalise on the tension within the supply chain It doesn t however mean the online retailer is ready to burst onto the local scene and reap substantial profits though that won t worry the Jeff Bezos run group With cumulative profits over its lifetime of just US2 billion Amazon has never shown fear about not making a profit in the near term And that arguably makes it the scariest competitor out there The lack of definitive signs of rapid expansion in Australia however could see the Amazon gorilla on our doorstep for a few years before it tries to crash through In the meantime Goyder will be hoping his barricades hold Print this page More from Daniel Palmer 13 Jan DataRoom AM Sensis slice 10 Jan DataRoom AM Unclogging Clydesdale 09 Jan DataRoom AM Juicy deals 08 Jan Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice 08 Jan DataRoom AM Warrnambool wildcard Related articles 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Google s obey or perish rules of the internet 06 Jan Where the new jobs are 20 Dec iBuy shares rise on debut 20 Dec Roy Hill secures US700m loan More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Alan Kesby Thu 2013 11 21 09 20 Amazon profit reports are misleading Amazon had operating cash flow of 4 billion in the 12 months to September 2103 on turnover of 70 billion It is not a low margin operator Amazon reinvests free cash in the businesss a common strategy in USA to minimise tax and maximise capital gains in the share price bill not available Thu 2013 11 21 22 08 Yes Alan Amazon profit reports are misleading to avoid paying any tax They are under investigation in the EU for dodgy accounting and tax avoidance So let s invite them in to Australia You may or may not like Coles or Woolies but I am pretty sure that whatever superannuation fund you are in it has these shares in their your portfolio thus impacting your retirement plans Keep working because you will have to pay the extra tax that Amazon has just avoided paying sounds fair to me Frank lastName Thu 2013 11 21 09 49 I support local producers and farmers and refuse to buy at Coles or Woolies they rip off dairy farmers in WA and buy their eggs from Tasmania etc no thanks i support fresh n local Frank lastName Thu 2013 11 21 09 49 I support local producers and farmers and refuse to buy at Coles or Woolies they rip off dairy farmers in WA and buy their eggs from Tasmania etc no thanks i support fresh n local Josef Franek Thu 2013 11 21 11 08 Amazon is too restrictive whatever I want to buy they always refuse to ship to Australia I don t bother anymore with Amazon If they enter Australia they would have to beat into submission local quality brand distributors or sell grey imports There are already enough online shops doing that Hal Patrick Thu 2013 11 21 11 28 A more immediate threat to Wollies and Coles is Costco It will spread like measles while Amazon

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/21/information-technology/coles-and-woolworths-face-hulking-gorilla (2014-01-13)
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  • Information Technology | Business Spectator
    Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Information Technology Elon Musk s electric dreams His prized Model S is feeling the heat but Tesla chief Elon Musk is not one to recoil from challenges which he still expects will include electric aircraft and mass market electric cars by Daniel Palmer 10 44am November 14 3 comments Fears over leaked free trade draft Early Trans Pacific Partnership report said to favour big copyright patent owners 5 15am November 14 3 comments Stokes scolds Google over tax Seven chair says online competitors have major advantage by not paying taxes 3 45am November 14 Freelancer lures key investors from Facebook MYOB Seek Shares in the online marketplace for outsourcing will begin trading on the ASX on Friday with a who s who of online investors on its share register by Brett Cole 4 12pm November 13 Computershare unit in bribery probe Workers at US division sacked after paying bribes for inside information report says 4 18am November 13 UK banks in cyber war game Exercise to test banks defences against the mounting threat of online attack 1 23am November 13 Slack emails hurt business poll Business leaders highlight importance of good communication in contract deals 12 46am November 12 Telstra prices 500m local bond Conservative borrower chooses local market amid rising foreign currency borrowing costs 7 21am November 11 Starfish Ventures sees room for US funds The venture capital firm says there are plenty of good Australian entrepreneurs that need capital by Brett Cole 12 18pm November 08 Will Turnbull leapfrog Telstra s copper As broadband copper slowly corrodes all mobile broadband is looking like an increasingly strong competitor for customers who may later make the jump to fibre by Rob Burgess 8 25am November 07 22 comments Google chairman slams US spying Allegations suggest US govt activities potentially illegal Schmidt 12 01am November 05 Lighting a fire under Freelancer Evaluating Freelancer s revenue can be complicated but it s not hard to see the listed business turning 50 million in annual profit within five to seven years by Ben Shepherd 5 59pm November 01 1 comment Medical booking site mulls IPO or sale The online medical booking site 1stAvailable has yet to make a decision whether to proceed with an IPO or sell itself by Brett Cole 2 15pm November 01 Pop the fizz for Facebook s figures As Facebook beds down its online advertising dominance cost control and rising revenue per user have delivered a stunning set of third quarter numbers by Ben Shepherd 1 39pm October 31 Thiel Sequoia seek Down Under VC investments A plethora of US venture capital funds are on

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/industries/information-technology?page=1 (2014-01-13)
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  • Information Technology | Business Spectator
    moving operations overseas report 2 34pm January 08 3 comments Google s obey or perish rules of the internet When a fast growing and heavily backed lyrics website ran afoul of Google it effectively fell off the internet The 60 per cent drop in traffic was a chilly reminder of Google s power by Ben Shepherd 6 33am January 08 Where the new jobs are In the digital economy jobs in high growth tech industries are being centralised around company headquarters Cities that cannot foster these companies will lose out in the race for jobs by Paul McCarthy 7 27am January 06 8 comments iBuy shares rise on debut Shares in the e commerce company rose as much as 11 per cent in their ASX trading debut bucking a recent weak patch for IPOs by Brett Cole 4 50pm December 20 Roy Hill secures US700m loan Gina Rinehart s iron ore JV wins significant backing from US govt agency 9 21am December 20 The flipside to Flipboard fever The venture capital flowing to Flipboard shows the confidence investors have in media platforms but it s still unclear if they actually provide any real benefit to content creators by Ben Shepherd 6 53am December 13 1 comment Apple wins Samsung court battle Samsung loses latest claim first unfavourable ruling it has received in Korea 11 43pm December 12 dorsaVi shares fall on ASX debut The company which sells athletic monitoring equipment had a disappointing start on the ASX by Brett Cole 12 30pm December 11 Foxtel s triple play may be Telstra s bundle of joy Foxtel s triple play deal will put it in direct competition with Telstra its half owner But increased competition amid the NBN rollout may mean cannibalisation is the only way for Telstra to thrive by Stephen Bartholomeusz 5 41pm December 10 4 comments Taxi app ingogo gets more funding Australian start up now valued at 25m ahead of possible IPO report 2 26am December 10 Inquiry to look at e voting Senate voting changes also on the agenda in election review 11 49pm December 09 3 comments Fairfax trades Stayz for home improvement Fairfax s Stayz sell off may signal further divestments of underperforming digital assets such as RSVP in pursuit of capital to grow its Domain business and new content and events units by Ben Shepherd 6 28am December 06 6 comments Facebook lifts news presence Social media group enhances focus on real news in News Feed 2 08am December 04 Freelance workers hits and myths New research shows managers concerns over the commitment of independent contractors are misplaced with freelance workers showing high levels of enthusiasm and dedication to their clients by Ken Phillips 6 53am November 29 8 comments Is Bitcoin rolling towards longevity Media hype has fuelled the Bitcoin demand spiral towards bubble territory But rising Chinese demand and softening regulation also suggest it may be establishing itself as a serious currency by Daniel Palmer 11 11am November 28 4 comments

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/industries/information-technology?destination=taxonomy/term/3004 (2014-01-13)
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