archive-au.com » AU » B » BUSINESSSPECTATOR.COM.AU

Total: 739

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Industrial relations | Business Spectator
    s Spanish fleet took Leighton Wal King must be grinning at the final score of Leighton s internal battle His tribe eventually won with Spanish company ACS creeping its way into the power seat by Robert Gottliebsen 8 38am November 07 4 comments The making or breaking of Mr Infrastructure If vested construction interests succeed in smashing Victoria s anti cartel laws they ll be able to boost construction costs and absorb the money Tony Abbott has earmarked for infrastructure by Robert Gottliebsen 8 36am November 06 13 comments Why Sinodinos is hanging his job on super Arthur Sinodinos knows his role is to protect the current superannuation benefits He also knows the ATO needs to be straightened out on the rules for independent contractors by Robert Gottliebsen 7 10am October 21 7 comments Wealth and power combine in the Senate The Abbott government s ability to pass legislation will be greatly influenced by Australia s largest home builder Bob Day a keen fighter for small enterprise and self managed super funds by Robert Gottliebsen 8 10am October 08 32 comments Abbott s 12 point plan to transform Australia Part 2 The Abbott government will leave no stone unturned in its overhaul of the Australian economy Changes to IR and productivity are even more important than those highlighted yesterday but just as scarcely understood by Robert Gottliebsen 8 53am September 10 43 comments Coalition vows union crackdown Abetz aims to crush union friendly deals on government funded projects 2 06am September 04 19 comments NAB cuts 600 jobs report More job losses expected as bank chases 800 million in savings 5 11am August 29 1 comment Chevron s hot air over gas costs Poor management on site is to blame for Chevron s massive cost overruns not the Australian economy by Robert Gottliebsen 8 36am August 20 14 comments A four wheel terror for unions If GM workers sign up to a deal compatible with global manufacturing conditions miners and other manufacturers will have a precedent to remove union control No wonder the ACTU is alarmed by Robert Gottliebsen 7 57am July 15 12 comments Unions can t paint over a construction revolution The CFMEU s court victory against the Victorian government is a premature celebration Even if it stands an irreversible transformation of the building sector is underway by Ken Phillips 6 42am June 25 9 comments A potential clean slate for coal mining Private equity investors are looking to coal mines for their next big win If they can turnaround chronic mismanagement they ll set an example for other industries by Robert Gottliebsen 7 20am June 19 9 comments The union hand on the wheel that doomed Ford Ford s industrial relations agreements limited the capacity of managers to manage fatefully crippling the company And the mistakes looks set to be repeated by Ken Phillips 6 57am June 19 25 comments Increase in minimum wage bad for business ACCI Peter Anderson says modest increase still excessive 1 49pm

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/industries/industrial-relations?destination=taxonomy/term/121771 (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Where the new jobs are | Business Spectator
    Amazon has developed a famously efficient centralised global e commerce enterprise that ships to and trades in 66 countries around the world from Argentina to Venezuela yet without the need for the need for local operations sales or distribution staff in most of these locations Research based on current LinkedIn data indicates over 91 per cent of Amazon s 88 000 staff are located in only six of the countries where it has significant on the ground operations the US UK India Ireland China and Canada Similarly Google Facebook and most other online global ventures trade and derive revenue from customers in most countries around the world yet have staff and on the ground operations in only a select few of these As a new generation of companies like Sydney based Atlassian and Austin and Sydney based BigCommerce have clearly demonstrated without the expense of global sales staff you can not only sell and support consumer services online but also enterprise solutions globally and online from one or two well resourced hubs This is increasingly important for policymakers It means unless your city region or country fosters the creation of global digital economy enterprises the number of high value jobs available in your area is likely to shrink dramatically over the next decade And it s not just traditional industries where jobs are at risk November s Harvard Business Review chronicles the long term decline in employment of America s information industries After manufacturing the information sector has had the greatest employment contraction of any sector in the US in the past decade While online gravity is leading to many Jaguar jobs disappearing in Western countries it s not all bad news for the developing world The World Bank has said in its recent report Connecting to Work that the rise of open global online labour marketplaces such as Freelancer com oDesk and elance means that once connected to the internet many people in developing countries can have direct access to employment opportunities that were previously impossible Gazelles and Rocketships MIT economist David L Birch showed in the 1970s that the majority of national job growth and losses in the US came from enterprises with fewer than 100 employees Nearly 20 years on Birch refined his thesis to show not all small businesses are equal with only 4 per cent of these companies a high growth cohort he terms gazelles accounting for around 70 per cent of jobs created Gazelles are companies that routinely demonstrate consecutive double digit annual growth They are now seen by many as the engine room of future economic development Follow on research Employment effects of business dynamics Mice Gazelles and Elephants by Zoltan J Acs and Pamela Mueller has identified gazelles as only start ups with greater than 20 and less than 500 employees and only in large diversified metropolitan regions Many of these gazelles such as Google eBay and Freelancer com are fuelled by the winds of online gravity and also classify as rocketships Rocketships are a new generation of online high growth global enterprises defined as companies that grow from start up to US50 million in revenue in their first five years of operation Atlassian Facebook and Google all fit this definition In a 2009 article for the Wall Street Journal How Long Does It Take To Build A Technology Empire Scott Austin suggested that a previous generation of global technology companies such as Microsoft Oracle and SPSS haven t made it into the Rocketship club having taken between eight ten and 14 years respectively to reach US50 million of sales Employment is being reinvented and jobs being disrupted are reappearing in different settings and new global enterprises around the world Policymakers politicians and parents should be mindful of these changes to best position for employment in a new era of online gravity Paul McCarthy is writing a book entitled Online Gravity This article was originally published at The Conversation Read the original article Print this page Related articles 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Google s obey or perish rules of the internet 20 Dec iBuy shares rise on debut 20 Dec Roy Hill secures US700m loan 13 Dec The flipside to Flipboard fever More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy R Ambrose Raven Mon 2014 01 06 08 32 Who benefits Narrow expediency by Australian managers in flogging out outsourcing information technology will cause a permanent loss not only of those particulars tasks but cause a large number of strategically important software development project management and enterprise architecture roles to be permanently lost to Australians Such folly breaks up the traditional career path of junior technology employees Current skill shortages are one of the main reasons why organisations looked to outsource technology work So the refusal to plan and train creates a vicious cycle Outsourced roles may never return to Australia Low cost work is more likely to be transferred from India to such as the Philippines Indonesia and eventually Africa where governments can be relied on to ensure sweatshop labour by crushing Robert s pet hate the unions s457 visa workers from India are nevertheless a significant problem for the local IT sector Over the past decade the number of 457 workers in the ICT industry has grown dramatically because those brought into Australia under these arrangements are paid much less than equally skilled Australians as desired by business and the politicians they own This has in fact severely limited the opportunities and growth for many small to medium Australian businesses with skilled local resources Abbott wishes to open the s457 sweatshop coolie tap even more Rejoice JD Mon 2014 01 06 12 04 What he said 1 Kevin Nivek Mon 2014 01 06 14 24 Absolutely agree with R Ambrose The same can be said about

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/6/information-technology/where-new-jobs-are (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Paul McCarthy | Business Spectator
    expansion into the US Given its history of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories REVIEW Nokia Lumia 1520 The Nokia 1520 sports a number of key upgrades that bring it the Window s phone platform to parity with its Android competition But does this phablet do enough to sway attention from its rivals Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Is the EU about to abdicate climate leadership The rift over energy and climate policy is widening in Europe as politicians feel the pressure from the continent s ongoing economic crisis The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Paul McCarthy Where the new jobs are In the digital economy jobs in high growth tech industries are being centralised around company headquarters Cities that cannot foster these companies will lose out in the race for jobs by Paul McCarthy 7 27am January 06 8 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Is the EU about to abdicate climate leadership Barbara Lewis 5

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/paul-mccarthy (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The flipside to Flipboard fever | Business Spectator
    is flowing in regards to media The social news app has now raised in excess of 160 million over the past three years and claims user numbers of around 85 million An impressive takeup but surely given the volume of funds raised it s time for the service to start demonstrating the beginning of meaningful revenue potential The service like many other US media disruptors has focused on a build audience first then monetise approach Large venture capital rounds finance all this luxury which allows the service to continue to plough money into development and not worry too much about revenue It s a smart strategy in terms of valuation as well it can often works against start ups to focus on revenue early as many investors place value on future potential rather than demonstrated results The same week that Flipboard came close to a 1 billion valuation the new venture from the founders of technology news website All Things D did the same Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg partnered with Dow Jones to operate their website and events business but decided to part ways with Dow Jones and move the business under a new name across to NBC Universal Reports suggest that across advertising and events All Things D generates 14 million a year in revenue and 5 5 million in profit Even with these results reports suggest NBC Universal invested in the business at a 25 35 million valuation At best a 6x multiple Now All Things D is a niche business whereas Flipboard is a mass platform but it does show that investors are willing to bet more liberally on platforms rather than content creation It s the same thing we see with Spotify and the music industry Spotify is valued at close to 6 billion despite relying solely on the product developed by the record labels and their artists Record labels are not considered by investors to be as exciting investment prospects despite their significant value to services like Spotify YouTube and VEVO Case in point when analysts hypothesised about the prospect of Sony Corporation selling off its music assets it believed that they would be worth close to 5 billion based on annual revenue in excess of 5 5 billion and operating income of 450 million In 2012 Spotify generated 576 million in revenue and incurred a 77 million loss but ultimately is valued at a price higher than the total Sony Music business The fact that Flipboard is edging close to a 1 billion valuation without a demonstrated business model outlines the appetite for platform plays Flipboard founder Mike McCue has stated that Flipboard s primary goal is to help publishers make money from their original content via advertising Flipboard then wants to take a clip of that advertising revenue How that will work is unclear Will Flipboard become an advertising vendor itself Or will it want the content creators to sell the ads themselves and share the revenue with Flipboard Many publishers and

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/13/information-technology/flipside-flipboard-fever (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • dorsaVi shares fall on ASX debut | Business Spectator
    precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Is the EU about to abdicate climate leadership The rift over energy and climate policy is widening in Europe as politicians feel the pressure from the continent s ongoing economic crisis The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu dorsaVi shares fall on ASX debut Brett Cole 11 Dec 2013 12 30 PM DataRoom Equity Capital Markets Industries Information Technology The company which sells athletic monitoring equipment had a disappointing start on the ASX You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Shares in sports technology firm dorsaVi Ltd slumped by up to 11 per cent on their debut on Wednesday against a flat broader market the latest IPO to fall short of investor expectations Shares in the company that sells wireless sensor movement systems for athletes fell 4 5 cents to 35 5 cents at 1215 AEST after earlier rising as high as 43 cents The S P ASX 200 Index was down 0 2 per cent at 1218 AEST dorsaVi s IPO fully underwritten by Canaccord Genuity Australia Ltd raised 18 million through the sale of 41 25 million shares at 40 cents each But the company is loss making In the 12 months to June 30 2013 dorsaVi s sales revenue was 398 607 and it made a loss from continuing operations of 1 6 million dorsaVi was started in 2000 by Andrew and Dan Ronchi physiotherapists in private practice who counted an Australian Football League team as a client The brothers worked on developing a wireless sensor movement monitoring system that by 2008 had attracted an investment from Melbourne based venture capital firm Starfish Ventures Starfish has a 50 per cent stake in dorsaVi after the IPO Print this page More from Brett Cole 13 Jan Singh behind key KKR deal 13 Jan Financial Index to buy Centric Wealth for

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/11/equity-capital-markets/dorsavi-shares-fall-asx-debut (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Foxtel's triple play may be Telstra's bundle of joy | Business Spectator
    Foxtel s without discounting them but prevented Foxtel from pursuing a genuine triple play offer From Telstra s perspective the expectation that the Coalition government would accelerate the rollout of the NBN would have altered its thinking In an NBN environment it is inevitable that Telstra will be a loser amid a more level playing field for telecommunications retailers The rate at which it loses customers and earnings and the magnitude of the losses will matter Optus TPG iiNet and others are putting together customer bases infrastructure and product offerings to compete far more vigorously If Telstra is to be cannibalised it makes sense that it loses share to a company that it has a stake in rather than to competitors To the extent that Foxtel does pick up some of its customers it will keep the wholesale margin and get 50 per cent of the profits that Foxtel generates Foxtel has long desired the capacity to offer telecommunications services It offers additional revenue streams to leverage its existing sales and billings platforms and therefore additional margin and profits at incremental cost Importantly the bundling of other services with its core pay TV product should make its customers stickier Given the high cost of acquiring and servicing new customers one of the challenges for all subscription businesses is customer churn Foxtel s churn rate is high more than 14 per cent of its customers leave the service each year It is costly given that its penetration of Australian households has been stagnant at about 30 per cent for some years Foxtel has been able to steadily increase average revenues per user by introducing new products cut down versions of the service Foxtel Lite and a new range of IP products and on demand services Still it hasn t been able to enlarge its overall customer base If it can reduce the churn or get some momentum into its customer numbers there could be a significant impact on its bottom line The overseas experience of triple play offers suggests this could work Goldman Sachs has estimated that a triple play offer could add 130 million to Foxtel s earnings before interest tax depreciation and amortisation by 2020 and increase its value by a cool 1 billion Like Telstra Foxtel would also be watching its competitors knowing that they will be an increasing threat as the NBN rolls out Optus and iiNet already offer the Fetch TV service a cut down and much cheaper pay TV service that is starting to build a reasonably sized customer base There is also the spectre of the imminent full scale entry of the US giant Netflix whose on demand internet streaming service is changing the landscape of the US television sector Netflix has a declared strategy of expanding internationally Some of Foxtel s more recent IP products Foxtel on T box Foxtel Play Foxtel Go and Presto were designed as pre emptive launches with Netflix in mind It has also ratcheted up the pressure on

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/10/information-technology/foxtels-triple-play-may-be-telstras-bundle-joy (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Fairfax trades Stayz for home improvement | Business Spectator
    significant change and competition in particular the emergence of Airbnb com which has raised north of US300 million or 331 4 million and other well heeled international competitors and the company found itself in a more competitive environment than in previous years The global resources of new owner HomeAway should assist Stayz in this area The 220 million sale price represents a 214 million gain for Fairfax at a very commendable 16 8 times multiple The two key questions as a result are what will the company use these funds for and what does the sale of Stayz mean for the future of the shrinking Digital Transactions group within the company Beginning with the latter the sale of Stayz takes a large chunk out of the revenue and earnings of the Digital Transactions group Stayz represented approximately one third of the group s revenue of 75 8 million and EBITDA of 31 3 The Digital Transactions group includes Stayz InvestSmart which Fairfax sold back in August for 7 million RSVP Online Marketing Group Tenderlink Australian Property Monitors and Commerce Australia Online dating site RSVP while operating in a different market to Stayz confronts very similar operating challenges Like Stayz it has previously contributed strongly to Fairfax s overall business and has managed to build market share in a competitive but not hyper competitive market But that environment is changing as overseas entrants such as e harmony spend up big to effectively buy market share knowing the dating market is heavily reliant on expensive above the line advertising and marketing to compel customers into action Overall the Digital Transactions business unit saw EBITDA drop 9 per cent in the last financial year and RSVP more than likely would have played a large role in this Fairfax and its advisors must be looking seriously at whether they can find an acquirer for RSVP given its best days are most likely behind it The Domain business unit represents a more comfortable home for Australian Property Monitors and Commerce Australia But given Fairfax s recent strategic moves into content and events Online Marketing Group and Tenderlink don t appear to offer any real long term strategic benefit to the wider organisation s purpose Nevertheless they are established solid assets that would be of interest to competitors focusing in on these specific areas Fairfax Chief Executive Officer Greg Hywood must be wondering what value could be fetched for the sale of RSVP Tenderlink and Online Marketing Group and how these funds could be used to best deliver on his strategic goal of building and profitability monetising its large scale and highly engaged news media audiences in Australia and New Zealand RSVP in particular would be an attractive acquisition prospect for an international dating company looking to quickly scale in Australia such as a match com because of its large user base and customer data as well as for a current competitor such as e harmony to that s looking to take a dominant position Then

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/6/information-technology/fairfax-trades-stayz-home-improvement (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Is Bitcoin rolling towards longevity? | Business Spectator
    Bitcoins for a 25 pizza three years ago If you factor in the current value of one Bitcoin that pizza has cost over 10 million for Hanyecz in future value One hopes it was a good pizza Given most of the people buying into Bitcoin believe strongly in its future worth the argument can be made that until the price settles down it will be no more than a faux currency serving as an investment Still press coverage of breaching the 1000 mark will no doubt lead to another wave of demand in the coming days even if there is a brief pullback That s what happens when there s a mob mentality the fear of missing out drives a rally of unthinkable proportions The real question we need answered now is whether it really is a bubble or the start of a steady move toward cryptocurrency Perhaps it s both Print this page Is Bitcoin rolling towards longevity Daniel Palmer 28 Nov 2013 11 11 AM 4 Technology Industries Information Technology Markets Currency More from Daniel Palmer 13 Jan DataRoom AM Sensis slice 10 Jan DataRoom AM Unclogging Clydesdale 09 Jan DataRoom AM Juicy deals 08 Jan Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice 08 Jan DataRoom AM Warrnambool wildcard Related articles 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Google s obey or perish rules of the internet 06 Jan Where the new jobs are 20 Dec iBuy shares rise on debut 20 Dec Roy Hill secures US700m loan More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Log in to post comments Comments Bitcoins are bubble of tulip Submitted by Sam Richards on Thu 2013 11 28 12 59 Bitcoins are bubble of tulip proportions It has no basis of value There is a limit to the number of Bitcoins by design You create Bitcoins by running a hotted up PC for weeks to mine for Botcoins None of those things are any basis for a world wide currency at all may as well be shiny shells The basic idea of the currency may have legs but not how it was created out of thin air Log in to post comments I m with you Sam Anyone Submitted by Eddy Ward on Fri 2013 11 29 10 39 I m with you Sam Anyone who got in early can pat themselves on the back but it smells like an onion to me I won t be selling my luxurious house in Amsterdam for one tulip bulb Log in to post comments A currency that can so Submitted by Michael Judd on Thu 2013 11 28 14 12 A currency that can so easily become the plaything of speculators is hardly somewhere you want to store your wealth Sure bitcoins might go up to 10 000 or 100 000 due to the tulip mania happening right now but once the bubble inevitably

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/28/information-technology/bitcoin-rolling-towards-longevity (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive