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  • State-federal Gonski agreement crucial: Brumby | Business Spectator
    transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu State federal Gonski agreement crucial Brumby 28 Feb 2013 3 10 PM HR Education Politics Industries Resources and Energy National Affairs Chair of COAG Reform Council says funding squabble was expected You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP The squabble between states and the commonwealth over who will pay what to implement the hefty Gonski schools funding reforms was to be expected new COAG Reform Council chair John Brumby says But he believes it s crucial for the country s future that an agreement is reached on the proposed overhaul of school funding which will cost about 6 5 billion a year If you were writing a school report card you d say Australia s performance is satisfactory but mixed could do much better Mr Brumby a former teacher and ALP Victorian premier said It is crucial that at the end of the day there is an agreement on the way forward because the reality is we need to be better in education But Mr Brumby said the ongoing debate between premiers and the prime minister was reasonable given the large sums of money involved Would you want great big reforms like national disability insurance or education reforms to go through without debate It s big change big reform big expenditure of money and it s reasonable to say there s going to be a fair bit of debate between the commonwealth and the states before there s a final conclusion Mr Brumby said The COAG Reform Council will report on progress on improving teacher quality in July and the overall education performance in November It will also report this year on youth attainment and transitions The CRC which provides regular report cards on the outcomes of Council of Australian Governments decisions this week completed a report on coal seam gas to be published next month The report looks at the establishment of an independent scientific committee on CSG and protocols to be put in place by each

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/2/28/national-affairs/state-federal-gonski-agreement-crucial-brumby (2014-01-13)
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  • SA premier backs Gonski reforms | Business Spectator
    competition But does this phablet do enough to sway attention from its rivals Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu SA premier backs Gonski reforms 25 Feb 2013 4 53 PM HR Education Politics Industries Weatherill urges states and territories to support national plan You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP South Australian Premier Jay Weatherill has urged all states to get behind the federal government s national plan for school funding Prime Minister Julia Gillard will sit down with the state and territory leaders in April to discuss a new plan to inject an extra 6 5 billion a year into schools as proposed under the Gonski review The commonwealth is expected to make a formal offer of its funding share this week However Victoria has announced it will go it alone saying it could deliver better outcomes than the commonwealth s one size fits all approach Western Australia and Queensland also have expressed doubts about the plan But Mr Weatherill said the Gonski reforms were about ensuring every child had every chance to succeed For the first time in the nation s history it brings the commonwealth in as a serious partner for funding public education the premier said Every state and territory minister should get on board in making it happen Print this page Related articles 17 Dec List of IPO debut flops grows 16 Dec Govt mulls

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/2/25/education/sa-premier-backs-gonski-reforms (2014-01-13)
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  • Abbott has held own school funding talks | Business Spectator
    and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Abbott has held own school funding talks 25 Feb 2013 3 13 PM HR Education Politics Industries National Affairs Oppn joins with WA Vic to reject govt s one size fits all approach You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP Opposition Leader Tony Abbott says he has held his own talks with state premiers on school funding and called on the prime minister to stop playing politics Prime Minister Julia Gillard will meet state and territory leaders in April to discuss a new plan to inject an extra 6 5 billion a year into schools proposed under the Gonski review The commonwealth is expected to make a formal offer of its funding share this week However Victoria has announced it will go it alone saying it could deliver better outcomes than the commonwealth s one size fits all approach Western Australia and Queensland also have expressed doubts about the plan Mr Abbott has told reporters about a number of discussions with a number of premiers on education They are determined to do the right thing by their schools Mr Abbott said But like me they want to see what the specific commitments are that the prime minister is going to make and so far it s been all talk and no real action It s up to the prime minister to stop playing politics to stop the blame game to be consultative to sit down with them and to try to make a difference Mr Abbott said Labor came to office in 2007 promising an education revolution but overall school results had gone backwards They re much better at spending money than making a difference he said describing the government as making gimmicky announcements WA set to follow Vic in opting out of Gonski Western Australia appears set to follow Victoria and opt out of the government s proposed Gonski school reforms if Premier Colin Barnett is re elected in March Mr Barnett said he believed the federal government was a small player in education and heavily criticised Ms Gillard s style of negotiation with the states We have never indicated we would sign up to Gonski Mr Barnett said If the federal

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/2/25/national-affairs/abbott-has-held-own-school-funding-talks (2014-01-13)
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  • States to be informed of Gonski funding costs | Business Spectator
    nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu States to be informed of Gonski funding costs 25 Feb 2013 7 38 AM HR Education Politics Industries Garrett expects to be able to inform states of specifics shortly You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP with a staff reporter States will know within weeks how much more the commonwealth expects them to pay for schools The Gonski school funding overhaul calls for the states territories and commonwealth combined to stump up an extra 6 5 billion a year But many of the states have been wary saying they didn t know if they could sign up to the plan before finding out how much they were expected to pay Over the weekend Victoria announced it would go it alone on school funding reform saying it could deliver better outcomes than the commonwealth s one size fits all approach Western Australia and Queensland have also expressed doubts about the federal government s national plan for school improvement Federal Schools Minister Peter Garrett said he expected to be able to let the states committed to the reforms know what would be involved shortly In this week and the weeks ahead we will be sitting down and specifically going through both what we believe are the necessary components of the plan and also the likely offers that will come on to the table for us to pay our fair share he told ABC radio He said the commonwealth would seek the same from the states in return But he declined to say how much extra money would go to schools next year when the new Gonski system comes into effect It is understood it will take several years for the full 6 5 billion annual boost to go

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/2/25/education/states-be-informed-gonski-funding-costs (2014-01-13)
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  • WEEKEND READ: Brand America | Business Spectator
    s a shortage of empty containers Exports of a product that doesn t have to be packed onto seagoing boxes are also rising Naming rights for universities libraries and sports teams have always been a great revenue source for prestigious outfits Status hungry rich people and corporations will pay top dollar to associate their name with a prestigious place or organisation In March Stephen Schwarzman of the Blackstone Group donated US100 million to the New York Public Library in exchange for having the midtown Manhattan landmark re named for him The lion statues outside will retain their own names As the geography of global wealth rapidly shifts with rich American institutions becoming suddenly poorer and impressive pockets of wealth bulging around the globe naming rights have quickly evolved into a major export The trend is most evident in sports Last year Barclays PLC the big British bank paid a reported US400 million as part of a deal with the New Jersey Nets in which it acquired naming rights for the arena Frank Gehry is designing for the team in downtown Brooklyn Other interesting manifestations can be seen in the groves of acad eme where industrialists financiers and corporations each year swap billions in cash for prestige While the American brand may be tarnished in foreign policy Iraq financial management subprime and even basketball the 2004 Olympics US higher education still has a sterling international brand said Peter Frumkin professor of public affairs at the University of Texas People love to have their names associated with leading research universi ties It was true of 19th century steel mag nates such as Andrew Carnegie And it s true of 21st century steel magnates The Brazilian company Vale the world s second largest iron ore miner has a mammoth market capitalization of about US180 billion but a minuscule public profile in America In late April Vale announced it was establishing the Vale Columbia Centre on Sustainable International Investment at Columbia University to promote learning teaching policy oriented research and practical work within the foreign direct investment FDI In exchange for making a FDI of US1 5 million Vale gets its name on an Ivy League institute and its executives get to rub shoulders with bigwigs like Jeffrey Sachs head of Columbia s Earth Institute Just as companies seeking to boost sales must dispatch emissaries to foreign markets university development has expanded far beyond the Forbes 400 American university presidents today are all over the place in China India the Persian Gulf doing the same things that presidents did when they went to Silicon Valley in the 1990s said Scott Jaschik a founder and editor of Inside Higher Ed That is to say the presidents are buttering up alumni and shmoozing with rich locals whose children are shopping for college The purchasers of naming rights especially those from emerging markets who are seeking a greater role on the global stage are less interested in imprinting their names on buildings à la Schwarzman and more

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/2/22/resources-and-energy/weekend-read-brand-america (2014-01-13)
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  • Daniel Gross | Business Spectator
    5 42pm February 22 WEEKEND READ Wal Mart goes to Washington Wal Mart s clumsy attempts to influence the presidential race by warning workers about the perils of an Obama presidency are just the latest in a string of poor politicals manoeuvres by Daniel Gross 5 37pm February 22 WEEKEND READ Death of the credit economy Americans consumers got used to living large on credit but following the sub prime crisis they have had to get used to the pain of paying once again by Daniel Gross 5 25pm February 22 WEEKEND READ The decoupling myth The idea that the global economy had decoupled from the US economy is being well and truly debunked by the credit crisis by Daniel Gross 5 22pm February 22 WEEKEND READ Don t blame the poor Some critics are blaming the US credit crisis on laws that encouraged banks to lend to America s poor and minority groups But Wall Street only has itself to blame for this disaster by Daniel Gross 5 10pm February 22 WEEKEND READ The hidden jobless The unemployment rate in the United States doesn t really look that bad until you consider the vast number of workers who are underutilised and not contributing to the economy at large by Daniel Gross 5 04pm February 22 WEEKEND READ Fearing fear itself Fear of fear has led to an ongoing digital run on financial institutions and the capitulation of many astute investors But when fear has reached fever pitch in the past it has generally indicated that the market has reached its bottom by Daniel Gross 11 49pm October 17 WEEKEND READ Mark to market melee The chief cause of the credit market meltdown is not folly or reckless lending it s an accounting rule by Daniel Gross 11 11pm April 04 WEEKEND READ The rise of American incompetence The US used to be the home of the world s most skillful entrepreneurs and managers Now its a laughing stock What happened by Daniel Gross 9 38am March 23 Understimulated Americans Americans are about to get US100 billion in tax rebates The government hopes they ll spend the cash quickly and stimulate the economy but that s no certainty by Daniel Gross 7 17am February 09 Upside to recession If you delve deeply into the black economic clouds it might be possible to detect a lining that looks a little like silver by Daniel Gross 6 35am January 19 Page 1 WEEKEND READ The inner skinflint The US economy is sluggish yet working class retailer Wal Mart is doing well The reasons for their success including consumers shifting downmarket will cheer some local retailers by Daniel Gross 6 36pm February 22 WEEKEND READ The new New Deal Franklin Roosevelt saved American capitalism after the Great Depression with his New Deal measures Seventy years later the Bush Administration is relying on the infrastructure FDR created to help survive the sub prime mess by Daniel Gross 6 27pm February 22 Weekend Read The

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/daniel-gross (2014-01-13)
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  • WEEKEND READ: The childcare myth | Business Spectator
    with some regions and sectors of the Australian economy frustrating many employers While retention of older workers and the use of migrant workers can address some of these shortfalls another obvious factor is the workforce participation of women who have left paid employment to have children In this respect the relationship between child care and the participation of mothers in the paid workforce is frequently raised it seems obvious that if child care was more affordable more mothers would work Indeed it seems so obvious that this statement is repeatedly made without providing any supporting evidence Governments have embraced this argument But statistical and empirical evidence on the strength of the association between female labour force participation and the cost of child care tell a somewhat different story National statistics on child care spending and female labour force participation rates suggest that the relationship works in the opposite direction Most of the increase in labour force participation rates of women aged 25 34 and 35 44 occurred during the 1980s while government spending on child care escalated in the 1990s Women were entering the paid workforce in increasing numbers well before substantial child care subsidies were introduced This created a demand for subsidised child care which was not denied Commonwealth government spending on child care has increased by 4 000 per cent in real terms since 1980 Empirical research on child care costs and labour supply provides further evidence that the relationship is far from straightforward Of the 24 most commonly cited studies on child care costs and labour supply 23 produced elasticity estimates in the range generally defined as inelastic According to this evidence and to Australian economists who have reviewed it the association between child care costs and maternal employment is weak and economically insignificant There is a stronger but still moderate effect for low income and single mothers but in general decreasing the cost of child care has only a marginally positive effect on labour supply So what does this tell us Firstly mothers take more than the cost of care into account when making decisions about work Surveys of Australian mothers have found that personal preferences and attitudes to parenting are the main factors in whether and when women begin paid work after having children Secondly it confirms the crowding out effect of child care subsidies on informal child care identified in child care usage statistics Increased subsidies for formal child care encourage parents who are already working to move their children from informal to formal child care The result is a large increase in formal child care usage and subsidies but only a small increase in labour force participation Finally it tells us that government spending on child care is unlikely to pay for itself Economists at the Melbourne Institute modeled the effect on labour supply of increasing the 30 per cent Child Care Tax Rebate to 50 per cent a policy the Labour party took to the last federal election and introduced this year

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/2/22/australian-news/weekend-read-childcare-myth (2014-01-13)
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  • Jennifer Buckingham | Business Spectator
    disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories REVIEW Nokia Lumia 1520 The Nokia 1520 sports a number of key upgrades that bring it the Window s phone platform to parity with its Android competition But does this phablet do enough to sway attention from its rivals Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Jennifer Buckingham WEEKEND READ The childcare myth Australia has a labour shortage which is why the government should pour money into childcare and get mothers back to work right Wrong says a new report by Jennifer Buckingham 5 42pm February 22 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators REVIEW Nokia Lumia 1520 Krishan Sharma 7 min ago The Nokia 1520 sports a number

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/jennifer-buckingham (2014-01-13)
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