archive-au.com » AU » B » BUSINESSSPECTATOR.COM.AU

Total: 739

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Zachary Shahan | Business Spectator
    06 3 comments SolarWorld breaks 1GW with Bosch Solar acquisition SolarWorld started the solar trade war now it has entered the gigawatt league with its acquisition of Bosch Solar Energy s manufacturing plants Speculation is that it didn t pay a cent in cash for them by Zachary Shahan 12 57pm December 02 Gates has another punt on clean tech Bill Gates joins Sun Microsystems venture capitalist in another clean energy investment this time backing power management firm Varentec by Zachary Shahan 3 32pm October 03 1 comment Tesla s insane stock surge Even Elon Musk has seemed to suggest his electric car company is grossly overvalued So why are people still investing in Tesla by Zachary Shahan 9 26am October 03 4 comments Middle East renewables targets weak or significant Put in perspective the current clean energy targets in the Gulf region are tame but they promise to be the start of something much bigger by Zachary Shahan 7 10am July 11 Tesla s battery swapping push The latest development at Tesla involves the opening of battery swapping stations where customers can change their battery in the time it takes to fill a tank with petrol by Zachary Shahan 10 41am June 24 Solar A disruptive technology By graphing the price of solar against that of natural gas retail electricity and crude oil over the past two decades it is clear that the renewable tech is set to shake things up for the better by Zachary Shahan 9 21am May 07 2 comments The reasons behind the latest EV collapse US electric carmaker Coda last week filed for bankruptcy protection and it s not hard to see why by Zachary Shahan 9 37am May 06 1 comment A double take on smart markets The smart home and smart cities markets aimed at making our technologies homes and cities more intelligent are set to double by 2017 a new report says by Zachary Shahan 11 19am April 16 A closer look at the world s largest CSP plant The world s largest concentrating solar power plant opened yesterday in the UAE a sign of the solar power boom ahead for the Middle East by Zachary Shahan 10 16am March 18 2 comments Shell s solar shout out Oil giant Shell sees solar as the world s leading energy source in around 50 years in one of its two energy scenarios Yet neither scenario is particularly optimistic for tackling dangerous climate change by Zachary Shahan 11 22am March 04 Europe s great fossil fuel exit UBS analysts project that because of a surge in renewables 30 of Europe s fossil fuel capacity needs to be shut by 2017 to restore utilities profitability by Zachary Shahan 1 14pm January 06 3 comments SolarWorld breaks 1GW with Bosch Solar acquisition SolarWorld started the solar trade war now it has entered the gigawatt league with its acquisition of Bosch Solar Energy s manufacturing plants Speculation is that it didn t pay a cent in

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/zachary-shahan (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive


  • RET puts pressure on energy prices: PM | Business Spectator
    per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu RET puts pressure on energy prices PM 19 Dec 2013 7 51 AM 3 Climate Policy Politics Renewable energy Renewables target adding significant price pressures Macfarlane laments supply equation You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP and a staff reporter Prime Minister Tony Abbott wants Australia to be an affordable energy superpower and says a review into the renewable energy target RET will look at the pressure it s placing on domestic prices Mr Abbott on Wednesday announced a taskforce into the manufacturing sector which would among other things examine ways to significantly drive down power prices to ease the cost of production When asked about the review of the Renewable Energy Target he said it was inducing pretty significant price pressures He then went on to say that Australia had few competitive advantages in manufacturing other than energy stating we should be an energy superpower cheap energy ought to be one of our comparative advantages Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane also commented that with coal fired power stations operating well below capacity there was a need to review a scheme that would induce further additional supply into the electricity market To be adding large quantities of generation into that situation has to be questioned he said The RET review process will go through those things He said it made no sense that coal fired power companies were producing energy at costs cheaper than five years ago but manufacturers were still paying double The federal government will next year review the bipartisan RET that aims to ensure 20 per cent of Australia s electricity comes from renewable sources by 2020 There is strong evidence the target will be well exceeded and critics including some within the government warn the RET will unnecessarily drive up retail power bills Mr Abbott said the government supported the sensible use of renewable energy but times had changed since the former Howard government helped establish the RET We ve got to accept though that in the changed circumstances of today the renewable energy target is causing pretty significant price

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/19/policy-politics/ret-puts-pressure-energy-prices-pm (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Abbott: RET adding 'significant price pressures' | Business Spectator
    in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Abbott RET adding significant price pressures 18 Dec 2013 1 44 PM 4 Climate Policy Politics Renewable energy Solar energy Wind power Prime Minister indicates concern that renewables scheme adding to manufacturing costs You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter In a press conference today about assisting the manufacturing sector in light of the closure of Holden Prime Minister Tony Abbott was asked about the review of the Renewable Energy Target In response he said it was inducing pretty significant price pressures He then went on to say that Australia had few competitive advantages in manufacturing other than energy stating we should be an energy superpower cheap energy ought to be one of our comparative advantages Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane also commented that with coal fired power stations operating well below capacity there was a need to review a scheme that would induce further additional supply into the electricity market Print this page Related articles 13 Jan Protesters block NSW coal mine 13 Jan Hunt firm on RET 10 Jan Solar and wind competitive with fossil fuels Gov t economist 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy John Inglis Wed 2013 12 18 13 53 Uhh isn t the whole idea of a RET to reduce coal use simon holmes a court Wed 2013 12 18 14 06 aren t large energy users largely exempt from paying for the RET using PECs http www factsfightback org au is the ret responsible for the decline of australian manufacturing check the facts it d be interesting to know

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/18/renewable-energy/abbott-ret-adding-significant-price-pressures (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The base debate holding renewables hostage | Business Spectator
    electricity systems with 80 100 per cent renewable electricity RE refutes this traditional assumption The simple conception of balancing baseload demand with baseload supply over a 24 hour period is outdated in the context of a RE future It was appropriate when inflexible baseload power stations coal or nuclear were the only choice for 24 hour power However when large penetrations of RE are integrated into the grid baseload power stations are not needed and their inflexibility becomes a liability The computer simulations show that baseload demand can be supplied reliably by a mix of RE sources none of which is strictly speaking a baseload power station as shown in the figure As originally pointed out by David Mills it s more relevant to speak of a mix of flexible and variable RE power stations The output of a flexible station can be varied rapidly as required Furthermore a flexible technology is dispatchable meaning it can be switched on rapidly unlike a coal fired or nuclear power station and its electricity can be fed into the grid upon demand with a high degree of certainty The following renewable electricity systems are flexible to varying degrees a gas turbine with an assured source of fuel derived from biomass organic materials a hydro electric station with a large dam a geothermal power station and a concentrated solar thermal power station with thermal storage As with any definition there are grey areas The flexibility of an RE source with storage increases with the amount of storage On the other hand wind solar PV without storage and run of river hydro are much less flexible and are classified as variable sources Although the electrical outputs of variable power stations can be decreased when required they cannot be increased beyond the level offered by weather or flow conditions at the time In other words they cannot be dispatched reliably but that does not matter if they are part of a mix with flexible renewable power stations Some people label variable RE technologies as intermittent I avoid this term because it can be misleading implying incorrectly that the large scale renewable electricity production generally cuts off abruptly when the wind drops or a cloud blocks the sun While the output of a single wind turbine or solar PV module may indeed be intermittent in this sense a wind farm spanning tens of kilometres and a solar power station spanning a kilometre or so will take much longer to cut off A system of geographically dispersed wind farms and solar power stations may take many hours Furthermore short term changes in wind and sunshine can be predicted quite well from weather observations The challenge for a predominantly RE system is to supply the peaks in demand not baseload and this can be achieved with both geographic dispersion and a mix of flexible and variable power stations The concept of flexibility can be extended to the transmission network and to demand management as well as shown by the

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/18/energy-markets/base-debate-holding-renewables-hostage (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Mark Diesendorf | Business Spectator
    energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Mark Diesendorf The base debate holding renewables hostage Renewable energy can t meet baseload requirements in its present form they say But green power provides a high degree of certainty only peak demand is in question by Mark Diesendorf 10 42am December 18 2 comments Even under Abbott coal fired electricity has no future Renewable energy is set to displace coal as the more economically competitive energy option even with carbon capture and storage development and no price on emissions by Mark Diesendorf 12 12pm September 11 14 comments Why 100 per cent renewables is possible and affordable Thousands of computer simulations of 100 per cent renewable electricity in the National Electricity Market show that a mix of already available renewable energy tech can achieve the same reliability as fossil fuelled systems by Mark Diesendorf 8 42am April 11 5 comments How we can pursue 100 renewables Cost is not preventing Australia from pursuing a Denmark like 100 per cent renewable future Instead it is political will that is holding us back but that does not mean we shouldn t consider the best way to move forward by Mark Diesendorf 10 09am June 26 A peak at Australia s energy potential Renewable energy mixes can provide the same reliability in meeting demand as the existing fossil fuelled system We just need to get the planning right by Mark Diesendorf 9 34am March 07 A cheaper path to 100 renewables Like last year s ZCA report new UNSW research has found that Australia s power needs could be met using 100 renewable energy The UNSW report however proposes an even cheaper solution by Mark Diesendorf 7 36am October 21 The base debate holding renewables hostage Renewable energy can t meet baseload requirements in its present form they say But green power provides a high degree of certainty only peak demand is in question by Mark Diesendorf 10 42am December 18 2 comments Even under Abbott coal fired electricity has no future Renewable energy is set to displace coal as the more economically competitive energy option even with carbon capture and storage development and no price on emissions by Mark Diesendorf 12

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/mark-diesendorf (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Clean energy's small gains on the 2013 battlefield | Business Spectator
    year indeed was the decision in March by German utility RWE hitherto one of the big players in European renewable energy deployment to cut its clean energy spending in half from 2014 followed by moves to cut hundreds of jobs in its renewables arm Innogy and to abandon development of the 1 2GW Atlantic Array offshore wind farm Over in the US the Edison Electric Institute a trade group representing utilities argued for a review of net metering rules on the basis that they unfairly shift costs from solar homes to non solar homes and in line with this Arizona s regulator agreed last month that the largest utility in the state could charge a monthly fee to customers who install PV panels on their roofs In Australia new Prime Minister Tony Abbott won an election in September promising to repeal the country s carbon trading system In Japan in November the government greatly weakened its emissions target changing it from a 25 per cent cut from 1990 levels by 2020 to a 3 8 per cent cut from 2005 levels by 2020 In the formerly booming wind power market of Romania in June the government approved legislation that would hold back the award of green certificates to wind and solar projects an effective retroactive cut in support for existing projects In the UK Prime Minister David Cameron promised to roll back the green levies in heated exchanges in the House of Commons this autumn later allegedly referring to them in private as green crap It turned out that he was talking about measures to help pay for insulation in low income homes rather than about support for renewable energy yet by that time investor confidence was shaken Still as with the Russian army after the Battle of Borodino clean energy has been regrouping and demonstrating signs of remarkable resilience There have been numerous signs of clean energy moving into the mainstream and becoming so entrenched that whatever some utilities might hope for there really will be no returning to the old way of doing things Here are a few examples The first is from Jordan where last month the International Finance Corporation led a group of lenders providing US221 million for a 117MW wind farm trumpeting the fact that it would produce electricity at a price up to 25 per cent less than that of thermal power The second is from the UK where the government agreed in October a 35 year strike price of 92 50 MWh for a proposed 3 2GW nuclear plant to be built at Hinkley Point by 2023 This price is above the 90 MWh the same government is offering onshore wind for just 15 years for projects built five years earlier than that The offer for photovoltaic plants commissioned in 2018 2019 is 100 only a few pounds above that for nuclear four to five years later The third is from Spain where this month Bloomberg News reported on how a local developer Grupo Enerpro has completed the country s first megawatt scale PV park without any public subsidies near Seville In Brazil the average winning bid in the most recent auction of wind capacity was US54 97 MWh one of the lowest wholesale electricity prices for any technology anywhere in the world The Midwest of the US is seeing power purchase agreements signed at US25 MWh exclude the impact of the Production Tax Credit and that is an unsubsidised price of US47 MWh lower than the levelised cost of a new gas plant even with the US s low gas prices Perhaps the most remarkable sign that clean energy is not dead long live clean energy to mix my historical analogies has been the remarkable rebound in the value of clean energy share prices with the NEX index up by 46 per cent so far this year and 73 per cent since its low in July 2012 as investors have realised that the painful restructuring of the supply side of the industry is drawing to a close and the demand side is in robust good health And so to our main business assessing how I did with my 10 predictions published at the end of January Here they are with my scrupulously fair self assessed marks allocated in consultation with Bloomberg New Energy Finance chief editor Angus McCrone 1 Recovery in clean energy investment Whoops The final figures for 2013 are not yet crunched and more deals will no doubt come to light between now and the publication of our annual data in January though it is already pretty clear that 2013 will see a lower total for world investment in clean energy defined here as renewables excluding large hydro but including energy smart technologies than 2012 s US281 billion and lower still than 2011 s record of US317 billion The figure for the first three quarters of this year was US143 billion though this excludes research and development spending which we include in the annual figures From the standpoint of mid December it does look as though the 2013 total will finish up around the US250 billion mark some 10 per cent down on last year That is still a lot of money and five times the 2004 figure yet it is a disappointment for sure Some of the detail of that prediction nevertheless we got right I said in January that I expected a recovery in clean energy share price valuations enough to bring about an increase in public market investment from 2012 s miserable total I justified this partly on the view that the solar sector would be getting closer to viewing the light at the end of the tunnel when painful excess capacity gives way to something closer to balance between supply and demand Public market investment is in fact likely to do even better than expected the first three quarters producing 43 per cent more equity raising than in the whole of 2012 and the NYSE Bloomberg Global Solar Energy Index up at the time of writing by no less than 66 per cent on the year so far Score 5 10 2 World wakes from shale gas swoon I predicted loftily that 2013 would be the year when the US recovers from its infatuation with shale gas moving into a rather more mature and nuanced relationship and that the UK and other European countries would resume work on exploiting shale gas but this will do nothing to restrain prices in the short or medium term I also said the liquefied natural gas market in Asia would remain tight with prices uncomfortably high I was pretty much on the money Henry Hub prices in the US have spent most of the year above the US3 50 mark and at the time of writing are back up above US4 In the US excitement continues about the job gas can do in saving manufacturing in that country Still it was clear from the Bloomberg New Energy Finance Summit in New York in April that investors and policy makers have moved from thinking about gas gas gas to a more considered version of all of the above with particular emphasis on shrinking coal and the Keystone XL pipeline Small scale solar has been gaining very rapidly in mind share among policy makers both supporters and opponents In Europe the debate has shifted from how shale gas if it is not banned outright will inevitably bring about sharp falls in energy bills to whether local communities want shale gas how quickly resources can practically be exploited and what shale gas extraction might actually cost The major benefit of shale gas in Europe and Asia now looks to be energy security rather than prices at least outside China For the moment Asian gas prices remain forbiddingly high as Japan and China bid for international supplies Score 7 10 3 Financial innovation grows from a trickle to a bigger trickle I predicted that renewable energy projects would attract new sources of capital via novel financing approaches mentioning specifically asset back securitisations and solar real estate investment trusts in the US and the beginnings of a project bond market in Europe Here I would say that I was spot on in terms of the overall theme though not so much as far as the detail is concerned This year has seen heartening innovation in terms of harnessing long term investor capital One notable development has been the emergence of so called yieldcos In the US NRG Yield a unit of a New Jersey based utility raised US431m in an initial public offering from investors attracted by its portfolio of wind solar and gas fired generation assets on long term contracts In Europe four specialist funds holding operating stage renewable energy assets floated on the London market raising a total of 845m The year 2013 has also been a record in Europe for direct investment in projects by institutions and pension funds commitments by the likes of Allianz Munich Re and PensionDanmark reaching US1 3 billion by late October In November SolarCity became the first company in the US to offer bonds backed by rooftop solar systems Its initial US54 4m sale may be followed by up to US200m in additional notes as soon as the second quarter of 2014 according to the company s chief financial officer and this month the European Investment Bank provided a US45 8m guarantee to cover 15 per cent of the value of the new bonds sold to finance the transmission line for the Greater Gabbard offshore wind farm in UK waters thereby enabling the whole issue to be lifted one notch to an A3 rating with Moody s Perhaps the most eye catching development very late in the year has been the explosion of interest in green bonds These have generally been investment grade offerings by multilateral banks who have tapped the market using the full weight of their balance sheet but earmarked the proceeds for clean energy or some other sustainability related purpose By the middle of last month the total volume of green bond issuance worldwide in 2013 had topped US8 billion compared to just over US5 billion in 2012 and ahead of the previous record of US6 6 billion in 2010 There was then on Nov 22 a landmark issue of EUR 1 4 billion by EDF twice oversubscribed Score 9 10 4 Europe focuses on energy market reforms At the start of the year I said that Europe would spend much of the year focusing on energy market reforms rather than either grand new energy schemes or climate commitments And so it was to be Common ground I said would be found between fossil and clean energy generators in the idea of capacity markets to encourage the construction of balancing plant to reduce base to peak electricity price volatility Still I also forecast growing challenges to that approach from those who preferred to let pure market forces do their work I also predicted rather safely that backloading the UK s Electricity Market Reforms and Germany s Energiewende would fill the news during 2013 Capacity markets have indeed moved ahead during the year into the proposal stage in the UK and Belgium into the detailed design stage in France and into a commitment from the new coalition government in Germany Meanwhile Poland has plans to expand its strategic reserve Even at the European level other than a surprisingly weak attempt to push through a 30 per cent renewable target by 2030 most of the action has been around market reform This culminated in the publication in November of a consultation document by the EU on Delivering the internal electricity market and the innocuous sounding making the most of public intervention which is EU speak for suggesting that the exemption of Germany s heavy industry from funding its feed in tariffs is a form of State Aid Score 9 10 5 Technology environment and development I predicted that the most dynamic developments in clean energy will continue to take place outside Europe and that in general developments would be driven by technology broader environment or economic development concerns rather than climate I talked about California emerging as the leading carbon trading programme in the world with the highest prices the US Environmental Protection Agency curtailing the emissions of particulates from the country s coal fired power stations and moves by China to curb pollution in its cities by shutting coal plants and limiting vehicle emissions I also said that 2013 would be the year that hydrocarbon producers in the Middle East start building clean energy at scale Most of this came to pass during the year California does indeed have comfortably the highest carbon prices in the world although at US11 65 per ton at the time of writing it is down from the US14 50 figure of the early summer It certainly trumps the European Union where the emission allowance price for December was 4 90 euros per ton As for the US EPA in September it published draft rules effectively requiring new coal fired power plants to capture and store a portion of the CO2 they produce The agency also received substantial support from President Barack Obama who for the first time in his tenure articulated clearly an administration strategy specifically aimed at combatting climate change The President pledged to have the EPA draft new CO2 emissions rules for existing coal plants by summer 2014 In February China said it would impose emission limits on six polluting industries including coal fired plants and some cities are proposing vehicle emission curbs including Shijiazhuang and Shanghai China has also become the world s largest solar installation market this year Still its hoped for clampdown on coal remains mostly that hoped for In the Middle East the renewables bandwagon is still revving up though it has not really raced forward in 2013 There have been solar financings in Algeria Oman and the United Arab Emirates yet it has been megawatts rather than hundreds or thousands of megawatts Score 8 10 6 China Africa Latin America to drive solar growth The prognosis here was that solar would remain dominant accounting for 50 per cent or more of total investment in clean energy in 2013 with investment rising by a small margin despite the fact that system prices will be lower than those of 2012 I expected China to overtake Germany to be the largest solar market at some 8 gigawatts installed and said that there would be rising PV activity in sub Saharan Africa and Latin America We seem to have been correct on the overall positive tone although whether dollar investment numbers in solar will be a bit up or a bit down on 2012 remains in the balance at the time of writing The latest Quarterly Outlook from our solar team published at the beginning of December says that PV demand in 2013 is likely to finish up in the 35 8 40 4GW range well ahead of last year s 30 6GW and China is on course to be the largest market this year somewhere in the range 8 5 10 2GW ahead of Japan s 7 6 8 7GW The German market is likely to have shrunk in 2013 by more than 50 per cent And we look likely to be right on solar accounting for more than half of total clean energy investment in 2013 We perhaps jumped the gun a little on Africa Up to the third quarter solar investment has lagged a bit behind 2012 although that may change when the Q4 numbers are crunched and some extra deals from earlier in the year are unearthed Latin America already had pushed ahead of full year 2012 levels for solar investment by the end of the third quarter with Chile in particular seeing good growth Score 8 10 7 Installations becalmed but financing picks up for wind The thesis here was that even though wind turbine installation would be about 10 per cent down on 2012 s record financing activity would revive helped by the new lease of life for the US Production Tax Credit This would push overall wind asset finance in 2013 above the 2012 figure since revised slightly to US75 billion Well we are still in with an outside chance on this one In the first three quarters of 2013 wind asset finance was US44 7 billion so it would take a strong fourth quarter and some newly discovered projects from earlier in the year to take us up to the 2012 number Certainly the pace of investment has picked up in the US after a dismal first quarter Still the likelihood is that global wind asset finance will end down on the year not up reflecting shrinkage in the Chinese market and a slow year for offshore wind financings in Europe in the face of policy uncertainties in the UK and Germany Our latest published forecast is for total installations this year to be around 33 7GW down from 46 6GW in 2012 Score 5 10 8 Boring bioenergies make money I suggested that 2013 would see an additional 2 gigawatts of renewable dispatchable capacity in the EU 27 in the form of biomass to power with a doubling of pellet imports Another strand was that the relatively boring ethanol sector in Brazil would have a good year in 2013 boosted by a bumper sugar harvest while ethanol prices in the US stayed high because of a bad corn harvest in late 2012 I have to admit to overcooking this prediction somewhat our biomass analysts latest view is that there has been 940MW of new biomass and waste to energy capacity commissioned in the EU so far this year and that pellet imports have risen 50 per cent rather than 100 per cent We were closer to the mark on biofuels with ethanol prices in the US staying

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/18/smart-energy/clean-energys-small-gains-2013-battlefield (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Michael Liebreich | Business Spectator
    set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Michael Liebreich Clean energy s small gains on the 2013 battlefield The year in review shows that while overall investment in clean energy is likely to have fallen for a second year running the renewables revolutionaries have staked out valuable new ground by Michael Liebreich 8 39am December 18 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators US labour market

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/michael-liebreich (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • EU to probe renewables surcharges | Business Spectator
    internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu EU to probe renewables surcharges 17 Dec 2013 9 28 AM Climate Energy markets Policy Politics Renewable energy Competition concerns prompt look into German renewable energy discounts to industrial users You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters The European Commission is opening an investigation into the discounts German industries get on renewable energy surcharges according to a draft letter sent to Berlin which could lead to higher costs for thousands of firms in Europe s biggest economy Germany collects surcharges from power consumers to help fund operators of wind and solar power plants Heavy electricity users such as cement steel and chemical plants are exempt from the surcharge to keep them from being priced out of the global market A draft letter from competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia to Berlin said the Commission would open a probe into whether Germany s policy distorts competition Some 2300 companies are in the exemption scheme Angela Merkel is on the verge of securing a third term as chancellor should grass roots Social Democrats give a green light to forming a coalition government with her conservatives in a poll One of the new government s top priorities will be

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/17/policy-politics/eu-probe-renewables-surcharges (2014-01-13)
    Open archived version from archive