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  • States protest Gonski decision | Business Spectator
    wake of its report outlining the fall of coal globally The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu States protest Gonski decision 27 Nov 2013 4 18 AM 3 Politics Industries Education States pressure Abbott to overrule education minister s announcement You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Federal Education Minister Christopher Pyne s announcement that the Abbott government will scrap the Gonski education funding scheme from 2015 has prompted some states to urge the prime minister to overrule his education minister according to The Australian States that had struck Gonski schools funding plans with the previous Labor government have urged Tony Abbott to intervene insisting that the Gonski deals were binding New South Wales Liberal Premier Barry O Farrell called Mr Pyne s decision unacceptable However education and legal experts said the Gonski deals were unlikely to be deemed binding The Australian reported Mr Pyne attributed his decision to a finding that the Gonski scheme suffered from a 1 2 billion shortfall Print this page Related articles 13 Jan Abbott eyes repeal of 8000 red tape laws 13 Jan Morgan to join financial inquiry 13 Jan Iran nuke deal to take effect 13 Jan Govt interest bills surging report 13 Jan Palmer wants to repeal Newman laws More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Mouse Shipway Wed 2013 11 27 08 35 Let s see what Pyne has to offer before you all go swinging in the trees If promises have been made but not funded how can they be implemented if the money just isn t there If some schools have had money promised while others have had it slashed where is that fair for all school children The politics of the last few years have become very mercenary and selfish There are a whole country of children that deserve the same

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/27/politics/states-protest-gonski-decision (2014-01-13)
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  • Govt 'weaseling' out of Gonski: Shorten | Business Spectator
    like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP The Abbott government is using weasel words to wriggle out of schools funding agreements it said it would support before the election Opposition Leader Bill Shorten says Federal Education Minister Christopher Pyne says the coalition will have to go back to the drawing board on Labor s so called Gonski reforms because they had left it in a shambles He said deals had not been finalised with the Catholic education sector nor with the Victorian or Tasmanian governments as claimed by Labor at the time But Mr Shorten who was education minister in the Rudd government which negotiated the deals with Tasmania Victoria and the Catholic sector said the only people who don t seem to remember there was a deal in Australia is the current coalition government What we re being told by Tony Abbott and Christopher Pyne is that all of us have collectively imagined that there was a press conference with the state minister for education of Victoria that there was a press conference with the Tasmanian minister that there were statements from the National Catholic Education Commission Mr Shorten told reporters in Melbourne The Labor leader accused the government of using weasel words to walk away from its pledge to honour for four years the Gonski funding agreements Before the election the government said it is not an issue it s a unity ticket no daylight between Liberal and Labor he said Now we see the coalition government saying Well actually we don t mean what we said then and that we re reopening agreements we re reopening deals with state governments we re reopening deals with the Catholic education system in Australia Mr Pyne insists the billions of dollars in promised schools funding is not at risk despite flagging a revamp of Labor s model Only four of the 10 jurisdictions had signed up to Labor s so called Gonski plan he said Tragically I have to go back to the drawing board essentially and try and create a funding model that can be implemented he told Sky News Print this page Related articles 13 Jan Abbott eyes repeal of 8000 red tape laws 13 Jan Govt interest bills surging report 13 Jan Palmer wants to repeal Newman laws 12 Jan Vic energy minister to step down 12 Jan Trade pact is close Robb More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Graham Middleton Mon 2013 11 25 15 55 Usual Labor trick of taking credit for introducing a scheme that could not be fitted into the present budget or the forward estimates with true long term cost buried in the future then expecting

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/25/national-affairs/govt-weaseling-out-gonski-shorten (2014-01-13)
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  • The failure of Udacity | Business Spectator
    been bigger Massive Open Online Courses MOOCs would make courses from Harvard and MIT available free to anyone with an internet connection The world s poor would finally have access to the same education as American ivy league students while traditional fee paying higher education would go the way of relics like CDs and sailing ships Massive open online education provider Udacity was one of those promising such change In the past Udacity s founder Sebastian Thrun claimed MOOCs would spell the end of the conventional higher education model and transform access to knowledge Despite the big promises retention rates in Udacity courses have been abysmal and those that did make it through were already those with bachelor degrees Now Udacity has decided to charge money for their certified courses leaving behind their claims of free quality higher education for all As leading technology enhanced learning expert George Siemens described it Thrun promised us a bright future of open learning He delivered to us something along the lines of a 1990s corporate e learning program Even Thrun himself has now admitted that Udacity is a lousy product So where did it all go wrong for Thrun and Udacity And why when it comes to online education did we ignore education experts and listen to Silicon Valley instead A cheaper faster education Ultimately the outcome of higher learning cannot be made cheaper and faster any more than you can expect to improve physical fitness if you cut corners at the gym While there are myriad products and services claiming a fast cheap route to fitness nothing is as effective as time and or intensity pumping iron or going on the treadmill Similarly if students don t put in the right kind of work with the right guidance and expend sufficient cognitive effort they will not see results The fundamental understanding of quality online learning in higher education was mostly lost or ignored in the MOOC hype Unlike the invention of online music stores or the steam powered ship the journey is just as important as the destination when it comes to learning The ultimate aim of higher as opposed to vocational education is to transform student thinking and ways of being Getting there faster and cheaper short changes everyone If we cannot give graduates the solid critical and creative thinking skills they need they will be ill equipped to deal with the immensely complex economic social and environmental problems we face in the coming decades Where was the research An extensive history of research in education and the learning sciences tells us about the best ways of learning and teaching Yet the voices of the thousands of eminent scholars in these fields have been largely drowned out Instead economists and innovation gurus like Harvard s Clayton Christensen and technology advocates like Thrun have dominated the online education headlines Despite the enthusiasm of MOOC advocates the quality of the learning experience in many but by no means all MOOCs is dubious Watching

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/21/technology/failure-udacity (2014-01-13)
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  • Jason Lodge | Business Spectator
    of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Goldman s coal shoulder The investment bank giant has sold its stake in what would be the largest coal terminal on the US west coast in the wake of its report outlining the fall of coal globally The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Jason Lodge The failure of Udacity The Massive open online education provider Udacity has decided to charge for certified courses So are those pioneering the digital education trend paying more attention to Silicon Valley than education experts by Jason Lodge 8 59am November 21 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Goldman s coal shoulder Ari Phillips 1 min ago The

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/jason-lodge (2014-01-13)
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  • Vocation to raise $253m in IPO | Business Spectator
    Energy Latest stories Goldman s coal shoulder The investment bank giant has sold its stake in what would be the largest coal terminal on the US west coast in the wake of its report outlining the fall of coal globally The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Vocation to raise 253m in IPO Brett Cole 18 Nov 2013 2 29 PM DataRoom Equity Capital Markets Industries Education The proceeds of the company s IPO will be used to pay its original shareholders You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Vocation Ltd the vocational education and training company plans to raise as much as 253 3 million in an initial public offering whose proceeds will be used to pay its founding shareholders The company will sell 200 million shares at 1 89 each in an IPO priced at 15 4 times Vocation s forecast 2014 earnings per share according to its prospectus All the shares sold in the IPO are currently held Vocation s founders directors management and employees The company was formed out of three private providers of vocation training and education and offers 78 qualifications Total vocational education and training sector revenue in Australia in 2012 was 8 8 billion Vocation does not cater to the foreign student market Up to 80 per cent of Vocation s revenue is derived from government contracts and it currently has 16 state and territory government contracts In the 12 months to June 30 2013 Vocation had about 24 000 new course enrolments We expect the government to continue to support vocational training Vocation Chief Executive Mark Hutchinson told DataRoom Vocation forecasts a net profit of 6 3 million on revenue of 105 1 million in the 12 months to June 30 2014 Macquarie Group Ltd and UBS AG are the joint lead managers of the IPO The two investment banks will be paid 8 8 million for their management of the IPO and may earn another 2 5 million in fees at the discretion of

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/18/dataroom/vocation-raise-253m-ipo-0 (2014-01-13)
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  • Govt to consider HECS sale: Pyne | Business Spectator
    Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Goldman s coal shoulder The investment bank giant has sold its stake in what would be the largest coal terminal on the US west coast in the wake of its report outlining the fall of coal globally The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Govt to consider HECS sale Pyne 29 Oct 2013 1 53 AM Politics Industries Education Minister says coalition to review merits of move to find savings You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP Education Minister Christopher Pyne says the coalition government will investigate whether it is sensible to on sell 23 billion of HECS debt to the private sector There has been speculation the Abbott government will look at privatising the rising debt to generate savings for the budget While a spokesman for Treasurer Joe Hockey previously said the proposal was not current coalition policy Mr Pyne told ABC s Q A on Monday that the selling off of the HECS debt had been floated as an idea It wouldn t be insensible for us to do so Why would you rule anything like that out Mr Pyne said He cited Britain as an example of a country that had sold their HECS debt as an asset We are going to investigate whether it is a sensible move to do so he said We were elected to make a change We weren t elected to simply keep the ring that Labor had created for six years in their government Meanwhile Mr Pyne said he would like to begin online national testing for literacy and numeracy from 2014 so results would be made available to teachers within two to three months The current National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy NAPLAN tests are done on paper If you get the results in October or November it is far too late for the teacher to do anything about using it as a diagnostic tool he said The principal

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/10/29/politics/govt-consider-hecs-sale-pyne (2014-01-13)
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  • Forrest to make giant $65m donation | Business Spectator
    means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Goldman s coal shoulder The investment bank giant has sold its stake in what would be the largest coal terminal on the US west coast in the wake of its report outlining the fall of coal globally The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Forrest to make giant 65m donation 15 Oct 2013 5 58 AM Industries Education Resources and Energy Mining magnate prepares to make record donation to five WA universities You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter Mining magnate Andrew Forrest will tonight announce a 65 million cash gift to fund research at five universities in one of the biggest philanthropic donations in Australia s history the Australian reports The newspaper says the Fortescue Metals Group chairman will make the announcement tonight at a gala dinner at his alma mater the University of Western Australia The donation is said to include a new 50m Forrest Foundation which will fund scholarships and postdoctoral fellowships at UWA and WA s four other universities in an attempt to attract the brightest young minds to the state and establish Perth as a knowledge hub Mr Forrest graduated from UWA in 1983 with a degree in economics Print this page Related articles 17 Dec List of IPO debut flops grows 16 Dec Govt mulls uni control report 09 Dec Vocation Affinity shares rise on debut 05 Dec Lessons lost in the Gonski debate 04

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/10/15/education/forrest-make-giant-65m-donation (2014-01-13)
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  • Broadband to usher in new era of smart-home applications: ACBI | Business Spectator
    Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Goldman s coal shoulder The investment bank giant has sold its stake in what would be the largest coal terminal on the US west coast in the wake of its report outlining the fall of coal globally The nuclear renaissance is stone cold dead There is no nuclear recovery with the industry last year flailing to stay above water in key markets and its share of global electricity continuing a seemingly inexorable decline Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Broadband to usher in new era of smart home applications ACBI Harrison Polites 3 Sep 2013 11 31 AM Technology NBN Buzz Telecommunication Industries Education Australian Centre for Broadband Innovation outlines a raft of home based tools that will be enabled by broadband technology You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Broadband technology is set to enable a new age of intuitive smart home applications according to a new report from the CSIRO s Australian Centre for Broadband Innovation The group s report describes a raft of tools that will all be enabled by better broadband connectivity Some examples include system that remote monitors air quality or another that helps those suffering particular chronic diseases undertake breathing exercises We are on the dawn of a new App Age where next generation broadband networks will allow us to better manage our home energy use support the elderly living independently at home as well as providing us with more personalised entertainment content by connecting people in their homes with services enabled by sensors and cloud computing director of ACBI Colin Griffith said in a statement With predictions that by 2020 the average person will own six smart devices connecting us to over 37 billion things from cows in the field to our car to our washing machine it s clear that a better broadband infrastructure will revolutionise the way we access services in the home he said The report follows a competition from ACBI which asked entrepreneurs to develop application ideas and uses for broadband infrastructure The firm awarded a total prize pool of 65 000 to five ideas across the three categories of media smart appliances and

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/9/3/technology/broadband-usher-new-era-smart-home-applications-acbi (2014-01-13)
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