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  • A fifth year of declining power consumption
    from Victoria s Macarthur wind farm 2 NEM electricity consumption Electricity consumption as measured by scheduled demand has continued the decline that started back in 2009 refer to Figure 1 and fell by 5448 GWh for the 12 months ending 31 December 2013 All states other than Tasmania experienced a reduction in electricity consumption with South Australia and NSW experiencing the largest reductions with 3 7 per cent and 3 6 per cent respectively Figure 2 NSW experienced the largest absolute reduction 2 579 GWh a significant portion of which was attributable to the closure of the Kurri Kurri aluminium smelter towards the end of 2012 Approximately 0 3 per cent of the reduction 536 GWh can be explained by 2012 being a leap year and having an extra day For a like with like comparison we have adjusted for the impact of the leap year by adjusting 2012 consumption downwards by 536 GWh This was equal to one day of the 2012 average daily demand Electricity consumption for an adjusted 2012 was 195 5 TWh this fell by 4 9 TWh in 2013 2 5 per cent Refer to Table 1 for electricity consumption figures by state including the impact of the leap year adjustment Figure 1 Scheduled demand on a 6 monthly basis from 2009 to December 2013 Figure 2 Change in scheduled electricity consumption 2013 cf 2012 no allowance for leap year impact Table 1 Scheduled electricity demand by state GWh 2013 cf 2012 More than 850 MW a year of roof top solar PV was installed in NEM states over the 2012 and 2013 period and is estimated to have generated an additional 1 182 GWh for 2013 This would account for 22 per cent of the reduction in overall consumption The contribution of solar hot water and an array of energy efficiency activities supported by the NSW and Victorian Energy Savings Schemes have also contributed to lower electricity consumption These activities supported through government legislated market based schemes is estimated to account for a further 1042 GWh of the overall reduction in consumption In total identifiable distributed energy activities could reasonably account for more than 2 200 GWh of demand reduction equivalent to 41 per cent refer to Figure 3 Figure 3 Reduction in electricity demand 2013 cf 2012 3 Power generation in the NEM Coal fired generation as a proportion of total NEM wide generation has fallen from 78 per cent in 2012 to 76 2 per cent in 2013 refer to Table 3 Gas fired generation has also reduced its market share falling from 12 5 per cent of NEM generation in 2012 to 11 8 per cent in 2013 Scheduled renewables have increased their market share from 9 5 per cent in 2012 to 11 9 per cent in 2013 Coal generation fell 5 0 per cent from 2012 levels and gas generation fell by 7 7 per cent bearing the brunt of the reduction in electricity consumption refer to Figure 4

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/print/765666 (2014-01-13)
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  • Making a Million Solar Roofs work | Business Spectator
    market for Australia s declining solar industry Solar industry in decline The solar industry is currently hurting The industry has grown rapidly in recent years with the support of the Renewable Energy Target and feed in tariffs The removal of many of these incentives has meant industry activity has declined significantly over the past 12 months Solar systems creating certificates for the eight months to end of August have reduced by 31 per cent for solar PV and 22 per cent for solar hot water compared to the same period in 2012 The industry is expected to contract further over the next 12 months leading to further job losses and more business closures The decline for solar PV in particular is illustrated in the following graph Figure 1 Solar PV systems creating STCs since June 2012 wysiwyg field wf deltas 0 wf field field wysiwyg media wf formatter aibm ui media output wf settings style full width wf cache 1380581963 wf entity id 620481 wf entity type node Solar PV system installations in all states and territories have declined significantly over the last 12 months The solar industry is also affected by the uncertainty surrounding another review of the RET in 2014 having just recovered from the bruising of the last RET review finalised just nine months ago The level of deeming is to be progressively phased out from 2016 onwards which will reduce the support provided by the RET to solar over time The Abbott government should at the earliest opportunity reaffirm its support for the Small scale Renewable Energy Scheme and let the industry get on with business The truth is the Million Solar Roofs program cannot work without being complemented by the SRES so it is in the government s and industry s best interests to reaffirm support for the SRES Scheme implementation and improving industry standards Under the SRES we have a strong regulatory system in place to ensure good practice This currently works through the requirements that systems creating certificates have approved products and are installed by an accredited installer In addition compliance is further reinforced through the solar inspections process the work and publications of the Clean Energy Regulator and the fit and proper person provisions All systems that are supported by the Million Solar Roofs program should be eligible to create Small scale Technology Certificates and be subject to their compliance requirements Further grant payments should only be made once the system installations have been approved by the Clean Energy Regulator for STCs Rebate programs do have a history of creating boom and bust cycles for industry the dreaded solar coaster but this can be avoided by placing a cap on annual funding and regularly publishing the level of grants being processed and approved Limits could also be placed on the number of grants to be collected by any individual solar re seller to ensure no one company controls the market and grants could be limited to one per site There are good

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/30/solar-energy/making-million-solar-roofs-work (2014-01-13)
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  • Hunt's rebate can stop solar's slide | Business Spectator
    end August this was a 22 per cent reduction on the 54 000 for the same period in 2012 and 54 000 in 2011 The environment minister has also indicated previously that he is committed to promoting quality and best practice through the solar industry There is an opportunity to work with the Government in developing this program to ensure that this is achieved through program design The solar industry is expected to contract further over the next 12 months leading to further job losses and business closures The RAA supports the million solar roofs policy which will help increase demand particularly in solar hot water and will help low income earners reduce their power bills by installing solar Together with other solar industry organisations we will be working constructively with the new government to ensure that the new policy delivers maximum benefit to the industry and supports the development of new markets which make solar more accessible to low income families Ric Brazzale is managing director of Green Energy Trading and president of the REC Agents Association Print this page More from Ric Brazzale 10 Jan A fifth year of declining power consumption 30 Sep Making a Million Solar Roofs work 03 Jul Solar and wind surge while demand slumps 27 Jun Why are energy efficiency certificate prices falling 25 Jun Biggest Australian renewable energy generators in 2012 Related articles 13 Jan Qld seeks comment on massive farm project 13 Jan Hunt holds firm on RET 10 Jan Obama orders review of energy infrastructure 10 Jan Senators look to revive US climate debate 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Hilton Fletcher Fri 2013 09 20 13 37 Is it a good thing to encourage smaller PV systems Surely lessons from the 8000 rebate 1kW PV for max rebate and the STCs multiplier max rebate at 1 5kW haven t been forgotten Having been in the industry through both schemes I think that Finn Peacock is likely to be correct in predicting that cheap small systems will proliferate with a flat 500 bonus The price per watt ratio deters buyers from purchasing a larger system It was hard to sell more than 1kW in the days of the 8000 rebate and equally hard to sell larger than 1 5kW in the STCs multiplier days as the numbers simply didn t stack up We now have lots of PV owners who realise that their 1kW or 1 5kW PV system is making minimal difference to their power bills There appears to be a lot of self interest in Ric s article It seems to be written from the perspective of lets get more STCs traded which is understandable given his position and business From a consumer s perspective what will happen to

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/20/policy-politics/hunts-rebate-can-stop-solars-slide (2014-01-13)
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  • Solar and wind surge while demand slumps | Business Spectator
    per cent and was offset to some degree by increases in scheduled wind and gas generation Table 3 Electricity generation by state and fuel six months to 30 June wysiwyg field wf deltas 14 wf field field wysiwyg media wf formatter aibm ui media output wf settings style full width wf cache 1372814454 wf entity id 518041 wf entity type node Ric Brazzale is Managing Director of Green Energy Markets Print this page Solar and wind surge while demand slumps Ric Brazzale 3 Jul 2013 11 04 AM 14 Climate Energy markets Renewable energy Solar energy Wind power More from Ric Brazzale 10 Jan A fifth year of declining power consumption 30 Sep Making a Million Solar Roofs work 20 Sep Hunt s rebate can stop solar s slide 27 Jun Why are energy efficiency certificate prices falling 25 Jun Biggest Australian renewable energy generators in 2012 Related articles 10 Jan RWE to shut 7 power plants 10 Jan A fifth year of declining power consumption 10 Jan Negative spin Europe s amazing electricity prices 10 Jan Alcoa gives up on aid report 09 Jan Coal stuck in price squeeze More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Log in to post comments Comments This article states the Submitted by Andrew Simpson on Wed 2013 07 03 11 28 This article states the obvious Wherever there are subsidies which pick winners and provide a comparitive advanatage over other technologies you will inevitably find growth from rent seekers Log in to post comments Andrew if you think that Submitted by Wil B on Wed 2013 07 03 12 04 Andrew if you think that solar and wind are heavily subsidised relatively to coal you re not thinking hard enough More generally Point Henry Aluminium smelter is probably on its last legs This is approx 18 25 percent of Victoria s coal fired power consumption including Portland a very big hit to Hazelwood if this occurs Log in to post comments I can t speak for all aspects Submitted by Andrew Simpson on Wed 2013 07 03 12 39 I can t speak for all aspects of coal in Australia however from my experience the coal generators in South Australia receive next to nothing in terms of subsidies or incentives from the gov And I cant find much in terms of literature which contradicts this Compare this to wind in South Australia which receives half a million per year in selling LGC s alone This is blatant profiteering from rent seekers as your and my tax payer expense Log in to post comments Even if what you say about Submitted by Ian Franklin on Wed 2013 07 03 13 27 Even if what you say about subsidies to the coal industry in SA were true you ignore the direct health benefits to Port Augusta residents and the downward pressure on the wholesale costs of power from wind cancelling most of the small impost from LGCs Your comments suggest that you ignore the threats to future generations from AGW I on the other hand am proud of SA s efforts to support renewable energy Log in to post comments The direct health costs are Submitted by Andrew Simpson on Wed 2013 07 03 14 02 The direct health costs are often exagerrated by alarmists such as doctors for the environment etc In fact having been involved somewhat in this issue I can state two things One smoking rates are far higher in port Augusta than the rest of Australia Something which is overlooked And breast Cancer rates in Poret Augusta are some of the lowest in Australia There is no cause or correlation here Also while your correct than wholesale markets prices are being pushed lower by wind you ignore one important fact The capital costs of building wind in the first place And this capex expenditure is recouped by retailers in customers bills Also there is a huge debate over how much wind is hidden within the network component of customers bills The economic vandalism taking place within the NEM wont and cant last for much longer To many distortions And people are finally clocking on to the rort Log in to post comments Andrew Submitted by Craig Memery on Wed 2013 07 03 14 35 Andrew The capital costs of building new wind farms are funded by an investor and along with the running costs are recouped over time through the competitive wholesale energy market and the competitive RET market Wind energy also receives RECs LGCs again on a competitive market because it is clean Similarly the capital costs of building new fossil fuel generators are funded by the investor and along with the running costs are recouped over time through the competitive wholesale energy market Fossil fuels don t get RECs because they are not clean RECs level the playing field between sustainable and non sustainable generation The competitive wholesale market and the competitive REC market not the capital cost of wind farms determines how much consumers pay for energy Given the above highlighting the capital cost of wind energy makes no sense If it were too expensive it wouldn t be built Log in to post comments Craig Memery Looks like Submitted by Keyser Söze on Thu 2013 07 04 00 14 Craig Memery Looks like young Andrew is copping a bit of flak here so I will interject Without subsidy renewables are not economic The MRET Scheme requires gradually escalating proportions of power to be generated via renewables up to 20 by 2020 In fact due to demand reductions in comparison to forecast demand at the time of MRET introduction the proportion will be more like 23 because the target was set in GWh rather than as a of actual demand As part of this scheme REC s are required to be acquired or acquitted The penalties for not doing do are very

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/3/energy-markets/solar-and-wind-surge-while-demand-slumps (2014-01-13)
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  • Why are energy efficiency certificate prices falling? | Business Spectator
    must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Over the last few weeks we have seen a significant reduction in the wholesale price for both Victorian Energy Efficiency Certificates VEECs and NSW Energy Savings Certificates ESCs The spot VEEC price fell 21 per cent from 17 50 on May 17 to 13 90 on June 21 The ESC price has fallen even further falling 23 per cent from 23 00 on May 17 to 17 60 on June 21 Since Friday the ESC price has continued to fall reaching 15 25 at last trade on June 25 In this blog we explain why prices have fallen and consider the factors that might impact on future prices Turning to VEECs first the market has been significantly oversupplied with the rollout of free standby power controllers SPCs SPCs have dominated VEEC creation accounting for 75 per cent of all VEECs created since the beginning of 2012 This has resulted in a massive oversupply of certificates such that by mid May 2013 sufficient VEECs had been submitted for registration to meet the target for 2013 The VEEC price remained reasonably stable until the end of April as there was an expectation that the level of SPC installations would start to fall However a fall in SPC installations did not occur and we have consistently been creating in excess of the weekly target refer to Figure 1 Figure 1 VEEC creation and price since Jan 1 2012 While the level of weekly VEEC creation has started to fall over the last few weeks it will need to fall significantly below the average weekly target to curb the downward price trend As demand i e the target is fixed the price will need to fall to a level that supports a sufficient level of certificate creation to meet the target It is difficult to determine whether we have reached that price level due to lags in the certificate creation process At current VEEC price levels it will be less viable to provide SPCs for free so we may well see continue to see a decline in certificate creation The ESC market has showed many of the same characteristics as VEECs In the case of the NSW Energy Savings Scheme commercial lighting has been the dominant activity accounting for more than 80 per cent of ESC creation The 2013 target of 2 5 million ESCs converts into an average of 48 000 ESCs created per week So far this year an average of 67 000 ESCs has been created per week which is 40 per cent above the required target refer to Figure 2 Figure 2 ESC

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/6/27/energy-markets/why-are-energy-efficiency-certificate-prices-falling (2014-01-13)
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  • Biggest Australian renewable energy generators in 2012 | Business Spectator
    until December 31 to produce LGCs for 2012 generation and we expect that considerably more LGCs will still be created for Poatina for 2012 The Collgar Wind farm 206 MW in Western Australia started operating in mid 2011 and produced the second most LGCs in 2012 with 686 235 The Macarthur wind farm in western Victoria 420 MW became fully operational in January 2013 and by capacity is Australia s largest wind farm We expect that for 2013 it will be the wind farm that produces the most LGCs The power stations producing the most LGCs in each of the other renewable fuel categories are summarised in Table 2 below Of particular note is that waste coal mine gas generators were included in the Renewables scheme for generation from July 1 last year wer Station State Fuel LGCs in 2011 LGCs in 2012 Table 2 Largest LGC creators for other renewable fuel categories wysiwyg field wf deltas 2 wf field field wysiwyg media wf formatter aibm ui media output wf settings style full width wf cache 1372129784 wf entity id 513321 wf entity type node In total 11 3 million LGCs were created for electricity generated in 2012 as at 14 May 2013 We estimate that there are still two million LGCs yet to be created for 2012 generation largely from baseline hydro generators refer to Table 3 We estimate that a total of 13 2 million LGCs will eventually be created by power stations for 2012 generation a 31 per cent increase on 2011 levels Wind is the largest creator of LGCs accounting for 60 per cent with hydro the next biggest at 20 per cent Table 3 LGC creation by power stations by fuel source for 2012 generation year wysiwyg field wf deltas 3 wf field field wysiwyg media wf formatter aibm ui media output wf settings style full width wf cache 1372129784 wf entity id 513321 wf entity type node The analysis above is an extract from Green Energy Market s Renewable Power Station Report May 2013 that is available on a subscription basis Ric Brazzale is Managing Director of Green Energy Markets Print this page Biggest Australian renewable energy generators in 2012 Ric Brazzale 25 Jun 2013 8 25 AM Climate Energy markets Renewable energy More from Ric Brazzale 10 Jan A fifth year of declining power consumption 30 Sep Making a Million Solar Roofs work 20 Sep Hunt s rebate can stop solar s slide 03 Jul Solar and wind surge while demand slumps 27 Jun Why are energy efficiency certificate prices falling Related articles 10 Jan RWE to shut 7 power plants 10 Jan A fifth year of declining power consumption 10 Jan Negative spin Europe s amazing electricity prices 10 Jan Alcoa gives up on aid report 09 Jan Coal stuck in price squeeze More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Log in to post comments Search

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/6/25/energy-markets/biggest-australian-renewable-energy-generators-2012 (2014-01-13)
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  • A fifth year of declining power consumption | Business Spectator
    and non scheduled generation have been fairly stable over the last three years it provides a solid basis for analysing year on year changes to electricity consumption Electricity consumption fell in all states with the exception of Tasmania 2 5 per cent growth In relative terms the most significant drop in consumption was observed in South Australia 3 7 per cent which was closely followed by New South Wales 3 6 per cent Queensland and Victoria decreased by 2 4 and 2 8 per cent respectively As 2012 was a leap year with 366 days 536 gigawatt hours GWh of the reduction 0 3 per cent can be explained by 2013 having one less day than 2012 Once we allow for the impact of the leap year underlying electricity consumption in the NEM reduced by 2 5 per cent There are a range of reasons that can explain the reduction including decline in level of manufacturing milder weather installation of residential solar and improved energy efficiency amongst others An average of approximately 850 MW per annum of solar PV has been installed in NEM states over the last two years which accounts for 22 per cent of the reduction in consumption Solar hot water systems and energy efficient activities supported by market based measures accounted for another 19 per cent of the lower consumption Scheduled renewable generation increased by 22 per cent in 2013 and accounted for 11 9 per cent market share 9 5 per cent in 2012 This increase was at the expense of gas and coal fired generation The largest relative decrease was observed in gas where generation fell 7 7 per cent or 1 9 TWh Generation from coal fired plant accounted for the largest drop in generation in absolute terms 7 7 TWh dropping by 5 per cent from 2012 levels Generation from coal fell in all states except New South Wales Queensland experienced the largest reduction in coal fired generation falling by 10 6 per cent largely due to the closure of a number of coal fired units Scheduled renewables excludes smaller non scheduled small wind bioenergy and solar experienced significant growth in 2013 Due to a wet 2013 hydro was able to generate at record levels with generation growing 17 7 per cent or 2 7 TWh largely as a result of hydro plant in Tasmania Generation from wind grew 43 1 per cent or 1 4 TWh 957 GWh of which came from Victoria s Macarthur wind farm 2 NEM electricity consumption Electricity consumption as measured by scheduled demand has continued the decline that started back in 2009 refer to Figure 1 and fell by 5448 GWh for the 12 months ending 31 December 2013 All states other than Tasmania experienced a reduction in electricity consumption with South Australia and NSW experiencing the largest reductions with 3 7 per cent and 3 6 per cent respectively Figure 2 NSW experienced the largest absolute reduction 2 579 GWh a significant portion of which was attributable to the closure of the Kurri Kurri aluminium smelter towards the end of 2012 Approximately 0 3 per cent of the reduction 536 GWh can be explained by 2012 being a leap year and having an extra day For a like with like comparison we have adjusted for the impact of the leap year by adjusting 2012 consumption downwards by 536 GWh This was equal to one day of the 2012 average daily demand Electricity consumption for an adjusted 2012 was 195 5 TWh this fell by 4 9 TWh in 2013 2 5 per cent Refer to Table 1 for electricity consumption figures by state including the impact of the leap year adjustment Figure 1 Scheduled demand on a 6 monthly basis from 2009 to December 2013 Figure 2 Change in scheduled electricity consumption 2013 cf 2012 no allowance for leap year impact Table 1 Scheduled electricity demand by state GWh 2013 cf 2012 More than 850 MW a year of roof top solar PV was installed in NEM states over the 2012 and 2013 period and is estimated to have generated an additional 1 182 GWh for 2013 This would account for 22 per cent of the reduction in overall consumption The contribution of solar hot water and an array of energy efficiency activities supported by the NSW and Victorian Energy Savings Schemes have also contributed to lower electricity consumption These activities supported through government legislated market based schemes is estimated to account for a further 1042 GWh of the overall reduction in consumption In total identifiable distributed energy activities could reasonably account for more than 2 200 GWh of demand reduction equivalent to 41 per cent refer to Figure 3 Figure 3 Reduction in electricity demand 2013 cf 2012 3 Power generation in the NEM Coal fired generation as a proportion of total NEM wide generation has fallen from 78 per cent in 2012 to 76 2 per cent in 2013 refer to Table 3 Gas fired generation has also reduced its market share falling from 12 5 per cent of NEM generation in 2012 to 11 8 per cent in 2013 Scheduled renewables have increased their market share from 9 5 per cent in 2012 to 11 9 per cent in 2013 Coal generation fell 5 0 per cent from 2012 levels and gas generation fell by 7 7 per cent bearing the brunt of the reduction in electricity consumption refer to Figure 4 and Table 2 Scheduled wind generation increased by 43 per cent in 2013 largely due to a full year s output from the 420 MW Macarthur wind farm in Victoria and the commissioning of the Mt Mercer Wind Farm Victoria and the Musselroe Wind Farm Tasmania in 2013 Hydro generation also increased significantly during the year 17 7 per cent due to continuing wet conditions and the drawdown from storages particularly in Tasmania Figure 4 NEM scheduled generation by fuel 2013 cf 2012 Table 2 Change in scheduled electricity generation

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/10/energy-markets/fifth-year-declining-power-consumption?destination=node/765666 (2014-01-13)
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  • Qld mulls massive farm project | Business Spectator
    Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Qld mulls massive farm project 12 Jan 10 57 PM 1 Industries Agribusiness State govt calls for comment on proposed 325 000 hectare project You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP Queensland s government has called for public comment on a proposed agriculture project that would be bigger than Luxembourg and Liechtenstein combined The planned Etheridge Integrated Agricultural Project in north Queensland will include about 325 000 hectares of grazing land crops water storage and infrastructure Deputy Premier Jeff Seeney says it would produce sugar and guar for Asian markets and longer term plans could potentially include a sugar mill a meat processing plant aquaculture and renewable energy facilities Mr Seeney has called for the public to comment on the draft terms of reference for the environmental impact statement I encourage interested parties to comment during this process which will examine the potential environmental economic and social impacts and opportunities of a proposed agricultural hub west of Georgetown Mr Seeney said in a statement on Saturday The environmental impact statement process should not be construed as the green light for the project to proceed it is just the first step in what will be a lengthy and rigorous assessment of the proposed project Members of the public can comment on the environmental impact statement s draft terms of reference until February 10 The state coordinator general will then thoroughly review the terms of reference and release the final version for the proponent to address in its environmental impact statement Print this page Related articles 10 Jan Saputo increases WCB stake again 10 Jan Saputo pushes for Bega s Warrnambool stake 10 Jan Hedge funds key to WCB fight 10 Jan Saputo tipped to extend Warrnambool offer 09 Jan WCB merger claims disputed More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Ian Macallan Mon 2014 01 13 02 34 Conditionally support this project on the following grounds 1 Any Guar bean harvesting is neither processed nor sold to a processor for the purposes of producing gum for any form of hydrocarbon fracking Must be solely applied for the purpose of foodstock for the beef livestock trade in Australia and possibly New Zealand where a surplus exists 2 The investment required is sourced

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2014/1/12/agribusiness/qld-mulls-massive-farm-project (2014-01-13)
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