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  • The little Aussie EV that could? | Business Spectator
    registered version in 2010 and successfully drove it 16 000 miles down the Pan American Highway Lasting 140 days in total and including 70 days of actual driving they completed the Alaska to Argentina expedition and demonstrated that this package can really work and electro motive packages have come a long long way since 2010 The AMRacing motor for example is one of the highest powered and most advanced electric motors around and the ELMOFO team are confident they can deliver enormous power from this electro motive powerhouse So far they are delivering around 416kW 565bhp of power and 600Nm of torque For comparison the standard non electric SR8 is rated at around 316kW 430bhp through it s a 2 7L V8 engine That my friends is mightily impressive and just why this car might be about to make some history The ELMOFO team have recently conducted a number of track tests and the results have been excellent especially given that they are just getting started and have yet to fully dial in both the electric drive train and the race car package A number of conventional Radical drivers have tested the ELMOFO package with overwhelming positive responses And in something of a coup for the team they have signed up Australian motor racing legend John Bowe as the official ambassador and it now looks likely that Bowe will get behind the wheel for the entire 2014 season Bowe described the ELMOFO as very smooth very torquey much like a 7 0L V8 It is perhaps this statement from Bowe which highlights the real potential of the electro motive package in the ELMOFO car Brutally powerful and incredibly simple it consists of a battery pack a controller a brain and a motor connected together with some fat copper That is substantially different from an internal combustion engine that has literally thousands of moving parts a gearbox and clutch system and in highly strung race engines they require constant tuning and maintenance Being from a solar background ELMOFO have a portable solar powered fast charger to go with their car and will use 2014 to demonstrate the race potential reliability and low running costs of these cars Based on the results of other electric vehicles in competition around the world I m betting we might just see some history made next year based on good old Australian ingenuity and a willingness to have a go Nigel Morris is director of Solar Business Services wysiwyg field contenteditable false wf deltas 0 wf field field wysiwyg media wf formatter aibm ui media output wf settings style full width wf cache 1386568936 wf entity id 710961 wf entity type node I bet you d like a ride in it wouldn t you Well the good news is ELMOFO is a two seater and is offering a number of sponsorship opportunities some of which include hot laps If you re interested in being part of history and having a little fun you can email us

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/9/policy-politics/little-aussie-ev-could (2014-01-13)
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  • Branson signs up for Formula E | Business Spectator
    must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Branson signs up for Formula E 8 Dec 2013 9 59 AM Climate Smart Energy Virgin gets on board EV race series You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters Richard Branson s Virgin Group will enter a team in the new Formula E electric racing series starting next year the British entrepreneur said on Friday Formula E races will be staged in city centres around the world and its backers hope it will increase the market for battery powered vehicles and advance the technology behind them Virgin was involved in Formula One racing for two seasons from 2010 Its Formula E team will be run by Alex Tai who had a brief spell as head of the F1 team The launch of the Formula E Championship is exciting news for racing fans but also for those that believe in developing the great electric cars of the future said Branson one of Britain s best known businessmen thanks to his long involvement in industries ranging from music to airlines and rail The need to create fast dependable and durable race cars will help to accelerate the sector and showcase electric cars to a large global audience he added The addition of Virgin means that

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/8/smart-energy/branson-signs-formula-e (2014-01-13)
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  • Smart Energy | Business Spectator
    stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Smart Energy Abbott and Hunt s bureaucratic blindspot A growing undercurrent of industry and business figures are questioning whether Direct Action s abatement revenue will be worth the government hassle by Tristan Edis 11 47am December 06 11 comments Meridian plots a retail powerplay Unlike other energy retailers with strategies geared to creating temporary agitation Meridian s Powershop aims to permanently upset Australia s big three by Tristan Edis 10 05am December 04 5 comments Mahindra Racing joins Formula E Indian manufacturer signs for race series an excellent global showcase for our EV technology 1 34pm December 02 Australian CleanTech Index performance Nov Clean energy firms have outperformed the broader market again avoiding the benchmark s retreat as 11 companies posted gains of 20 per cent or more by John O Brien 12 42pm December 02 Dyesol takes innovation award Solar cell firm tops 100 finalists for coolest gong 11 19am November 29 High speed rail back on agenda Truss talks up rail as Albanese vows promises private memeber s bill 10 09am November 29 1 comment Zip zapping around the bends A lot s been happening in the the world of electric motorcycles Let s hope their fun factor can provide surprise boost to global EV momentum by Nigel Morris 1 54pm November 27 4 comments EU agrees on car emissions limits Compromise deal to delay full implementation by one year to 2021 9 53am November 27 Electric vs hydrogen A Chinese battleground European auto giants are heralding the all electric car for China s great market but elsewhere Toyota and Honda are betting on a hydrogen fuel cell future by Samuel Shen Norihiko Shirouzu 10 44am November 26 4 comments Apple s 100 renewable solar headquarters IT company Apple received council approval to build its new carbon neutral headquarters involving fuel cells on site geothermal power and topped off with a 70 000 square metre roof gleaming with solar panels by Adam Peck 11 26am November 22 Musk Still on track The Telsa founder says his electric car mission has not been derailed responding to recent

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/climate/smart-energy?page=1 (2014-01-13)
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  • Smart Energy | Business Spectator
    2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Smart Energy Labor urges transport rethink Oppn says PM has made strategic error by eschewing funding for public transport 1 34pm January 08 20 comments Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 Energy efficiency schemes in NSW and Victoria are hitting targets and saving households and businesses but both are up for review NSW seems keen to expand their scheme but Victoria s Minister appears cold by Tristan Edis 12 08pm January 08 6 comments Australia failing the light bulb test Swathe of unregistered lamps undermining lighting energy efficiency standards 10 45am January 08 The demand drop mystery explained For well over a century electricity demand has grown each and every year then in 2010 something changed Credit goes well beyond just manufacturing closures and bill shock with energy efficiency critical by Hugh Saddler 11 19am January 06 6 comments Biomass plant snubbed for fast track scheme UK coal conversion project misses clean energy list 10 41am December 20 Electric Asia is Saab s last gasp Fading Swedish icon to gamble on a Chinese EV revival 10 30am December 20 Underground rail plan serious WA Libs Airport link would be 2bn project opposition warns of engineering headache 7 11am December 20 1 comment Clean energy s small gains on the 2013 battlefield The year in review shows that while overall investment in clean energy is likely to have fallen for a second year running the renewables revolutionaries have staked out valuable new ground by Michael Liebreich 8 39am December 18 AGL is wrong on demand response Yesterday AGL s Simon Camroux claimed it was too complicated to allow customers to bid in reductions in demand in competition with power generators bidding astronomical prices But it isn t by Craig Memery 11 50am December 13 3 comments Lamenting a frigid climate and energy mix The inability to source a top end energy efficient fridge highlight s Australia s climate policy and energy market mess by Alan Pears 11 31am December 13 2 comments Tapping China s green transformation On many fronts China is surprisingly well advanced in its historic transition to a carbon lite economy Australia s clean energy experts need to get with the program by

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/climate/smart-energy?destination=taxonomy/term/3363 (2014-01-13)
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  • 3 reasons the solar PV party is over | Business Spectator
    to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The Australian solar PV party is over The remarkable run of rapid growth solar PV has enjoyed since Costello spiked the punch bowl with the 8000 rebate back in 2007 is at an end Last year s close to a gigawatt of installations will be the high water mark that will not be exceeded for several years 2013 will herald a tough year of adjustment and consolidation The fact that solar PV market has continued to plough on unabated in spite of repeated cuts to government support has led some to conclude that solar PV is some kind of unstoppable juggernaut set to wipe away everything before it But there were a series of three tailwinds that enabled this to happen and these have now run out of puff 1 Declining solar module prices have now reached diminishing returns When the 8000 rebate was launched in 2007 module prices delivered to Australia were in the realm of 5 to 6 per watt Australia was at the bottom of the queue for provision of module product and it was actually difficult to get reliable supply at the quantity desired Since then there have been incredible reductions in module prices which meant that even with the steady cuts government support out of pocket prices for customers barely changed and in fact have steadily declined Since 2007 the module cost per kilowatt kW has dropped from 5000 to about 550 This 4450 saving was critical to solar s ongoing sales in spite of a reduction in government support per kW of about 8000 However even if module prices dropped by a further 20 this will mean a saving of just 110 per kW Such a drop in prices seems incredibly unlikely given PV manufacturers are losing huge amounts of money at current prices But even if it happened it s just not big enough to significantly increase customer uptake It certainly can t offset the loss of electricity revenue for customers from cutting the feed in tariff from 44 cents to 16 in Queensland nor the cut to about 8 cents in other jurisdictions 2 The spike in electricity prices will abruptly end Since 2007 Australia experienced an exceptional spike in electricity prices due to a range of poor regulatory decisions made by government These included changes that encouraged gold plating of network capacity installation of smart meters in Victoria that were charged for upfront and regulators hiking up household regulated retail prices based on the assumption that wholesale generation costs would spike upwards when in fact they declined Source Grattan Institute based on Australian Bureau of Statistics data When

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/2/15/cleantech/3-reasons-solar-pv-party-over (2014-01-13)
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  • Terry McCrann - please check your facts | Business Spectator
    of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Terry McCrann please check your facts Tristan Edis 28 Feb 2013 11 59 AM Climate CleanTech Prominent business commentator Terry McCrann has used the low power output from the Macarthur Wind Farm over the last three months of 2012 to suggest wind power is useless But he missed something rather important You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password In a column in the Herald Sun yesterday headlined What a lot of hot air from AGL Terry McCrann opened with The near total uselessness of so called wind farms was nicely if unintentionally exposed by the detail in the AGL interim profit numbers yesterday As background these interim profit and power output numbers were reporting the half year period from July to December 2012 He then took aim specifically at AGL s new 420MW wind project at Macarthur stating The new Macarthur farm albeit only operating for three months contributed a miserable 128 GWh Miserable Well the thing is that Macarthur was still under construction during that 3 month period he mentions and is still right now going through commissioning tests Below is a chart from Vestas which shows the number of Macarthur turbines connected and exporting generation to the grid over the last three months of 2012 It illustrates that it wasn t until December 12 that all 140 turbines were up and running although still undergoing commissioning Number of Macarthur Wind Farm turbines

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/2/28/cleantech/terry-mccrann-please-check-your-facts (2014-01-13)
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  • Marking the milestones of 2013
    systems in spite of government withdrawal of support Also as reported yesterday 2 Australia has just reached 2 million installed solar systems photovoltaics plus solar and heat pump water heaters Last year was the moment of harsh truth for the solar PV sector as it was when feed in tariffs that gave any premium over the wholesale electricity price were completely wound up In addition the solar PV sector would have to make do with a government rebate of just one small scale renewable energy certificate or STC per megawatt hour of power generation down from two the prior year three the year before and five the year before that The Queensland premium feed in tariff kept things going strong in the first part of the year but that came to a close midway through the year Sure enough sales have dropped substantially since then but the industry managed to surpass the government target of about 850 megawatts While installed capacity was down by about 15 per cent on 2012 it was slightly better than 2011 For an industry built around an assumption of double digit sales growth a 15 per cent decline was tough But to add such an amount of capacity in one year is a big deal for anyone in the Australian electricity market let alone the solar sector The last time we saw that kind of coal capacity installed was back in 2007 with the 750 MW Kogan Creek power plant In February of 2013 I predicted 3 the solar PV party was over but 850 MW for the year far exceeded my grave expectations It is a huge amount better than anyone would have imagined a few years ago given the precipitous drop off in the level of government support Helping cushion the blow of declining feed in tariffs were robust prices for STCs These got very close to the 40 price cap and have tended to remain above 38 over the year Macarthur marks a big milestone in wind as SA hits 30 per cent renewables Australia s biggest wind farm and also large in global terms AGL s 420 MW Macarthur farm was fully commissioned in April Its scale provides a visual testament to the fact that wind power has arrived as a serious source of power in this country More important than its visual scale is that it also produced plenty of electrons pumping out nearly 1000 gigawatt hours of power last year or equivalent to the power consumption of 190 000 households an awful lot more than what tabloid columnist Terry McCrann suggested 4 In addition to Macarthur Musselroe in Tasmania finally became reality after being on then off and then on again over the years And Mount Mercer in Victoria was also commissioned Thanks largely to just these three projects wind generated electricity was up 43 per cent on the prior year Also worthy of mention is that a number of wind farms were under construction over 2013 It wasn

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/print/765696 (2014-01-13)
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  • Marking the milestones of 2013 | Business Spectator
    has declined and 2013 was the year it really sank in that electricity demand wasn t just undergoing a temporary downward blip rather there was a structural improvement in how efficiently Australians use energy Of course there were also some major industrial plant closures but as Hugh Saddler s analysis shows The demand drop mystery explained January 6 most of the change in electricity demand is down to improvements in energy efficiency particularly in the residential sector Solar powers on to 2 million systems in spite of government withdrawal of support Also as reported yesterday Australia has just reached 2 million installed solar systems photovoltaics plus solar and heat pump water heaters Last year was the moment of harsh truth for the solar PV sector as it was when feed in tariffs that gave any premium over the wholesale electricity price were completely wound up In addition the solar PV sector would have to make do with a government rebate of just one small scale renewable energy certificate or STC per megawatt hour of power generation down from two the prior year three the year before and five the year before that The Queensland premium feed in tariff kept things going strong in the first part of the year but that came to a close midway through the year Sure enough sales have dropped substantially since then but the industry managed to surpass the government target of about 850 megawatts While installed capacity was down by about 15 per cent on 2012 it was slightly better than 2011 For an industry built around an assumption of double digit sales growth a 15 per cent decline was tough But to add such an amount of capacity in one year is a big deal for anyone in the Australian electricity market let alone the solar sector The last time we saw that kind of coal capacity installed was back in 2007 with the 750 MW Kogan Creek power plant In February of 2013 I predicted the solar PV party was over but 850 MW for the year far exceeded my grave expectations It is a huge amount better than anyone would have imagined a few years ago given the precipitous drop off in the level of government support Helping cushion the blow of declining feed in tariffs were robust prices for STCs These got very close to the 40 price cap and have tended to remain above 38 over the year Macarthur marks a big milestone in wind as SA hits 30 per cent renewables Australia s biggest wind farm and also large in global terms AGL s 420 MW Macarthur farm was fully commissioned in April Its scale provides a visual testament to the fact that wind power has arrived as a serious source of power in this country More important than its visual scale is that it also produced plenty of electrons pumping out nearly 1000 gigawatt hours of power last year or equivalent to the power consumption of 190 000 households an awful lot more than what tabloid columnist Terry McCrann suggested In addition to Macarthur Musselroe in Tasmania finally became reality after being on then off and then on again over the years And Mount Mercer in Victoria was also commissioned Thanks largely to just these three projects wind generated electricity was up 43 per cent on the prior year Also worthy of mention is that a number of wind farms were under construction over 2013 It wasn t nearly as many as required but they will provide a living example to the community of the positive changes and employment being generated by the RET One outstanding example of what these projects are delivering can be seen in the short documentary Climate Spectator produced below on Snowtown II wind farm the first in Australia to use Siemens state of the art direct drive turbines With this documentary we ve tried to bring alive the story behind these projects the people involved the sheer scale of the construction task the technology the benefits to the local community and of course lots of those hard hats and reflective vests that our prime minister is so fond of With Snowtown II already generating electricity but not yet fully complete South Australia now gets over 30 per cent of its power from a combination of wind and solar when little more than 10 years ago it represented less than 1 per cent Wrecking ball python squeeze or perhaps just mild inflation and moderate unemployment Lastly we passed the one year anniversary of the introduction of the carbon price and miraculously the sky had not fallen in the economy continued to function price rises were extremely moderate and unemployment remained relatively steady All completely contrary to what we d been told by scare mongering politicians and industry association lobbyists such as the likes of the Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry the Minerals Council and the Business Council of Australia This year is shaping up as a challenging one for clean energy and businesses focused on making a profit by enhancing our future rather than degrading it But at least one can point at tangible examples of things done in 2013 to illustrate that Australia can meet its energy needs while reducing the burden on future generations Print this page More from Tristan Edis 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down 06 Jan Direct Action doomed to fail Related articles 13 Jan Qld seeks comment on massive farm project 13 Jan Hunt holds firm on RET 10 Jan Obama orders review of energy infrastructure 10 Jan Senators look to revive US climate debate 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/10/policy-politics/marking-milestones-2013?destination=node/765696 (2014-01-13)
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