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  • Electric Asia is Saab's last gasp | Business Spectator
    s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Electric Asia is Saab s last gasp 20 Dec 2013 10 30 AM Climate Smart Energy Fading Swedish icon to gamble on a Chinese EV revival You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters A year out of bankruptcy and with just two cars a day rolling off its production line Saab is betting on an as yet unbuilt electric version of a decade old car to bring the iconic Swedish marque back from the dead Saab s new owner National Electric Vehicle Sweden NEVS is targeting its home market of China where the government is promoting clean automotive technology with up to 100 billion yuan 16 billion in vehicle subsidies R D and infrastructure spending according to research firm Frost Sullivan However the battery version of Saab s 9 3 model will be up against the likes of BMW VW and Ford in one of the most competitive industries in the world Even die hard fans are skeptical For NEVS President Matthias Bergman only bold action will resurrect a more than 60 year old brand which pioneered such auto innovations as side impact protection heated seats and headlight washers but which was hurt by high labor costs and lost its quirky image under General Motors ownership We are nearing a tipping point he told Reuters predicting the market for electric vehicles EVs will turn up sharply around 2015 The big volumes will be in China Saab also has a few aces up its sleeve such as its state of the art plant in Trollhattan south Sweden courtesy of GM s 4 billion of investment It will also have cheap batteries supplied by NEVS sister company Beijing National Battery Technology as well as political connections Analysts think sales of EV fleets to local governments

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/20/smart-energy/electric-asia-saabs-last-gasp (2014-01-13)
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  • Underground rail plan 'serious': WA Libs | Business Spectator
    CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Underground rail plan serious WA Libs 20 Dec 2013 7 11 AM 1 Climate Policy Politics Smart Energy Airport link would be 2bn project opposition warns of engineering headache You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP A plan to build an 8km underground rail line beneath Perth s Swan River and airport is being seriously considered by the West Australian government The revelation came a day after the state government announced it was deferring the MAX light rail project a key plank of the Liberal s election platform earlier this year because of rising state debt On Thursday Treasurer Troy Buswell said another near 2 billion plan a proposed rail link to the city s airport was not only going ahead but could become an underground project That is despite the state government s desperate bid to rein in rampant spending and after earlier this year criticising the opposition s rival airport rail plan saying the high water table in the area would create a major engineering headache If it is a value proposition to tunnel the whole way I think we d be mad not to do that Mr Buswell told reporters If it is more expensive than other options of course we re not going to do it because at the end of the day we can t deliver gold plated infrastructure we have to deliver value for money However there is a suggestion and we re considering it seriously that given we have to do half of the 8km length as a tunnel it may well be a value proposition to leave that machine under the ground and keep going to the east

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/20/smart-energy/underground-rail-plan-serious-wa-libs (2014-01-13)
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  • AGL is wrong on demand response | Business Spectator
    point out the perceived complexities either of the reform in question or the energy market that it fits into Camroux offers us an amalgamation of two diagrams contained in the final AEMC Power of Choice Report shown again here as evidence that the DRM is bad because it s complex Firstly if complexity was a valid reason to not do important things in the National Energy Market we wouldn t actually have a National Energy Market Having poked around the NEM for a while now I m yet to discover the simple thing in the energy market that we are meant to use as a benchmark to measure too complex Secondly in spite of the artist s valiant creative efforts to illustrate the complexity of the interrelatedness of everything with this collage what these diagrams are telling us is not even that complicated Let me summarise the diagrams in bullet points First how does the DRM work in a practical sense The spot price in the NEM goes up on a peak day so A large energy user switches something off so Demand is reduced so Less generation is required Hardly rocket science Even the financial arrangements though new aren t that complicated by energy market standards The large energy user gets paid the wholesale price that money would otherwise have gone to the generator so other consumers are not out of pocket The large energy user pays the retailer based on what they would have consumed anyway so the retailers aren t out of pocket either and the large energy user is prevented from gaming and The distributor is paid for the use of the network just like normal so the distribution business is not out of pocket Importantly under this model if the participating consumer gets it wrong and dispatches when prices are low they alone will lose out and other consumers still benefit through reduced wholesale costs Playing the gaming game Camroux claims that DR participants have a strong incentive to inflate the baseline energy consumption to be paid for demand based events Putting aside the astounding irony that AGL would be concerned about gaming in the energy market see this story for an example let s consider what would be required for a DR participant to do what has been suggested Baseline consumption is used as a reference for the energy that a participating consumer would have used had they not curtailed their load His concern about gaming demonstrates a lack of understanding of not only the proposed DRM but of how consumers use energy The baseline approach proposed by AEMO is similar to that used effectively in other energy markets around the world with some appropriate customisation for the Australian context Consumption is calculated on the basis of energy consumed on site over a matter of weeks Given the intermittent nature of high price events and difficulty projecting them more than hours in advance to inflate one s long term baseline energy consumption would require

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/13/energy-markets/agl-wrong-demand-response (2014-01-13)
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  • Lamenting a frigid climate and energy mix | Business Spectator
    variable speed compressor cut my peak demand by around 100 watts Using the Productivity Commission s recent estimates this saves my electricity suppliers around 30 each year in infrastructure investment It s saving me around 75 Since I had to buy a new fridge anyway and I paid no more than I would have for a less efficient one I m avoiding CO2 emissions at a cost of minus 300 tonne My old fridge went off to the Phoenix Fridge recycling program where its refrigerant CFCs can be recovered and its components recycled DDDBut I have reduced my utilisation of the existing electricity supply assets depriving their owners of revenue Should I be charged more for this See below AEMC contempt for 2 million voters The Australian Energy Markets Commission has released a new report In the introduction the report states Effective consumer participation can contribute to more efficient markets AEMC should check its economics text books Informed empowered consumers are fundamental to the efficient operation of markets Yet after 15 years it s still not happening The report argues that owners of rooftop PV should be charged more for reducing utilisation of energy supply assets Can it point to any other market where this happens Do gas suppliers compensate the electricity industry when people install a gas heater to replace an electric one Those who install and use large air conditioners and halogen lights have benefited from large subsidies for many years yet no action has been taken to make them pay The AEMC is taking on over two million PV owning voters on behalf of the incumbent businesses When will our political leaders in COAG and the Standing Committee on Energy and Resources step in to sort them out Will a thin pipe approach help electricity networks to survive The latest idea to help electricity network owners adjust to our rapidly changing technologies is to use low capacity wires combined with distributed energy storage generation and smart controls instead of building capacity to supply peak demand This is similar to the green grid approach that was proposed by solar identity Dale Butler at the 1993 Australian Solar Conference for fringe of grid electricity It sounded really sensible to me when I originally heard it It still does especially given cost reductions and technology improvements A typical all electric home might use 10 000kWh a year if it could smooth its demand perfectly over time it would only need supply capacity of 1 2 kilowatts most homes have supply cables with capacity of 10 to 20 kilowatts My latest calculations suggest a three person best practice all electric home with all mod cons could now use around 2000 2500kWh per year That s a smoothed demand of under 300 watts But is this the salvation of network owners The answer depends on many variables If a cluster of consumers can share back up generation and storage they may not need the grid at all This back up generation could

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/13/smart-energy/lamenting-frigid-climate-and-energy-mix (2014-01-13)
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  • Alan Pears | Business Spectator
    20am November 06 Bringing the power sector account After five hearings of the electricity price inquiry a clear picture is emerging on power prices and it is clear there are many people to blame The process has been off the rails for 15 years and it s time it was fixed by Alan Pears 7 59am October 19 Energy a public policy disaster Thanks to 15 years of the wrong objective energy policymakers have repeatedly failed to effectively address energy market failures and this is ensuring consumers are paying more than they should be by Alan Pears 11 07am September 25 Ducking from an energy war As energy generation evolves utilities will need to evolve as well or face extinction And the emerging reality is only further clouded by a lack of understanding amongst policymakers by Alan Pears 9 58am September 17 The carbon tax jelly snake Understanding of how carbon pricing works provides the knowledge that it will be more like a lolly snake than a python squeeze by Alan Pears 1 17pm July 25 Slows on Australia s energy game changer Energy efficiency is the big game changer in climate response policy so why has it taken Australia so long to move by Alan Pears 10 00am July 09 The carbon tax needn t cost you Around half of the carbon cost for households should come through higher electricity bills but here s how to dodge it and keep more of the government s compensation payments to yourself by Alan Pears 4 34pm June 28 Gillard s carbon pricing flaw A basic policy failure in the clean energy future scheme is offering a convenient way for the states to back away from climate action It s time the Gillard Government fixed it by Alan Pears 7 25am March 28 The Alan Pears column There is reason to believe the recent decline in energy consumption is not a one off blip while the draft Energy White Paper needs significant improvement by Alan Pears 11 41am March 22 The great gas debate Many people see gas playing a significant role in the transition to a more sustainable energy future but a paper by leading climate scientist Tom Wigley raises some concerns by Alan Pears 10 41am February 24 Powering down has Australian electricity consumption hit its peak Recent reports are noting an unprecedented drop in Australia s electricity consumption So what s behind the decline And is it a blip or a trend by Alan Pears 10 29am August 31 Lamenting a frigid climate and energy mix The inability to source a top end energy efficient fridge highlight s Australia s climate policy and energy market mess by Alan Pears 11 31am December 13 2 comments Reduced demand what s the problem There are abundant energy efficiency measures Australia could be pursuing which reduce both peak demand and overall use Provided they benefit consumers and society it shouldn t matter that they undermine electricity businesses asset base by Alan Pears

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/alan-pears (2014-01-13)
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  • Ben Redmond | Business Spectator
    of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Ben Redmond Tapping China s green transformation On many fronts China is surprisingly well advanced in its historic transition to a carbon lite economy Australia s clean energy experts need to get with the program by Ben Redmond 9 08am December 13 17 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators US labour market can

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/ben-redmond (2014-01-13)
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  • Leo likes Formula E | Business Spectator
    v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Leo likes Formula E 11 Dec 2013 9 53 AM Climate Smart Energy DiCaprio founds EV team for world race series You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters Hollywood actor Leonardo DiCaprio will be involved in the new Formula E electric racing series as a co founder of the Monaco based Venturi team that has secured the 10th and final entry The 10 city championship is due to start up next year with the first race in Beijing in September The future of our planet depends on our ability to embrace fuel efficient clean energy vehicles the 39 year old Great Gatsby and Titanic actor known for his environmental activism said in a statement yesterday Venturi Grand Prix has shown tremendous foresight in their decision to create an environmentally friendly racing team and I am happy to be a part of this effort Formula E races sanctioned by the International Automobile Federation will be staged in city centers around the world and backers hope the series will increase the market for battery powered vehicles and advance the technology behind

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/11/smart-energy/leo-likes-formula-e (2014-01-13)
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  • Tony Wood | Business Spectator
    off a reduced carbon future Government barriers to the adoption of new low emissions technologies are hurting Australia s chances of reducing emissions at the lowest cost But there is an alternative available to both sides of politics by Tony Wood 8 20am July 16 2 comments The CEFC balancing act Despite a good dose of sound economic rationale in the expert review the jury is out as to whether the Clean Energy Finance Corporation can be introduced effectively by Tony Wood 7 37am April 23 Gaps in the great gas puzzle Australia is blesssed with an array of energy options but just where does gas fit into the mix by Tony Wood 8 08pm March 19 CLIMATE SPECTATOR Surrender to the charge Given the sound policy rationale behind a floor price for the coming Australian ETS a surrender charge is essential for the integrity of the scheme by Tony Wood 11 28am March 07 Surrender to the charge Given the sound policy rationale behind a floor price for the coming Australian ETS a surrender charge is essential for the integrity of the scheme by Tony Wood 8 09am March 07 CLIMATE SPECTATOR A bright shine in small solar fixes Domestic solar PV is only one part of the complex energy solution we need but its real value comes when it can reduce the capital investment in the power grid needed to meet peak demand by Tony Wood 11 00am February 14 A bright shine in small solar fixes Domestic solar PV is only one part of the complex energy solution we need but its real value comes when it can reduce the capital investment in the power grid needed to meet peak demand by Tony Wood 10 33am February 14 A carbon priced world is not enough Australia has a multitude of options for near zero emission electricity but current ETS policy won t lead to business investment at a sufficient scale by Tony Wood 7 14am February 06 A carbon priced world is not enough Australia has a multitude of options for near zero emission electricity but current ETS policy won t lead to business investment at a sufficient scale by Tony Wood 6 29am February 06 7 comments International carbon markets what are the implications for Australia As Australia prepares for an ETS in 2015 a patchwork of international carbon markets is emerging So what can we learn from these schemes And is linking to them the a good idea by Tony Wood 11 21am October 20 Australia stares down an electricity death spiral Falling electricity consumption means higher prices for consumers as costs are spread among a lower customer base Policymakers must deal with the consequences of falling demand before it s too late by Tony Wood 7 14am December 11 27 comments California calling Australia isn t alone on carbon action Californian chief regulator Mary Nichols has indicated a Californian and Australian ETS link is a way off but climate action around the world suggests

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/tony-wood (2014-01-13)
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