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  • Australia’s hottest year, mostly warm eleswhere | Business Spectator
    month in Australia s climate history Many parts of the central and eastern interior were as warm in September as they would be in an average November Every month of 2013 had national average temperatures at least 0 5 degrees above normal Only in the second half of June did a spell of below average national temperatures last for more than a week The only below average monthly temperatures recorded for any state or territory occurred in Tasmania in April Victoria and Tasmania in November and the Northern Territory in December Annual average temperatures were above normal over the entire continent but the heat was particularly significant over the central continent stretching from western Queensland across outback South Australia and the southern Northern Territory into the Nullarbor in Western Australia Over this region temperatures in 2013 were 1 5 to 2 degrees above average and many records were set across a range of periods Temperatures were closest to normal along the east coast including Tasmania and adjacent ranges as well as the northern tropics but even in those locations temperatures were generally 0 5 to 1 degree warmer than average Most of the previous notably hot years in Australia have come when there has been El Niño or near El Niño conditions in the tropical Pacific Following the breakdown of La Niña in the first half of 2012 and a period of relatively cooler temperatures traditionally associated with this climatic state conditions have remained close to neutral all year with neither an El Niño nor La Niña state in the tropical Pacific The presence of record temperatures without the climatic influence of an El Niño makes the 2013 Australian temperatures especially significant Rainfall was near average except here and there It was a mixed bag for Australian rainfall in 2013 On a nationally averaged basis it was close to normal 8 per cent below average but there were some big variations The contrast was especially striking in Queensland and northern NSW It was a wet year on most of the east coast This was thanks in part to ex Tropical Cyclone Oswald which tracked down the coast in January and caused heavy rain and widespread flooding from northern Queensland all the way south to Sydney Oswald s rains had little effect west of the Great Dividing Range and areas more than 300km inland in Queensland suffered from drought for most of the year Mount Isa had its driest year on record with only 86 millimetres It was a wet year over many northern and interior parts of Western Australia The effects of tropical cyclones early in the year were followed by regular northwest cloud band activity between May and mid July when waters northwest of the continent were unusually warm as part of a negative phase of the Indian Ocean Dipole Heavy rains at the end of the year associated with Tropical Cyclone Christine were enough to take Port Hedland beyond its previous wettest year Over much of southern coastal Australia rainfall was fairly close to normal From July to October unusually strong and persistent westerly winds over southern Australia brought heavy rain to the southern coastal fringe especially Tasmania but very dry conditions to NSW and Queensland 2013 the global picture Globally it was another warm year As of the end of November global temperatures were 0 49 degrees above average ranking 2013 as the sixth hottest year on record Thirteen of the 14 hottest years on record have occurred since 2001 Other parts of the world to experience their warmest year on record in 2013 included the tropical North Pacific region around and east of the Philippines along with parts of central Asia The exceptionally warm waters in the western North Pacific contributed to a very active tropical cyclone season in the region especially in October and November In those months there were seven super typhoons the equivalent of a category 4 or 5 tropical cyclone in Australia in as many weeks The most significant of these was Typhoon Haiyan one of the most intense tropical cyclones ever to make landfall It caused massive destruction and claimed thousands of lives in the Philippines in early November Overall after three fairly quiet years global tropical cyclone activity was slightly above normal in 2013 In contrast to the record hot conditions in Australia 2013 temperatures were near normal in the United States In 2012 it was the other way around with the United States having a record warm year It was also less warm than some recent years at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere Arctic sea ice melted to a lesser extent than in 2012 although the total sea ice extent was still lower than in any year before 2007 At the other end of the globe the extent of Antarctic sea ice reached record high levels in September Compared to the Arctic Antarctic sea ice extent is not as strongly influenced by recent global warming with year to year climate variability still playing a large role in year to year changes in Antarctic sea ice extent In northern and central Europe a hot summer followed a cold spring It was also an exceptionally hot summer in parts of eastern Asia especially eastern China the Korean Peninsula and Japan Large fluctuations between extreme heat and cold were a feature of South America in late winter and spring as one example snow fell around the Argentinian city of Cordoba in mid September only days after it had reached 40 degrees At the end of the year an exceptionally prolonged heatwave set many records in northern and central Argentina including for the capital Buenos Aires Extreme rainfall was not as much of a feature of 2013 globally as it has been in some recent years though monsoon season rainfall was generally above normal both in the Indian subcontinent and the Sahel region of west and central Africa In addition to western Queensland regions to experience significant drought in 2013 included parts

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/6/science-environment/australias-hottest-year-mostly-warm-eleswhere (2014-01-13)
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  • Blair Trewin & David Jones & Karl Braganza & Neil Plummer & Rob Smalley | Business Spectator
    numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Blair Trewin David Jones Karl Braganza Neil Plummer Rob Smalley Australia s hottest year mostly warm eleswhere Australia produced its warmest year yet despite no El Niño while elsewhere a worldwide record was set for November amid an above average year by Blair Trewin David Jones Karl Braganza Neil Plummer Rob Smalley 10 59am January 06 7 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/blair-trewin-david-jones-karl-braganza-neil-plummer-rob-smalley (2014-01-13)
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  • Ian Lowe | Business Spectator
    Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Ian Lowe ANZ Bank is blowing the carbon budget ANZ s board are exposing shareholders and depositors to a very risky business by lending money to coal projects Approvals by Australian state governments won t save them from global concern to act on climate change by Ian Lowe 11 22am December 20 12 comments Premier Newman s coal ition government The Newman Queensland Government appears intent to sacrifice environmental concerns in an effort to expand mining and coal mining in particular by Ian Lowe 12 39pm September 14 A Fukushima end to the nuclear argument A year on from Fukushima and the debate around nuclear energy continues but with plenty of low emission alternatives perhaps it s time we put it to bed for good by Ian Lowe 10 09am March 13 Back to school for climate sceptics Noted climate change sceptic Ian Plimer s latest book targets school children who the geologist says are being taught activism not science But he is underestimating science education and school children by Ian Lowe 7 43am December 20 2050 The state of the environment With the fourth national report on the state of the Australian environment now in preparation the business as usual scenario is bleak But there is a more positive outlook by Ian Lowe 7 59am August 24 Time to gazump the fuel guzzlers Australia is lagging behind world standards in setting fuel efficiency targets for new cars Meeting long term goals will require lighter models and better designs by Ian Lowe 8 47am June 02 ANZ Bank is blowing the carbon budget ANZ s board are exposing shareholders and depositors to a very risky business by lending money to coal projects Approvals by Australian state governments won t save them from global concern to act on climate change by Ian Lowe 11 22am December 20 12 comments Premier Newman s coal ition government The Newman Queensland Government appears intent to sacrifice environmental concerns in an effort to expand mining and coal mining in particular by

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/ian-lowe (2014-01-13)
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  • China's polar expansion to include climate focus | Business Spectator
    launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu China s polar expansion to include climate focus 20 Dec 2013 10 45 AM Climate Science Environment Nation to expand scientific presence in Antarctica with new research bases You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters China will expand its presence in Antarctica by building a fourth research base and finding a site for a fifth a state run newspaper said on Thursday as the country steps up its increasingly far flung scientific efforts Chinese scientists are increasingly looking beyond China for their research including sending submersibles to explore the bottom of the ocean and last weekend landing the country s first probe on the moon Workers will build a summer field camp called Taishan and look for a site for another research station the official China Daily reported As a latecomer to Antarctic scientific research China is catching up the report cited Qu Tanzhou director of the State Oceanic Administration s Chinese Arctic and Antarctic Administration as saying China already has three Antarctic research stations Great Wall Zhongshan and Kunlun Building the Taishan camp and inspecting sites for the other station can further guarantee that Chinese scientists will conduct scientific research over a wider range and in a safer way Qu said The Taishan camp will be used during the South Pole s summer from December to March and will provide logistical support and be used to study geology glaciers geomagnetism and atmospheric science the newspaper said Scientists will also be focusing their studies

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/20/science-environment/chinas-polar-expansion-include-climate-focus (2014-01-13)
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  • A green army missing the point | Business Spectator
    any other my emphasis and in many cases would require training and skills Jump to 2013 Richard Eckersley wrote a report for the Australia21 organisation Repairing and preparing Australia s landscapes for global change Why we must do much more It was a report on an expert roundtable held at the University of Melbourne on February 21 2013 to consider the question What are the benefits of large scale reforestation and revegetation and how can they best be achieved This report makes some really interesting observations and recommendations There was considerable discussion and agreement on the need for a landscape regeneration industry that would produce the necessary capacity to implement policy increase professionalism and provide technical services education and extension Success in this whole exercise would be if the revegetation industry achieves the same status in Australia as the mining industry You can count this as a number of things but it s a cultural shift in that revegetation and sustainable land management are seen as part of our identity what we do both for rural people and city people It also needs to be seen as an economic activity based on sustained long term investment through public private partnerships In the same way that realising economic benefits from mining depends on public investment in infrastructure training and skills and private capital in resource extraction large scale revegetation and land repair will require public investment in green infrastructure and private investment in a range of benefits If it s the case that government is going to step up with large amounts of money for large scale work then there is a bunch of structural problems in the system Indeed the revegetation industry doesn t really exist It s a bunch of sheltered workshops and cottage industries around the place We really need to develop a whole level of professionalism if you take the mining industry analogy we need the revegetation services business to be there with all that technical expertise just like we would expect from other sectors rather than it being seen as a job for volunteers A landscape industry could provide jobs almost anywhere in Australia so making an important contribution to social and economic stability in the event of global economic troubles This job creation would support rural communities and help the unemployed in urban areas The 1989 CSIRO report noted regreening Australia could be an important component of guaranteeing people an adequate income in return for doing socially useful work The report stimulated programs such as the current Green Corps which give young people work experience and skills The current Green Corps is barely recognisable from the original Green Corps which commenced in 1997 and was itself one in a long line of similar schemes over 20 odd years In any event it is about to be superceded by the Coalition s proposed new Green Army From its own website The Coalition will create a standing Green Army that will gradually build to a 15 000

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/20/policy-politics/green-army-missing-point (2014-01-13)
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  • David Hudson | Business Spectator
    of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu David Hudson A green army missing the point Australia has long grappled with the challenge of creating a conservation industry to restore the landscape The Coalition s latest incarnation is unlikely to be effective by David Hudson 9 56am December 20 2 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators US labour market can withstand

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/david-hudson (2014-01-13)
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  • Beyond the ice: A nation's slow motion loss | Business Spectator
    crucial to the nation today Glacial rivers generate hydropower that provides most of the country s electricity Glacier ice stores water for its 320 000 residents Some of the country s glaciers have vanished already and several others will be gone within a decade or two said Bjornsson one of the leading scientists to quantify the link between glacial loss and greenhouse gas induced warming A generation from now there may not be enough water to drive turbines or slake a nation s thirst Dust storms will swirl over dry glacier beds while huge expanses of exposed earth erode Without glaciers one resident quipped Iceland is just land Happening now Effects are already beginning to appear Bjornsson tells of Iceland s longest bridge a half mile span over the Skeidara River which drains from the massive Vatnajokull ice cap down to the island s south coast A few years ago the river disappeared and now this bridge the longest bridge in Iceland is just standing there and there s no water underneath it he said So it looks like we are crazy here in Iceland On this Kentucky sized island one is never far from the ice look up from just about anywhere and you ll see towering white peaks and hanging glacier filled valleys and Icelanders are feeling its loss in a variety of ways Magnus Hallgrimsson has spent a lifetime on the ice The wiry octogenarian is vice president of the Iceland Glaciological Society a group of volunteers who have conducted annual surveys of the island s glaciers since 1950 and has been assisting Iceland Search and Rescue since 1948 An avid sportsman he s made numerous glacial ascents and crossed the island s massive interior ice field many times as the photos lining his Reykjavik apartment attest A path of just gravel In the past few years Hallgrimsson said some of the glaciers he frequents have begun to disappear He s measured retreats of as much as one third of a mile The tail of the glacier goes back and leaves just gravel And the melt which he first noticed in the mid 1980s is accelerating In the last years in the lower areas of the Tindfjallajokull a glacier in the southern highlands he said all the snow is gone Iceland s ice caps the largest in Europe outside of Greenland have waned 6 per cent since 1995 with lower glaciers like Solheimajokull an outlet of the Myrdalsjokull ice cap shrinking much faster Because Iceland s warming began more than a decade later than in Europe and North America that decline signals a very rapid change And with the melt rate speeding up as climate change effects intensify and feed off each other Iceland could lose 30 per cent of its glacial mass by 2050 according to Bjornsson If temperatures rise 2 degrees Celsius by the end of the next century the maximum acceptable increase set by nations at the United Nations climate talks Bjornsson calculates that Iceland s glaciers will be no more than small ice museums atop the highest peaks as early as the mid 2100s Nailed and tied it down Artist Vigdis Bjarnadottir read an article in her morning paper last year about a new study by Bjornsson and colleagues predicting that the glacier she had grown up near scenic Snaefellsjokull on the island s western peninsula could be gone within 20 years I was very shocked said Bjarnadottir who spent her childhood in the village of Olafsvik at the foot of the rising glacier This is my favourite mountain We can see it from Reykjavik on a good day always so beautiful said the retired presidential secretary who now lives in Gardabaer just south of the capital The news inspired her to create a painting of the mountain with tacks and strings crossing its glacial peaks As we do not want the Snaefellsjokull Glacier to disappear she declared emphatically I have nailed and tied it down The painting exhibited in a western Iceland art exhibit last summer also shows a half man half giant named Bardur Snaefellsas According to Icelandic lore Bardur was one of the region s earliest settlers and descended into the glacier more than a century ago to become a guardian of the land But the giant seems to be off duty these days the glacier already looks much smaller to Bjarnadottir You are able to see new landscape new black lava cliffs she said where there was ice some years ago Travel photos more than a century old provide stark illustration for Bjornsson The pictures of southwestern glacier Kotarjokull were taken by English explorer Frederick W W Howell as he made the first ascent of Hvannadalshnukur Iceland s highest peak in 1891 Two years ago researchers visited the same spots and took new photographs Comparing the old and new photos Bjornsson and colleagues determined that Kotarjokull had lost 20 per cent of its volume since Howell s visit While ice remained at the glacier s top lower areas that had been covered 120 years ago were now completely bare Tourism at risk The land of fire and ice has become a growing tourist destination in recent years with more than two thirds of a million international visitors in 2012 according to the Icelandic Tourist Board Lured by its glacial beauty and recreational opportunities tourists spent a record 238 billion Icelandic kronur about 2 billion here last year putting the industry second to fishing as the island s biggest foreign money maker But the warming climate s assault is already evident at some popular attractions such as Solheimajokull where two would be ice climbers from Germany stared dejectedly at the wind swept dirt on that howling autumn day then trudged back to their van and drove away Not all Icelanders see their country s shrinking glaciers as a bad thing Glaciers historically posed a looming threat to nearby cities and farms which lost land to advancing ice and were occasionally

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/20/science-environment/beyond-ice-nations-slow-motion-loss (2014-01-13)
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  • Cheryl Katz | Business Spectator
    clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Cheryl Katz Beyond the ice A nation s slow motion loss From covering 10 per cent of the country s land mass glaciers may just be ice museums atop Iceland s highest peaks by as early as the mid 2100s by Cheryl Katz 8 32am December 20 1 comment Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators US labour

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/cheryl-katz (2014-01-13)
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