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  • Innovation | Business Spectator
    Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Innovation Last gasp for the clever country Australia stayed afloat during the GFC thanks to China s money and Wayne Swan did well not to stuff it up A far harder task awaits economic managers by Rob Burgess 8 45am July 18 21 comments Targeting of Holden workers unfair Kearney ACTU president says cutting workers pay will not save auto sector confirms she won t run for preselection 7 18am July 12 8 comments Dow calls for Aust policy reforms Chemical giant says it would lift spending in Australia under a new policy framework 3 17am June 11 Liveris calls for energy reforms Dow Chemical CEO urges reforms to boost manufacturing 5 14am June 07 2 comments High class steaks at the nation s innovation celebration Four scientists who backed their research into bovine tuberculosis eradication are a shining example of innovation bringing health and wealth to the nation by Robert Gottliebsen 1 30pm May 16 7 comments Productivity must be priority Argus Former BHP Billiton chair NAB CEO says government must focus on productivity innovation 12 51am March 23 GE on lookout for Australian M A targets Immelt CEO of industrial giant says Australia well placed to gain from growing Asian middle class 5 24am March 21 Page 2 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/economy/innovation?page=1 (2014-01-12)
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  • Innovation | Business Spectator
    reviews start the reforms The latest CEDA Business Spectator Big Issues survey outlines the business community s major concerns and highlights the need for the government to start taking action by Stephen Martin 11 08am December 16 8 comments Macfarlane s problem child The fate of the car industry theoretically rests with the Productivity Commission but Ian Macfarlane won t want to be known as the man who killed motoring by Liz van Acker 7 13am November 01 13 comments Killing off the lagging indicators An American upstart is taking a huge leap in the stagnant world of data collection Making economic indicators available every hour rather than every quarter will change how markets work by Daniel Palmer 7 28am October 25 3 comments The tech sector goes missing in action Deloitte s latest Positioning for Prosperity report makes an obvious and painful point for anyone who has an interest in the local tech industry The ICT sector is going nowhere in this country by James Riley 6 53am October 09 1 comment Navigating a social workplace Tapping the collective talent of an organisation is the first step in building a platform for innovation But making social work requires planning and a solid strategy by Cuneyt Uysal 8 51am October 01 McGauchie urges ag investment Nufarm AACo chairman says new govt has chance to capitalise on global food demand 7 57am September 30 1 comment A laundry list for Abbott s innovation nation A strong culture of innovation and entrepreneurship isn t created in a vacuum but encouraged by carefully coordinated policymaking and tax reform by Sandy Plunkett 3 07pm September 20 6 comments Five tips for crowdfunding success The model of appealing to the public to fund social undertakings may date back centuries but the likes of Kickstarter have taken it to a whole new level Here s how you plan a foray into crowdfunding by Deb Verhoeven and Lee Astheimer 8 12am September 20 Dyson sues Samsung in patent row Samsung accused of using patented technology in new vacuum 4 53am September 11 Big business and start ups a win win relationship Partnerships between enterprises and entrepreneurs offer significant benefits for both sides Developing and sustaining these partnerships may be the key to ensuring Australia s competitiveness in a global digital economy by Michael Stevens Jones 9 30am September 04 NBN benefits significant Deloitte Network to save households thousands of dollars by the end of the decade 12 55am September 04 5 comments The innovator s curse Innovation is not something that happens randomly or only through the incantations of a Chief Magical Officer There is a repeatable process for successful innovation which is something markets don t necessarily reward by Horace Dediu 9 19am August 28 1 comment Where will Australia s innovation injection come from Most of the world s new jobs will be software tech and IP centric But Australia s innovation moment the mass commercialisation of invention is nowhere in sight by Sandy Plunkett

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/economy/innovation?destination=taxonomy/term/2970 (2014-01-12)
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  • RBA still open to dollar intervention | Business Spectator
    future Having the Reserve Bank reserve fund at a prudent level is very important Mr Stevens told the committee The RBA board had a long run aim of increasing the fund to 15 billion Mr Stevens said he had discussed the reserve fund issue with Joe Hockey during his first meeting with the new treasurer after the election Asked by Labor MP Ed Husic whether he made a specific request to Mr Hockey Mr Stevens said I didn t go there saying could I please have 8 8 billion sign the cheque now That wasn t the nature of the conversation Mr Stevens declined to say who suggested the 8 8 billion figure although he did say Mr Hockey was very abreast on the issue of the fund s depletion He said it had been a concern to the RBA all along While the bank wasn t close to being insolvent and was able to carry out its functions unimpaired there was a genuine risk for taxpayers if the fund was depleted It is not a pretend risk in my opinion it is appropriate to put an amount of capital against that genuine risk Mr Stevens told the committee But it hasn t meant that we have been unable to conduct monetary policy or do our financial stability matters and no one was suggesting that Mr Stevens said he expected the RBA to provide a dividend to the federal government in August 2014 My expectation at this point would be unless there is a big event that happens in the next seven months come next August we would be making a dividend to the commonwealth in the normal way he said The RBA didn t pay the government a dividend in 2013 after handing over 500 million in 2012 Before the 8 8 billion grant the RBA reserve fund was around 2 5 billion Australian economy is better than most Stevens The Australian economy has its challenges but we re better off than most other countries and we re in an enviable economic position some years after the global financial crisis Governor Stevens said That s despite the federal government s revelation yesterday that the 2013 14 federal budget deficit had blown out by 17 billion since the election he said While the economy was currently experiencing below trend growth it was still 12 or 13 per cent bigger than it was before the GFC Mr Stevens said The banking system is stronger now than it was in 2008 and while unemployment is higher it remains low by historical standards and when compared with many other countries he said I think we have a record of macro economic success in that period that in all immodesty I suppose many other countries wish they had Mr Stevens said It s certainly true we have a buildup of government debt and that s a medium term challenge for us to address but it isn t actually about a surplus or a deficit

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/18/reserve-bank-australia/rba-still-open-dollar-intervention (2014-01-12)
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  • RBA repeats warning on high dollar | Business Spectator
    range the RBA said The transition from mining to non mining investment would occur but slowly Business investment had risen in the September quarter but mining investment was likely to decline over the next few years and while other areas of business investment could be expected to increase from current very weak levels that would take time the RBA said Resources exports were rising as the production phase of the resources boom gathered pace Labour market conditions remained soft with the participation rate declining the RBA said The central bank noted higher retail sales growth and retailers optimism ahead of Christmas as well as an increase in household consumption growth since the September quarter and above average consumer sentiment The bank noted Chinese growth that appeared stronger in the second half of the year than the first half saying it was likely to be around or even a little above the government s 7 5 per cent target US economic indicators were consistent with some improvement in output growth through the year driven primarily by private domestic demand with improvements in labour market conditions and mixed data for the housing market the RBA said RBA eyes March US taper The RBA noted stronger economic data from the United States saying it had again focused attention on when the Federal Reserve would start to unwind its highly expansionary policy settings The consensus view within financial markets remained for a tapering of the Fed s asset purchases to commence in March the RBA said The Fed had continued to emphasise that this move need not presage a near term increase in the policy rate and reflecting this US money market prices currently implied no increase in the policy rate until late in 2015 Members noted that the generally stronger US data recently had also contributed to an appreciation of the US dollar against most currencies during November with the pound sterling a notable exception The board noted increases in global share markets during November particularly in the US and Japan In contrast the Australian share market was little changed the RBA said Its underperformance relative to most other developed markets was a reflection of both the weaker performance and larger size of the resources sector in Australia Equity prices in many of the emerging markets had also been somewhat weaker over the past month Print this page Related articles 31 Dec Private sector credit rises in November 18 Dec The RBA s steely infrastructure warning 18 Dec RBA still open to dollar intervention 17 Dec Liquidity rules to hit bank customers 16 Dec Abbott s talking dollars and nonsense More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Stephen Kuehn Tue 2013 12 17 12 00 The AUD is not strong The real reason for the unfavourable AUD USD exchange rate is the USD

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/17/reserve-bank-australia/rba-repeats-warning-high-dollar (2014-01-12)
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  • Liquidity rules to hit bank customers | Business Spectator
    tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Liquidity rules to hit bank customers 17 Dec 2013 11 26 AM Economy Reserve Bank of Australia RBA s Debelle warns Basel III regulation will likely increase costs next year You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter New liquidity regulation is likely to lead to increased costs for bank customers Reserve Bank of Australia Assistant Governor for Financial Markets Guy Debelle says The Basel III regulation means banks need to have enough liquid assets that can be easily liquefied to meet any of their liabilities that fall due within a 30 day period Mr Debelle told a Sydney conference This implies that more liquid liabilities those with less than 30 days to maturity will be more costly for the bank to provide Mr Debelle said Hence one would expect to see an increase in the cost to the customer of obtaining that liquidity service We have seen this start to occur in Australia But my sense is that there is more of this repricing still to come Mr Debelle said the rate of return available on at call accounts does not seem to sufficiently reflect the cost to the bank of providing such liquidity The repricing may not happen until December 31 2014 as there is a competitive disadvantage in being the first to reprice the product he said Print this page Related articles 31 Dec

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/17/reserve-bank-australia/liquidity-rules-hit-bank-customers (2014-01-12)
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  • Bernard Keane & Glenn Dyer | Business Spectator
    in Europe and the US clearly show that the federal budget will not be repaired simply by cutting spending by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 3 28pm April 29 13 comments Hockey sees the light on the road to Treasury The last thing Australian needs right now is a budget surplus fetish Joe Hockey s decision not to chase austerity is a sensible submission to fiscal realities by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 1 35pm April 19 8 comments Shepherd dreams of kamikaze politicians Tony Shepherd has highlighted why it s difficult for governments to pursue tough reform Labor has fulfilled many of the Business Council s wishes yet faces electoral wipeout by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 2 41pm April 18 18 comments Reaching again for the rates potion In the strongest possible terms Guy Debelle has flagged that the Reserve Bank may cut rates further this time in response to the strong dollar by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 2 35pm February 26 Dollar starts drawing political currency Those on the ground realise that it s the mighty dollar not workplace flexibility or anything else that is biggest handbrake on competitiveness And the problem is belatedly shaping politics by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 4 28pm February 21 Labor s likely lay of the land If re elected Labor will adopt a less austere fiscal policy opt for industry support over trade rule changes handball housing to the Reserve Bank and most likely pass completely on GST reform by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 2 54pm February 06 5 comments A rough guide to an Abbott economy The Coalition has promised tax labour and fiscal reform if elected Yet despite the rhetoric the Australian economy may not look that different under an Abbott government at least for the first term by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 3 00pm February 05 6 comments Why life is more complicated than boom and bust For the mining layman you could get the impression that the drop in commodity prices seen recently is a disaster for all But a fall in prices will create winners as low cost suppliers take over by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 4 26pm September 20 4 comments Abbott s heavy economic deadlift The opposition don t seem to grasp the seriousness of Australia s fiscal position and it s time all politicians acknowledged we have far less control over our economic circumstances than claimed by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 4 45pm March 20 5 comments Abbott s talking dollars and nonsense The prime minister drew a bow this week between the central bank s 9 billion government top up and a lower Australian dollar revealing an alarming lack of understanding about monetary policy by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 2 18pm December 16 33 comments Saluting Swan An unsung legacy Wayne Swan may not have implemented great reforms or been a powerful political persuader But on jobs debt and inflation he avoided disaster by Bernard Keane Glenn Dyer 1 47pm July 02 47 comments Rerouting

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/bernard-keane-glenn-dyer (2014-01-12)
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  • Stevens warns against hubris | Business Spectator
    who asked for an update on the early reaction of financial markets to news of the Lehman collapse New Zealand and Australia were among the first markets to open in the hours following the news Still Mr Stevens said his career at the central bank has been punctuated by private doubts He nearly quit the bank a couple of times after headhunters came calling as they did successfully with several colleagues There was a time and I think many people will experience this in the public sector when you have got a young family and a mortgage You could have turned left out of the train station in the morning instead of right and be paid 50 per cent or 100 per cent more Mr Stevens said Mr Stevens has a thick skin and a pragmatic streak though that has allowed him not to be swayed by public or political opinion according to former and current board members of the central bank Recently that pragmatism has led him to slash rates to reinvigorate an economy at risk of sinking just as the US and Europe show signs of recovery I think that some of the big jurisdictions are still in crisis management mode a little bit Mr Stevens said These economies are growing but the legacy of the crisis period is still very much with them The dilemma now for Mr Stevens though is that rate cuts haven t yet yielded the response the bank had hoped for The economy expanded by just 2 3 in the year through September much slower than quarterly growth rates as high as 4 per cent last year Business investment outside of mining remains weak And while construction and retail sales are recovering the nation s exporters are still grappling with a strong Australian dollar exchange rate buoyed by the easy money policies in the US and elsewhere At the same time Mr Stevens faces the risk that in keeping rates low the bank is pushing up already frothy house prices which recently surpassed a 2010 peak The central bank on Tuesday kept interest rates steady for the fourth straight month saying it needed to see more proof the economy was rebalancing away from mining before it could rule out further cuts With the economy still too weak to raise rates as it did in 2009 and 2010 to head off a nascent housing bubble Mr Stevens is left with few options to aid the slowing economy other than talking the currency down The challenge now for Australian lawmakers is to nurture long term growth through productivity gains said Mr Stevens As a country we have to go get it It doesn t just land in our lap he said Relative to most major developed economies Australia s economic challenge looks achievable What s needed is a return to the reform agenda of the 1980s and 1990s That period produced a lot of change that paid off There s no reason why that can t be done again Mr Stevens said referring to a period when the country floated its currency deregulated banks and financial markets and reduced tariff barriers which helped to spur sharp productivity gains I m reasonably optimistic he said We need to be doing things that foster innovation and productivity Print this page Related articles 13 Jan Abbott to pursue red tape cuts 12 Jan Obama picks Fed vice chair 11 Jan US jobs growth slows sharply 10 Jan Korea China jostle for Aust resources 10 Jan China trade balance contracts More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Mark Welch Mon 2013 12 09 09 30 A puff piece Business Spectator should aim higher than this Was Stevens bold after Lehman At that point it looked like the bottom had dropped out of the financial world and to drop our rates 1 was no specially big thing And it only countered the RBA s bizarre RAISING of rates early in 2008 His current warnings about hubris and the cyclicity of our economy are flabby and come 5 to 10 years too late And we have to stop repeating the smug myth that he Rudd and Swan saved us from the GFC CHINA SAVED US FROM THE GFC But because of China our economy is much more cyclical than it was 10 years ago Dutch Disease is not a risk WE HAVE DUTCH DISEASE The economy has hollowed out A huge problem and it will take great courage for Abbott to avoid the tempting populist solution destructive subsidy Like Thatcher s mythic metaphor he ll have to plug his ears with wax to avoid that Siren s call I see hubris as a minor issue There is a great sense of entitlement here we poor white trash of Asia Lee Kuan Yew think we DESERVE properity a weird notion but almsot universal But that s no different to 30 years ago and I currently see much nervousness about our future which is good A combination of fear and courage is the right mindset for now Ken not available Mon 2013 12 09 10 37 Mark I like your statement it explained the article as it is subjective would be the most flattering word that I could use If Glenn Stevens avoids using the cash rate except upward then he might prove that he is a thinker Robin MacAdam Mon 2013 12 09 10 54 The RBA should have matched all our trading partners years ago We all know it Every day now we see another Aussie Company in trouble now Qantas What a crock Saved us from the GFC Put my children and grandchildren into debt for 2 generations when is the RBA going to act to drive down the still rediculous exchange rate Cut rates again intervene just like every

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/9/economy/stevens-warns-against-hubris (2014-01-12)
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  • RBA holds cash rate at record low 2.5 per cent | Business Spectator
    Australia keeps official cash rate on hold repeats concerns about uncomfortably high Australian dollar You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter The Reserve Bank of Australia RBA has kept the official cash rate on hold saying it will continue to adjust policy as needed At its December meeting the RBA board left the rate at a record low of 2 5 per cent where it has been since the last cut in August The central bank repeated its concerns that the Australian dollar is still uncomfortably high adding a lower level will likely be needed to achieve balanced growth in the economy The RBA said it will continue to adjust policy as needed to foster sustainable growth in demand The easing in monetary policy that has occurred since late 2011 has supported interest sensitive spending and asset values but the full effects of the changes are still coming through the bank said The central bank noted recent signs of increased household demand for finance but said the pace of borrowing has remained relatively subdued There is also continuing evidence of a shift in savers behaviour in response to declining returns on low risk assets RBA Governor Glenn Stevens said Housing and equity markets have strengthened further over recent months trends which should in time be supportive of investment Governor Stevens said it was still unclear how persistent a recent improvement in household and business sentiment will be He noted the unemployment rate has edged higher and the economy has been growing a bit below trend saying this was likely to persist in the near term as the economy adjusts to lower levels of mining investment Further ahead private demand outside the mining sector is expected to increase at a faster pace though considerable uncertainty surrounds this outlook Governor Stevens said The bank noted inflation was running consistent with the medium term target saying this is likely to remain the case over the next one to two years Global financial conditions remain very accommodative with global growth a bit below average this year and reasonable prospects of a pick up next year the bank said Earlier all 14 economists surveyed by AAP predicted the bank would keep rates steady Last month the bank took a stronger position on its desire to see the Australian dollar fall further RBA Monetary Policy Decision December pdf RBA Monetary Policy Decision December pdf Print this page Related articles 31 Dec Private sector credit rises in November 18 Dec The RBA s steely infrastructure warning 18 Dec RBA still open to dollar intervention 17 Dec RBA repeats warning on high dollar

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/3/reserve-bank-australia/rba-holds-cash-rate-record-low-25-cent (2014-01-12)
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