archive-au.com » AU » B » BUSINESSSPECTATOR.COM.AU

Total: 1320

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Killing off the lagging indicators | Business Spectator
    consumer price inflation only released once every quarter Even then it s not available until three weeks after the quarter ends The majority of indicators and indices today are based on decades old models and manual reporting structures that don t reflect the profoundly accelerated nature of the globe s economic life explains David Soloff the co founder of a new data group that could shake up the status quo Premise Data Corp can tell you right now that inflation in the US picked up from early September and has largely kept rising ever since It can also advise its customers that Chinese food inflation has become an increasing problem since the latest official figures came out from Beijing Premise reaches these conclusions through the analysis of data from traditional bricks and mortar stores as well as online retailers In all the San Francisco based upstart captures between 40 000 and 50 000 data points every hour by merging an offline library created by 7 000 part time workers taking pictures of retail prices with online information from over 30 000 e commerce websites As the below graph shows the Chinese numbers were broadly tracking that of the official figures before the last data release Since then Premise has noted a strong lift in food inflation which has significant ramifications for the direction of monetary policy in the world s second largest economy If the numbers are accurate policy easing may be off the agenda for a while and signs of weakness in the economy will be harder to address Chinese food inflation Black line represents Premise data blue line indicates official government figures Source Premise Premise which currently has teams in 29 cities including Sydney Gold Coast and Melbourne only launched its daily statistics offering last week but its founders have been working for two years to develop the systems for collecting and analysing inflation It already has attracted the attention of Google through the financial support of its venture capital firm Google Ventures It has also received backing from venture capital firms Harrison Metal and Andreessen Horowitz the latter is well known for its successful investments in Facebook Skype Groupon and Twitter Google and Andreessen aren t the only big names involved with Alan Krueger former chairman of President Obama s Council of Economic Advisers serving as an advisor alongside Google s chief economist Hal Varian Since last week s launch it has seen a steady flow of inquiries with businesses and policymakers interested for a simple reason the promise of faster more timely and more accurate data We founded Premise in 2012 because existing mechanisms of econometric data gathering are insufficient to meet the policy trading relief or business strategy challenges posed by an era of unprecedented economic and social volatility is how Soloff explained it last week Premise s ability to offer immediate insight may even help sooth volatility Wednesday for instance the Aussie dollar jumped half a cent directly after the release of quarterly inflation

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/25/information-technology/killing-lagging-indicators (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive


  • The tech sector goes missing in action | Business Spectator
    logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The Deloitte Positioning for Prosperity report released this week makes an obvious and painful point for anyone who has an interest in the Australian tech sector The report identifies five super growth industry sectors that will combined contribute an additional 250 billion to the national economy over the next 20 years These five industries would form the backbone of a powerful new diversified Australian economy no longer reliant on the resources sector Which is all good news for Australians Especially for those Australians working in the super growth industries of Agribusiness Gas Tourism International Education and Wealth Management But for the ICT sector or more specifically the tech start up sector not so much This is the obvious and painful point The technology industry is going nowhere in this country The Deloitte report puts forward an interesting and defensible argument about the growth markets of the next 20 years And of course I have exaggerated The ICT industry does make an appearance as a tiny tiny dot positioned in the low growth low comparable advantage small opportunity portion of its explanatory graphic It is identified as one of 14 sectors important to continued prosperity of the nation It doesn t matter whether you agree that ICT is a low growth small opportunity sector The reality is that s the business community perception as evidenced by a serious report from serious economists from a tier one consulting house ICT sector interests in Australia are badly organised and disenfranchised fragmented and poorly articulated hamstrung by the puffed up self importance of its leadership and drowning in the self interest of its calls to action So the Deloitte report paints a genuinely optimistic picture for the Australian economy for the next 20 years an economy diversified beyond its current reliance on the resources sector And it paints a particularly optimistic future for Australia s ability to capitalise on the next phase of economic growth in Asia where some three billion more people will join the middle class by the middle of the century It is simply jarring to see such high profile economists so dismissive of the tech sector because it is damaging to an indigenous ICT industry that struggles to get any profile with government and business leaders Still Deloitte provides a good window into the markets where Australian companies can look for opportunities and how engagement with Asia will deliver for the economy This is where Australian tech companies can reap rewards These same fast growing and maturing markets to our north identified by Deloitte present huge opportunities for Australian technology companies whether Deloitte cares to

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/9/technology/tech-sector-goes-missing-action (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • James Riley | Business Spectator
    new with its start up incubator muru D Despite its track record of consuming companies whole or tearing them apart for the sake of useful innovation Telstra is attempting to facilitate start ups without smothering them by James Riley 8 04am October 22 3 comments Into the wilderness Labor s tech leadership Jason Clare is not a bad choice for the communications portfolio but the Shorten shadow cabinet is also carrying a lot of old baggage Here s a guide to who s who on the Opposition front ranks by James Riley 8 31am October 21 8 comments Comms on the backburner in Labor s shadow cabinet In tech industry terms Bill Shorten isn t a bad choice to lead Labor However with Kate Lundy and Ed Husic both out of the shadow cabinet is the opposition strong enough to tackle Turnbull on the NBN and ICT issues by James Riley 10 05am October 15 3 comments The tech sector goes missing in action Deloitte s latest Positioning for Prosperity report makes an obvious and painful point for anyone who has an interest in the local tech industry The ICT sector is going nowhere in this country by James Riley 6 53am October 09 1 comment Who will lead the Coalition s ICT agenda The Australian technology sector may be well represented in the cabinet but can it reasonably hope to be a priority industry under an Abbott government by James Riley 10 01am September 30 2 comments Creating a digital economy super portfolio The public service can have a huge role in building an innovation culture through the rest of the economy But to make that happen the responsibility for the ICT sector needs to move away from the oily rag end of the Department of Industry s policy sheet by James Riley 10 30am August 23 4 comments Preparing for the Chinese venture capital boom Chinese venture capitalists are setting their sights on Australia but it s not all good news The Australian tech sector has no relationship with China and that disconnect could deter investors by James Riley 10 04am August 15 2 comments Crowdsourcing the worm the Aussie start up tracking the election debate The polling worm used by the Seven Network during Rudd Abbott debate last night broke significant new ground and it s just the tip of the iceberg for Sydney based start up iPowow by James Riley 10 34am August 12 2 comments Murdoch s refreshing take on Australia s tech sector We don t need to become a Silicon Valley or an Israel or Germany to establish a successful tech sector We have a good thing going here and as Rupert Murdoch says we need to harness talent immigration to grow it by James Riley 9 54am November 05 5 comments Shutting the doors on Huawei The Attorney General hasn t left much wriggle room for Huawei when it comes to the NBN and despite its charm offensive the Chinese giant just

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/james-riley (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Navigating a social workplace | Business Spectator
    When implemented well they bring energy drive enthusiasm and encourage collaboration They empower people by tapping into the collective talent of the organisation and providing a platform for innovation To make social work however requires planning and a solid strategy The first rule for the success of any social initiative in the workplace is that social relies on integration to daily work If the social activities are not part of the natural information or workflow they will inevitably fail The second rule for success is that when you introduce social technologies they must focus on work If the technologies and their application don t demonstrate business value you should be questioning why you are considering going down this path In addition social deployments work best when based on a social adoption framework Unlike traditional change models which are typically linear the social framework is far more humanistic and therefore calls for a journey rather than simply working towards a go live deadline The ideal framework is made up of three components people engagement business alignment and technology enablement People engagement For people to use social tools they must be engaged This is where strategies are required to motivate and encourage participation The strategies must be mindful of company culture and should address the need for community management education recognition and campaigns to drive adoption If you want to make your social initiative more than a three day wonder and if you are to truly embed your social tools in the daily workflow the process of people engagement will be never ending It should start with onboarding and span the life of your social workplace initiative One engagement tactic that has proven very successful in numerous organisations is the concept of an ambassador network With training and judicious use of rewards ambassadors or power users can help to spread the social word defuse resisters and build trust across the organisation Networks of ambassadors empower advocates and tap into the natural energy of emergent leaders who are passionate about the potential for social in the workplace Business Alignment The second component of a social adoption framework is business alignment Business alignment activities are usually structured around understanding organisational context This requires creating easy to understand statements around vision mission and values and then tying those statements to the key strategic intent across the business One of the earliest indicators of success top level leadership support for the project should be visible at this point It is worth noting that few social initiatives will succeed without the interest and participation of senior management and other major stakeholders Business alignment also involves governance to address IT or other potential risks and the development of socially enabled processes Because social is such a different way of working the business should consider a change management strategy All of these steps are essential because they allow the business to achieve value from their social initiatives faster and as already stated this is one of the foundation rules

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/1/technology/navigating-social-workplace (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cuneyt Uysal | Business Spectator
    weak day for European markets Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Cuneyt Uysal Navigating a social workplace Tapping the collective talent of an organisation is the first step in building a platform for innovation But making social work requires planning and a solid strategy by Cuneyt Uysal 8 51am October 01 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Harnessing the power of the one man brand Ken Phillips 10 Jan 1 58 PM 2

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/cuneyt-uysal (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • McGauchie urges ag investment | Business Spectator
    Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu McGauchie urges ag investment 30 Sep 2013 7 57 AM 1 Industries Agribusiness Economy Innovation Productivity Nufarm AACo chairman says new govt has chance to capitalise on global food demand You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter The change in government as a result of the recent federal election gives Australia a second chance to leverage its agribusiness sector to meet global food demand according to Nufarm Ltd and Australian Agricultural Company Ltd AACo chairman and GrainCorp Ltd director Donald McGauchie But in an interview with the Business Spectator s KGB Mr McGauchie suggested that the change in government alone will not be enough to help the sector meet its growth potential He cited the previous Labor government s handling of the Indonesia live cattle export ban a move he called a very unfortunate decision to say the least and one that disgraced us with a neighbour and a trading partner who was such a good customer of ours and the new Abbott government s pledge to be more business friendly as encouraging signs for a sector of the economy that will need foreign capital and foreign customers to reach its growth potential We have a magnificent agricultural base which is grossly underdeveloped Mr McGauchie said What I m taking most notice of was what Tony Abbott said on the evening of the election Australia is open for business That means selling things buying things having people invest He said that the key to Australia s agricultural sector growth will be targeting middle class consumers around the world rather than trying to compete with low cost competitors abroad We re not a low cost country but we are a high quality country he said If we produce the right sort of product and feed into this massively growing market there ll be in excess of three billion people with a middle class income by the middle of the century in the countries to the north of us which is five times the population of the United States and Europe combined Mr McGauchie added that agricultural productivity will be the key to helping Australia meet its agribusiness growth potential

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/9/30/agribusiness/mcgauchie-urges-ag-investment (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A laundry list for Abbott's innovation nation | Business Spectator
    and legacy ways of doing things The scarcest resource is not technology but technological imagination Australia like most other developed and developing nations is in transition from a high wage low productivity economy to a more diversified one that fosters knowledge based enterprises as well as more traditional sources of wealth such as mining Economists and policymakers globally believe the key to improving competitiveness and productivity is by developing innovation and enterprise at all levels of an industry ecosystem Innovation tends to be technology and internet driven but requires new creativity in other areas such as business models global benchmarking design integration and management practices Educating for the new skills of this new era is also critical As Professor Roy Green dean of UTS Business School says Australia can only compete as a high cost economy by moving up the value chain through uniqueness creativity and agility Innovation and entrepreneurship are not triggered in a vacuum Policymaking and government stimulants in targeted and highly coordinated areas the nexus between Communications Industry Trade Education and Finance and Treasury is key to fostering the right climate for sustained investment in innovation driven enterprises that can scale and compete globally Historically Australia has not had a deep entrepreneurial class in the tech sector Our innovation status rates relatively poorly in numerous global rankings and our productivity has stalled Much of this is cultural shaped by a long history of success derived from farming real estate and mining ventures Dutch disease en masse perhaps Start up and risk capital for the newer engines of economic growth digital businesses is comparatively scarce in Australia And unlike other successful innovation economies such as the US and Israel there is very little tolerance for failure and the lessons we learn from it Moreover efforts by those intent on starting and scaling innovation enterprises have been further stymied by the relative absence of a vibrant local IPO market and punitive taxation policy most notably the complex treatment of stock options for high growth companies There is a laundry list of stuff the new government needs to focus on to change this culture Entrepreneurs and venture capitalists need access to capital and a fertile and globally linked networking environment as well as a clear exit path for their risk and investment bigger businesses need to develop a more entrepreneurial mindset and better support smaller companies products and services the regulatory burden on businesses needs to be eased and research and development organisations need to better align their work to commercially oriented outcomes So how may the Coalition government help or hinder all this Leading industry participants believe that better teamwork and co ordination between like minded Coalition ministers in connected portfolios will be a good start While re defining the beleaguered NBN Co and its related contractual arrangements is a key focus of Turnbull it is believed much of the detailed work will fall to his parliamentary secretary Paul Fletcher the Liberal MP for Bradfield This could in time free Turnbull up to focus on related technology ecosystem issues and strategies such as the government s cloud computing strategy Turnbull and Fletcher are also some of the most informed and progressive policy thinkers for the start up and venture capital sector This is a process and we are only at step one says Hamish Hawthorn the chief executive of technology and life sciences incubator ATP Innovations But there is a lot to be encouraged about Newly appointed Minister for Industry Ian McFarlane is viewed by many as a welcome change from Sophie Mirabella who was broadly criticised for her divisiveness and the failure to produce anything close to an Industry policy document pre election McFarlane and Minister for Trade Andrew Robb may make for better alignment Assistant Treasurer Senator Arthur Sinodinos is also expected to be a significant asset to Treasurer Joe Hockey and a key advocate for much needed reforms of prohibitive tax structures and other regulatory burdens facing businesses small and large It is harder to assess what new education initiatives there will be under Education Minister Christopher Pyne especially in terms of fostering greater participation in the critical science engineering technology and maths degrees needed for innovation economies Australian companies especially tech start ups are starved of appropriately qualified people It is equally unclear just how the sharing of the science portfolio between Education and Industry will work in the near to long term As for major innovation and business improvement programs UTS Green says the Coalition s pre election policy costings and commitments provide grounds for cautious optimism He says The programs to survive at this stage although we may yet hear to the contrary include Enterprise Connect Commercialisation Australia and the newly announced Innovation Partnerships There are mixed reviews in the Coalition about the efficacy of innovation programs especially given Sophie Mirabella had indicated an intention to scrap the partnerships as they are currently constituted It s wait and see Print this page More from Sandy Plunkett 02 Oct Keeping an eye on the digital spies 19 Aug The NBN s high speed path to where 09 Aug Where will Australia s innovation injection come from Related articles 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Google s obey or perish rules of the internet 06 Jan Where the new jobs are 20 Dec iBuy shares rise on debut 20 Dec Roy Hill secures US700m loan More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Roy Alb Fri 2013 09 20 17 04 The first step is to recognise the problem The problem is that technologically we are NOT a DEVELOPED country If we want to preserve our high standard of living we MUST URGENTLY develop and implement policies that will enhance the hi tech industry During the weeks leading to the last election I

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/20/information-technology/laundry-list-abbotts-innovation-nation (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Sandy Plunkett | Business Spectator
    users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Sandy Plunkett Keeping an eye on the digital spies In the digital age regulatory oversight is playing catch up with technology The advent of warrantless surveillance and data tracking will raise ethical questions for lawmakers by Sandy Plunkett 6 23am October 02 A laundry list for Abbott s innovation nation A strong culture of innovation and entrepreneurship isn t created in a vacuum but encouraged by carefully coordinated policymaking and tax reform by Sandy Plunkett 3 07pm September 20 6 comments The NBN s high speed path to where With the mining boom on its last legs Australia will have to look to the technology and services sector for new sources of wealth by Sandy Plunkett 6 46am August 19 16 comments Where will Australia s innovation injection come from Most of the world s new jobs will be software tech and IP centric But Australia s innovation moment the mass commercialisation of invention is nowhere in sight by Sandy Plunkett 1 10pm August 09 29 comments Keeping an eye on the digital spies In the digital age regulatory oversight is playing catch up with technology The advent of warrantless surveillance and data tracking will raise ethical questions for lawmakers by Sandy Plunkett 6 23am October 02 A laundry list for Abbott s innovation nation A strong culture of innovation and entrepreneurship isn t created in a vacuum but encouraged by carefully coordinated policymaking and tax reform by Sandy Plunkett 3 07pm September 20 6 comments The NBN s high speed path to where With the mining

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/sandy-plunkett (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive