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  • The Distillery: Murray mistrust | Business Spectator
    system rapidly changing his expertise sure could come in handy Murray is a man of formidable experience in the financial system with no current business ties or vested interests and has the capacity to carve out another role for himself in the public service He is a tough and experienced operator who could well overcome some initial perceptions of being rewarded for being a loyal Liberal Party supporter with strong ties into the banking system and the big end of town But the proof of course will be in the pudding The risk of course is that the pudding is half baked The Australian s John Durie rates Murray s intelligence highly but is adamant he wasn t the best choice available to Treasurer Joe Hockey David Murray is eminently capable of leading the government s landmark financial inquiry but he is a divisive figure perceived as a big business banker and is on any read the wrong person for the job However if Hockey erred in his choice of chairman he at least delivered in spades with wide ranging terms of reference leaving the Murray inquiry with plenty of scope to lay down a comprehensive road map for the future Fairfax s Malcolm Maiden agrees that there is a big opportunity for improvements but worries it might not be taken There is no particular focus and that creates both promise and risk for the probe that Hockey has asked former Commonwealth Bank managing director David Murray to conduct History tells us that inquiries that recommend changes the government isn t looking for gather dust Some fear that the appointment of Murray a high conviction personality increases that risk Business Spectator s Stephen Bartholomeusz meanwhile singles out one area of particular interest for the inquiry technological change The big four Aussie banks have readied themselves for an onslaught from new digital competition but are the regulators ready Digital challengers have wreaked havoc on other sectors The media and the music industries are classic examples The banking system is however at the core of the financial system and ultimately the economy No regulator or legislator would want to see it destabilised It is indeed an interesting time for the banking sector with the increasingly fragmented industry in the US where online only banks are gaining an increasing share of the market portending to change ahead Australia s big banks are more prepared however given their stronger balance sheets and more powerful competitive position In company news the board of retailer David Jones is set to confront a hostile reception at its AGM today in light of recent criticism of the group s succession planning and the controversial purchase of shares by two directors just prior to the release of sales numbers For The Australian s Blair Speedy the developments mean outgoing chief executive Paul Zahra will be left trying to feign enthusiasm for two hours with his performance crucial to a shareholder vote he wants to go his way on remuneration

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/22/leadership/distillery-murray-mistrust (2014-01-12)
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  • The Distillery | Business Spectator
    but one notes it gets preferential treatment of a different kind by The Distillery 7 00am November 19 The Distillery Foreign skies Some jotters argue foreign ownership restrictions give Qantas ground to its Virgin gripe but one notes it gets preferential treatment of a different kind by The Distillery 7 00am November 19 The Distillery Split job Scribes are divided on what Australia s jobs numbers are telling us while others examine the foreign takeover talking points around GrainCorp and WCB by The Distillery 6 55am November 18 The Distillery Jet fuels Jotters agree Virgin s backers are in for the long haul in their Qantas dogfight with one spying a battle between Tigerair and Jetstar on the horizon by The Distillery 7 05am November 15 The Distillery Murray Goulburn sours Jotters say while Murray Goulburn s sweetened WCB bid has bought it time regulatory hurdles farmer opposition and renewed rival bids could yet get in the way by The Distillery 7 30am November 14 The Distillery Canadian Hockey Jotters argue Joe Hockey s decision to green light Saputo is too quick while a speech by Abbott s lead economic advisor rankles by The Distillery 7 20am November 13 2 comments The Distillery Urban alchemy Jotters heap praise on Transurban Group s bid for control of the Cross City Tunnel with one eyeing an even bigger deal on the horizon by The Distillery 7 16am November 12 The Distillery RBA growing pains Jotters are mixed on the RBA s next move following its growth downgrade while a few spy danger ahead for QE inflated equities by The Distillery 6 58am November 11 The Distillery DJs discontent Commentators take aim at David Jones corporate governance while others ponder the challenges ahead for Fairfax Media by The Distillery 6 54am November 08 The Distillery Tax tricks Scribes pore over the Coalition tax changes praising proper process lashing the FBT call and warning of a budget war by The Distillery 7 24am November 07 The Distillery RBA jawboning Scribes sympathise with the Reserve Bank which is stuck between a strong dollar and a hard place and eye possible effects of the Fed s next move by The Distillery 7 00am November 06 The Distillery Bank bonanza Scribes applaud Westpac s solid profit as a win for customers and a warning to its peers while economists say a rates hold is a sure thing by The Distillery 6 59am November 05 Page 1 The Distillery Skyfall Jotters consider the options for struggling Qantas with one labelling foreign ownership complaints a smokescreen for the government guarantee it really wants by The Distillery 6 57am November 29 The Distillery Elders grief Scribes examine departing Elders chief Malcolm Jackman s legacy and find a mixed record while Archer Daniels Midland is hoping its upscaled GrainCorp bid will sway Joe Hockey by The Distillery 6 57am November 28 2 comments The Distillery Ansell s stretched glove Jotters laud Ansell s big US acquisition but one asks whether the

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/distillery (2014-01-12)
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  • Today's CEOs don't know how to grow a business | Business Spectator
    achieve growth First the exception Back in 1963 Triguboff chose a strategy that at the time was disruptive Back 50 years ago the home building industry in Sydney was dominated by cottages Triguboff believed people would live in apartments Last week five American institutions returned from Australia determined to invest in companies that are disrupting the majors US hedge funds are lining up Australian banks November 8 When Triguboff built his first small apartment block he was funded by the ANZ Bank For the next 50 years the ANZ has remained his lead banker Today it s very fashionable to shop around bankers In the building industry sub contractors are a key to success but these days they are often treated badly by big builders Triguboff realised that the only way he could keep the extreme unions at bay was to have a steady stream of work and look after the good sub contractors When a sub contractor gets into financial bother and from time to time that happens he makes sure the employees of that sub contractor are looked after In modern Australia there is no feeling of obligation to look after the sub contractors staff if there is a failure What Triguboff is doing is very similar to what Lend Lease s Dick Dusseldorp did in the same era Dusseldorp established the companies that went on to become Lend Lease a few years before Triguboff established Meriton Bruno Grollo fostered a similar strategy In staff management Triguboff believes in being ruthless in removing staff in the first few months But once employees have got through that initial period they are on their way to being a long term employee In today s world suppliers are to be driven down with more and more tendering competition In the case of Meriton Boral has been supplying the group s concrete for almost all the 50 years In the 1960s the late Elton Griffin had taken Boral into quarries and pre mixed concrete and the thrust into building materials was accelerated by his successor Eric Neal Similarly BHP OneSteel now called Arrium has provided most of the Meriton steel over the past 50 years Triguboff believed that by sticking with one main supplier it would look after you in shortages and you would gain the best prices That is the reverse of what many managers do today But most are after short term profits rather than building businesses Print this page More from Robert Gottliebsen 06 Jan The Middle Kingdom s Australian frontier 03 Jan The next big crunch facing Australian companies 02 Jan Wheels turn in online retail s favour 31 Dec Letter to Alan Kohler 31 Dec Abbott must fix small business in 2014 Connect with Robert Gottliebsen on Google Related articles 16 Dec Stop the reviews start the reforms 11 Dec Keating had all the fun Abbott cops all the pain 05 Dec CEO departure pay to fall report 02 Dec Time to stop the budget finger pointing 22 Nov The Distillery Murray mistrust More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Bruce Moon Fri 2013 11 15 09 45 Robert Your article today points to a cultural matter But that issue obfuscates Go to France and in any decent cafe or restaurant the waitstaff consider their job a career The employer treats them as one of the family and the staff treat the employer as a master Go to Japan and a similar scenario prevails There staff have been known to commit suicide if they can t appropriately serve their employer In both France and Japan large firms have emerged since WW2 and each utilised this patriarchal model of industrial relations I ve used but two examples to show an alternate culture than that adopted by corporate capitalism Implicitely the entrenchment of support is anathema to any business driver that places profit as the foremost motive I doubt that Harry Triguboff used the patriarchal model of industrial relations But it would be unlikely that he did not also bring his homeland culture for respect for staff with him as he developed his business Given all this I doubt that the culture of a patriachal styled business is a driver for growth Rather you have selected two examples of business growth where the principle has respect for people You could have also included Andrew Forest Central in these people is a childhood where respecting the intrinsic humanity of people was paramount I suggest the implicit matter in your article is that each of the exemplars had a business model that rode with a growth industry And by accumulating a good team around them and respecting that team the business wasn t white anted from within I suggest the last sentence isn t part of the American business model which so many slavishly follow Cheers Tony Holland Fri 2013 11 15 09 56 Of course I was very young way back in the 60 s when I joined Dueseldorps planing team and I well remember an ex navy commander who had learned about PERT and discarded it in favour of a vector technique resulting in bar chart and S curve projections for an integrated building company that could supply everything needed to complete The funniest story I can remember was when Dusseldorp shock this ex navy commanders hand and loudly farted no one dared to laugh and Dusseldorp just continued talking as though nothing had happened Bruce Moon Fri 2013 11 15 10 08 Robert Your article today points to a cultural matter But that issue obfuscates Go to France and in any decent cafe or restaurant the waitstaff consider their job a career The employer treats them as one of the family and the staff treat the employer as a master Go to Japan and a similar scenario prevails

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/15/leadership/todays-ceos-dont-know-how-grow-business (2014-01-12)
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  • Top CEOs pressure suppliers on diversity | Business Spectator
    into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Top CEOs pressure suppliers on diversity 6 Nov 2013 3 10 PM Economy Leadership Telstra CBA ANZ execs encourage gender equality measures through suppliers You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter A group of male Australian business leaders including executives from top ASX listed companies is putting pressure on suppliers to enact gender diversity policies In a report released today leaders from ANZ Banking Group Ltd Commonwealth Bank of Australia Ltd Telstra Ltd Qantas Ltd ASX Ltd Woolworths Ltd IBM Australia Citi Australia and Treasury said they implemented initiatives last month to promote gender equality was through their supply chains The Male Champions for Change group s Supplier Multiplier measures could impact 54 000 suppliers and 30 billion of procurement spending across the group the report said The measures include updating firms supplier code of conduct to set clear expectations on gender balance goals performance measures and make up of supplier teams among Tier 1 suppliers We believe there will be immense benefits to Australia when all organisations actively pursue gender balance said ANZ chief executive officer Mike Smith The pipeline will increase diversity of perspectives will help innovation and better decision making he said The Accelerating the advancement of women in leadership report comes as the Business Council of Australia BCA also this week outlined measures for improving gender diversity among Australian firms The Male Champions for Change group was established in 2010 by Sex Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick It comprises 21 CEOs department heads and non

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/6/leadership/top-ceos-pressure-suppliers-diversity (2014-01-12)
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  • Stephen Koukoulas | Business Spectator
    for the Fed This morning s US data release shows the employment rate is the lowest it s been since 2008 despite another 148 000 jobs created in September It s easy to see why monetary policy will remain loose by Stephen Koukoulas 7 07am October 23 17 comments Running of the market bulls This stock market recovery is based on sounder fundamentals than the 2007 peaks But it has a long way to run and by the end of 2014 a 10 per cent rise could be on the cards by Stephen Koukoulas 7 03am October 22 109 comments A measuring stick for the shutdown s shock A true read on the health of the US economy is unlikely before well into the new year with the market prepared to discount most of the data set for release this week by Stephen Koukoulas 6 54am October 21 Hockey s lenience lies in his debt ceiling By looking to increase Australia s debt ceiling by 100 billion Joe Hockey is not pursuing the kind of budget restraint he promised during the election It needn t be that way by Stephen Koukoulas 7 26am October 18 68 comments The US remains in a fiscal pickle Barack Obama emerged triumphant overnight but the debt battle has done ongoing damage to the US recovery And debt ceiling uncertainty will inevitably re emerge within months by Stephen Koukoulas 6 39am October 17 92 comments Wait on the size of the RBA s bang The Reserve Bank s language is cheery and failing a catastrophe indicates the next move should be a hike GDP growth at 3 75 per cent in 2014 could also be on the cards by Stephen Koukoulas 7 15am October 16 10 comments First home buyers are not locked out First home buyers are not being priced out of the market In real terms prices are rising slower than elsewhere and the current average loan repayments to income ratio is the best it s been in decades by Stephen Koukoulas 7 18am October 15 124 comments The Tea Party s bitter Japanese flavour If its budget deficit isn t reined in the US risks being unable to implement further stimulus when needed Simple tax hikes are the next logical step but the Tea Party isn t budging by Stephen Koukoulas 7 08am October 14 29 comments The RBA s interest rate playbook The RBA s economic charts highlight how reliant Australia has become on China They also show an economy where most major indicators are generally pointing in the right direction by Stephen Koukoulas 7 43am October 04 66 comments Build it and growth will come The RBA will be eyeing a continued pick up in dwelling construction to not only help plug a hole in our transitioning economy but keep house prices in check by Stephen Koukoulas 7 16am October 03 15 comments The Republic of Crazy At US300 million a day and counting the economic fallout from the US government shutdown could be just a taste of things to come if Republicans continue to hijack budgetary process by Stephen Koukoulas 7 16am October 02 114 comments Why 2014 will be the year of the rate hike Interest rates will be left alone by the Reserve Bank board today But get ready for hikes in 2014 when inflation rises and the labour market turns around by Stephen Koukoulas 6 58am October 01 31 comments No urgency in the budget emergency The recently released budget outcome reveals a different economic landscape to what Joe Hockey described For a start it showed the largest year to year fall in the budget deficit ever by Stephen Koukoulas 7 04am September 30 44 comments A few home truths to quash the hysterics Rest assured all that s happening to house prices now is a catch up from falls triggered by the GFC by Stephen Koukoulas 7 10am September 27 161 comments Page 1 Stevens murky dollar premonitions The RBA governor drew a link this week between falling terms of trade and a lower dollar but omitted a number of factors that could potentially push it higher by Stephen Koukoulas 7 16am November 01 49 comments Budget complaints bark up the wrong tree Any monkey with an excel spreadsheet can deliver a budget surplus We must measure economic performance against GDP inflation and unemployment not debt interest rates or the dollar by Stephen Koukoulas 7 10am October 31 68 comments Don t go slow Joe cut now If Joe Hockey can cut spending by just 1 per cent the country would save 4 billion Let s hope he swings the axe on unnecessary expenditure of all kinds by Stephen Koukoulas 7 17am October 30 28 comments The topsy turvy approach to climate change The Direct Action climate change strategy unusually uses payments as an incentive not to pollute What if that theory were applied to other problems by Stephen Koukoulas 7 11am October 29 60 comments Glenn Stevens winning roast dinner A mixed bag of inflation evens out to another win for the Reserve Bank Wages look to be rising in real terms this year and many common items are being priced lower by Stephen Koukoulas 7 14am October 28 24 comments The trouble with bolstering the RBA s reserves Handing 8 8 billion to boost the RBA s coffers will cost taxpayers 350 million a year in interest It is completely unnecessary by Stephen Koukoulas 7 07am October 25 64 comments Hurry up Hockey and hold the riesling A quarter of the Abbott government s first term will be spent waiting for the budget and government spending audit Surely some excesses can be cut sooner by Stephen Koukoulas 7 18am October 24 28 comments A dicey jobs print for the Fed This morning s US data release shows the employment rate is the lowest it s been since 2008 despite another 148 000 jobs created in September It s easy to see why monetary

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/stephen-koukoulas_0 (2014-01-12)
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  • Deborah Ralston | Business Spectator
    real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Deborah Ralston A triple threat for retiree super The post retirement phase was largely overlooked in development of Australia s current super system Industry and government must quickly step up to fix this dangerous oversight by Deborah Ralston 4 09pm October 22 18 comments Locked out of lending While the debate over banking competitions rages incoming consumer protection legislation threatens to dramatically reduce the availability of credit to some borrowers particularly retirees and the self employed by Deborah Ralston 6 31am December 14 2 comments Banking s quick draw dilemma If the government is serious about improving competition in the banking sector it needs to realise that removing exit fees will not solve the problem especially when the banking playing field is not level by Deborah Ralston 2 37pm November 15 2 comments SGX ASX will be the making of our hub Our financial sector s regional engagement thus far been lax and far from killing our financial hub aspirations the ASX SGX deal has the potential to deliver Australia a major role in Asian financial markets by Deborah Ralston 6 26am October 29 3 comments Authorising inequality The RBA s reforms on banks ATM charges are a further blow to regional banks which have already been left out in the cold with the government s bank guarantee by Deborah Ralston 7 48am July 02 A triple threat for retiree super The post retirement phase was largely overlooked in development of Australia s current super system Industry and government must quickly step up to fix this dangerous oversight by Deborah Ralston 4 09pm October 22 18 comments Locked out of lending While the debate over banking competitions rages incoming consumer protection legislation threatens to dramatically reduce the availability of credit to some borrowers particularly retirees and the self employed by Deborah Ralston 6 31am December 14 2 comments Banking s quick draw dilemma If the government

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/deborah-ralston (2014-01-12)
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  • Japan's wrinkles are on our horizon | Business Spectator
    up against its debt ceiling Many politicians in Washington evidently think that once the ratio of debt to gross domestic product nears 100 per cent Armageddon beckons They should visit Japan where that ratio is now more than 230 per cent and the country is still orderly and functioning But Japan is very vulnerable to any rise in global interest rates Even in the current climate of ultra low rates interest on the debt consumes about 25 per cent of Japan s national budget The much touted radical economic experiment of Abenomics is in part a reaction to debt Shinzo Abe Japan s prime minister aims to increase inflation to about 2 per cent in the hope that the subsequent economic growth will generate the revenue required to pay increasing social costs and reduce the debt to GDP ratio Radical open collared economists now prowl the previously sedate halls of the Bank of Japan The near doubling of the money supply involved in Abenomics makes the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank look positively cautious by comparison Economists are agog at the boldness of the Japanese experiment Yet even supporters of Abenomics acknowledge that there are big gambles involved in particular the risks of capital flight market panics and ultimately excessive inflation Radical measures of some sort were certainly necessary It is now more than 20 years since Japan s property and stock bubble burst and the country s economy has never really regained its mojo Instead the country has found that measures taken to prop up the system such as ultra low interest rates created their own problems It was Japan that introduced the world to the zombie bank and now similar zombies are proliferating in Europe Abe s radicalism is not driven solely by domestic economics Japan has also been jolted into action by the perception of a growing threat from China The Chinese economy surpassed Japan s in size in 2011 the gap is widening with each passing year China will soon have its own problem with ageing as a result of its one child policy But Japanese strategists point out that China s annual military spending is now three to four times that of Japan The two countries are engaged in dangerous military jostling as they pursue a territorial dispute over some barren rocks in the East China Sea While the west still debates whether the rise of China is threatening there is no longer a debate in Japan where national alarm is palpable The challenges facing Japan are so complicated and varied that it is impossible to leave the country with a simple set of lessons The determination to maintain social solidarity and to respect promises made to its citizens is admirable But Japan has also paid a price for emphasising social harmony Protecting the jobs of the old has restricted opportunities for the young 38 per cent of whom are now in precarious work A refusal to countenance mass immigration has also

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/15/asian-economy/japans-wrinkles-are-our-horizon (2014-01-12)
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  • Gideon Rachman - Financial Times | Business Spectator
    tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Gideon Rachman Financial Times Japan s wrinkles are on our horizon Japan s aging population lack of job security national security and staggering debt to GDP ratio deserve a watchful eye as they could soon face the west by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 8 12am October 15 3 comments Merkel s Germany is becoming Merkel s Europe Angela Merkel has a misunderstood vision for Europe And it will surprise those who think her new approach to the union is only temporary crisis relief by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 7 06am September 24 5 comments Obama and Xi must halt the rise of a risky rivalry The dance between Barack Obama and Xi Jinping at this week s US China summit will seek to contain real hazards behind their countries mutual suspicion by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 7 24am June 04 3 comments North Korea tests the limits of a MAD world Uncertainty over the intentions of North Korea s leadership means the rationale of mutually assured destruction may not apply and the greatest opportunity for peace will come from change within the rogue state by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 11 21am April 02 2 comments Crisis and the making of a German Europe As stakes rise Berlin can no longer be shy about asserting its interests Meanwhile the countries that recently balanced German power are becoming weaker by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 8 22am March 27 2 comments Be ready for a North Korean end game China and the US have always been at loggerheads over North Korea but as their separate strategies fail to contain the rogue state s growing nuclear threat they may be forced to form an unlikely alliance by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 2 20pm March 12 2 comments Japan s wrinkles are on our horizon Japan s aging population lack of job security national security and staggering debt to GDP ratio deserve a watchful eye as they could soon face the west by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 8 12am October 15 3 comments Merkel s Germany is becoming Merkel s Europe Angela Merkel has a misunderstood vision for Europe And it will surprise those who think her new approach to the union is only temporary crisis relief by Gideon Rachman Financial Times 7 06am September 24 5 comments

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/gideon-rachman-financial-times-1 (2014-01-12)
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