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  • Productivity is biggest challenge: NSW | Business Spectator
    9 47 AM 1 Politics National Affairs Economy Productivity O Farrell focused on infrastructure jobs as premiers arrive at COAG meeting You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP NSW Premier Barry O Farrell has nominated productivity concerns and infrastructure funding as his priorities for a meeting of the country s leaders Prime Minister Tony Abbott is hosting his first Council of Australian Governments gathering in Canberra on Friday The meeting is being held against the backdrop of a decision by US car giant General Motors to cease manufacturing in Australia by 2017 Productivity and the need to improve productivity is the single greatest challenge this country faces Mr O Farrell told reporters Lack of productivity risked the jobs across the country and state and federal government has to tackle the issue he said Mr O Farrell said it was important that Australian products were not priced out of global markets The premier said he was always after more Commonwealth funding for infrastructure in NSW and ensuring federal government red tape didn t get in the way of state projects Premier of Western Australia Colin Barnett agreed infrastructure funding would be an issue for the meeting along with the Abbott government s planned parental leave scheme And I m sure there s going to be some discussion about the car industry he told reporters Mr Barnett said there was no point blaming governments workers unions the mining industry or the high dollar for the industry s predicament What we are seeing is significant structural change in the Australian economy The discussion should be where to from here and pursue areas where Australia had a clear natural advantage such as minerals and gas processing Victorian Premier Denis Napthine said his priority was the Commonwealth s response to the Holden decision I ll be fighting hard for an assistance package particularly for the affected workers and their families he told reporters A substantial transformation package was needed for Victoria to grow new job opportunities Mr Napthine rejected reports car maker Toyota had asked his government for more taxpayer assistance Tasmanian Premier Lara Giddings is concerned about some of the items listed for discussion including the national disability insurance scheme the GST and the national broadband network It was too early to talk about the future of the NDIS because trial launch sites had been operating for only about four months she said It needs to have at least 12 months before we get a firm idea as to how that model is working for Tasmanians she told reporters adding those benefiting from the scheme were loving it Queensland Premier Campbell Newman

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/13/national-affairs/productivity-biggest-challenge-nsw (2014-01-12)
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  • Aust competitiveness lags: Shell | Business Spectator
    across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Aust competitiveness lags Shell 28 Nov 2013 4 55 AM 3 Politics Industries Insurance Resources and Energy Economy Australian News Productivity Shell exec warns it sees no sign of easing construction cost pressures You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password A senior Royal Dutch Shell executive has issued a stinging criticism of Australia s competitiveness warning that the company has seen little sign of an effort to easing Australian cost pressures in response to an increase in delayed or shelved LNG projects according to The Australian Shell projects and technology director Matthias Bichsel is in Australia along with Shell s global chairman Jorma Ollia to discuss the issue of cost pressures and regulations with Australian officials Costs in terms of productivity labour availability these are clearly issues that persist that is one of the reasons we are here Mr Bischel told The Australian Mr Bischel said one step the Abbott government could take would be reduce the regulatory burden for new projects which had been previously promised We heard from a bunch of ambassadors today and one said that the cost to do a government tender here can be three times as high as the rest of the world he told The Australian That s the area where there are opportunities to simplify take costs out and speed up the process Print this page Related articles 13 Jan Iran nuke deal to take effect 13 Jan Govt interest bills surging report 13 Jan Abbott to pursue red tape cuts 13 Jan Palmer wants to repeal Newman laws 12 Jan Israel s Sharon dead at 85 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Don Gilbert Thu 2013 11 28 08 59 Dear Shell and some of your Oil mates Every time I see a Double B truck up someone s arse with a mass of 3 000 000 kgm s PLUS I think I have the maths

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/28/politics/aust-competitiveness-lags-shell (2014-01-12)
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  • Regulations come under fire | Business Spectator
    energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Regulations come under fire 28 Nov 2013 4 03 AM Economy Productivity Transfield chair says Aust regulators too often seek to replicate US EU You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The impact of regulatory hurdles on Australian businesses has come under fire from Transfield chairman and Wesfarmers director Diane Smith Gander who has joined calls for a review of the regulatory system according to The Australian Specifically Ms Smith Gander said Australian regulators too often seek to replicate systems in other much larger economies such as the European Union or the United States rather than pursuing a system tailored to Australia s size and make up I find it very disappointing that regulators in this nation seem to think that we should try to regulate ourselves as if we re the United States or the European Economic Union she told The Australian We should regulate ourselves recognising the size of our nation we have got the same number of people as Shanghai City about the same number of the state of Texas so we should have world class regulators that are about helping the standard of living to stay high in this country not just layering in regulation costs Her criticism comes in the wake of comments by Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce calling for a review of regulations in the aviation industry while the latest Director Sentiment Index from the Australian Institute of Company Directors reported that more than 60 per cent of directors believe the level of red tape and the time spent by boards on regulatory compliance had increased during the previous 12 months Ms Smith Gander

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/28/productivity/regulations-come-under-fire (2014-01-12)
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  • Low productivity worries firms: poll | Business Spectator
    lift managers leadership motivational and negotiating skills to bring the best out of employees This is a board and management problem at least as much as it s a worker union problem One simple example is that I have had many new MBA grads working for me in operational roles who acted more like accountants than leaders and managers They can analyse the hell out of a spreadsheet but often struggle to bring the best out of their staff Conversely many companies are reluctant to invest in training for Foremen and Leading Hands to develop their communication planning and training skills to enable them to guide factory staff to excellent performance Also unions need to train organisers to be able to assist with implementing new ideas so that employees arebenefit but the companies still achieve objectives Of course there are many examples of operational excellence in Australia but there is much to be done at every level It s simply not good enough to just politicise this issue and use it as a union bashing excuse richard mcnaught Wed 2013 11 27 11 29 Spot on Anthony Management is abysmal one in one hundred would be exceptional George Ossolinski Wed 2013 11 27 11 32 There is no point in trying to say that the unions are not to blame for low productivity Many industries are closing down in Australia or move overseas If it was management problems with Australian managers those companies would simply bring in managers from overseas The problem is the lack of productivity of the workforce because outside forces the unions control the workforce Government red and green tape is also outside the management control and is much more expensive in Australia than overseas Anthony Element Wed 2013 11 27 11 59 George how can that be true when only around 20 of Australia s private sector is unionised Also your point about bringing in managers from overseas is wrong because often the decision to bring in foreign managers would have to be made by Australian managers who are unable to see themselves as part of the problem Surveys have shown that only a tiny fraction of Australian managers have actually had any management training and even less have had leadership training Most of those who have had leadership training are like me ex military but we re relatively few and far between Rob Hunter Wed 2013 11 27 13 36 If you have good managers who are doing their jobs properly including looking after the workers the workforce will not feel the need to be unionised and will bend over backwards to do the right thing for the company If companies want to lift their productivity one thing they can do is simply ask the workforce who will usually know how improvements can be made because guess what They are the ones working at the coal face They are the ones who have the hands on experience This also gives workers a sense of ownership

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/27/productivity/low-productivity-worries-firms-poll (2014-01-12)
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  • Govt downplays pension talk | Business Spectator
    change should only be considered when we have eliminated age discrimination from the workplace she said adding that about two million Australians over 55 were willing to work but could not find employment Australian Council of Trade Unions president Ged Kearney said if the government wanted to reduce budget pressures as the population aged it should strengthen the superannuation system A strong superannuation system lets ordinary workers retire with security and quality of life and takes pressure off the pension system The Australian Greens said the government should be ensuring big business and the mining sector were paying their fair share to help care for all Australians as they aged Raising the pension age again without proper examination would be a knee jerk reaction Greens Senator Rachel Siewert said But business believes the commission s proposal is a sensible response to increased life expectancies As major contributors to taxation revenue businesses have an interest in containing the growth of government spending associated with the ageing population Australian Industry Group chief executive Innes Willox said The commission also proposed an equity release scheme for older Australians who own their own homes to help pay for health and aged care services The scheme would mean those who own their homes contribute half of the annual real increased house value to the government which would help cut government spending by about 30 per cent Retirement Living Council executive director Mary Wood said the recommendation had significant merit as accommodation requirements changed with age Downsizing to retirement villages in particular should be encouraged not penalised she said Print this page Related articles 18 Dec Hockey defends MYEFO forecasts 17 Dec Joe needs a revenue Hockey stick 17 Dec ALP warns of more cuts business urges reform 17 Dec Govt confirms car funding cuts 17 Dec Shorten urges govt on MYEFO motor support More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy R Ambrose Raven Sat 2013 11 23 11 00 While politicians froth much about the cost of the ageing of the population cost not the health of the elderly being the issue to them their hypocrisy is demonstrated by the changes they legislate that advantage the ageing wealthy at the expense of the working generation and the needy In all contemporary matters economic our ruling class has but one aim to preserve the plunder acquired during the post 1980 debt driven asset price bubble that it created Austerity to cut the proportion of national income going to the non filthy rich thus goes hand in hand with Printing Money intended to keep asset prices as high as possible for as long as possible the non filthy rich to bear all the costs when it has to end AGW denialists deny Devastating Climate Change Cost of ageing alarmists in contrast seek to magnify the cost of ageing by arguing that the problem is so big that we simply can t provide they serve the Rabid Right ideological agenda of either working the lazy swine till they die or looting their assets Shifting towards user pays health care and pensions a shift that has already begun via private health insurance and superannuation will cost more and provide less than government doing so directly Flogging out has the limitless greed of the profit seekers to feed as is shown by the unlimited cost of private health insurance and private superannuation subsidies Demographic changes do not deserve the cost of ageing hysteria that they ve received Cost of ageing alarmists take care not to mention that the oldest people tend to be the richest tend to use fewer resources generally live and die at home and often support younger family members Ageing does not pose any particularly severe costs Spending on aged care is projected to grow from 0 8 of GDP to 1 8 in the same period Since those numbers seem very moderate the cost of ageing alarmists frighten us by adding but by 2050 the cost of providing pensions aged care services and health care will be an extra 60 billion a year in today s dollars more than three times what we currently spend on the Family Tax Benefit No don t leave the age pension at 65 reduce it to 60 ross condon Sat 2013 11 23 15 00 Raising the pension age to 70 is the most degrading cop out that you can ever imagine obviously thought up by some high flying office type worker beurocrat that does not know what a real days physical work is let alone for 50 years of your life How can the productivity commission expect a person that works manual labour or even shift worker to do this for 50 years they are nieve to the outside world There are a whole range of issues with this eg Do you really expect a 68 year old to get up a ladder on the roof or a sparky to crawl through your hot roof to repair your wiring or dig trenches and the list goes on The employer will expect can t discriminate this and if you can t he will either degrade you by sweeping floors or like and get younger people to do it or alternately get ride of you because you can t tow the line you are to slow I need productivity which means money A new door will open in regards to O H S issues here This will make Australia the first country in the developed world to work people till they die at work as a retirement age of 70 I have been a shift worker for 40 years and am 60 years old and I am starting to have health problems now research what shift work does to you for that long But what beurocrat or politician cares if you

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/23/federal-budget/govt-downplays-pension-talk (2014-01-12)
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  • Arrow LNG project put on notice | Business Spectator
    Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Arrow LNG project put on notice 15 Nov 2013 6 35 AM Industries Infrastructure Resources and Energy Economy Productivity Shell PetroChina order Arrow managers to reign in project costs You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The owners of the Arrow coal seam gas project in Queensland have ordered the project s team to tighten its costs or Arrow will not go ahead according to The Australian The ultimatum from Royal Dutch Shell and PetroChina to the project s team casts further uncertainty on the outlook for Australia s liquefied natural gas LNG outlook The Arrow team has been told by Shell and PetroChina that the project s cost structure does not compare well with other potential investment opportunities Staff have been advised that we are still looking for more value in the project including collaboration in order to offer shareholders Shell and PetroChina a more competitive environment an Arrow spokesman said according to The Australian Arrow has previously stated that it is results and value focused and not schedule driven Print this page Related articles 13 Jan BHP faces buyback pressure 13 Jan Indonesia ban no issue Palmer 10 Jan OM Holdings CEO resigns 10 Jan Korea China jostle for Aust resources

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/15/resources-and-energy/arrow-lng-project-put-notice-0 (2014-01-12)
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  • Directors want litigation clampdown | Business Spectator
    a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password By a staff reporter Australia s top company directors have called on the government to crack down on litigation funders who they accuse of encouraging a proliferation of pricey class actions against major corporates according to The Australian The newspaper citing a submission to the Productivity Commission by the Australian Institute of Company Directors AICD says the group also requested an investigation into whether this apparent flurry of legal activity was a drain on the economy In the submission the AICD said many class actions were being driven by litigation funders leaving companies facing potentially significant costs and disruption The group called for stricter controls on law firms that set up companies to finance class actions including subjecting them to capital adequacy requirements to ensure they can cover costs if they lose a case Print this page Related articles 13 Jan Telstra may sell Sensis for 3bn 13 Jan BHP faces buyback pressure 13 Jan Indonesia ban no issue Palmer 13 Jan Singh behind key KKR deal 13 Jan Financial Index to buy Centric Wealth for 130m More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Don Gilbert Tue 2013 11 12 07 41 Absolutely not It is the behaviour of the company directors CEOs Executive Officers and its interaction with the community the investment community that may be called into question CBA ANZ Bank of Qld and their behaviour in Townsville Centro and if I remember correctly their accountants and their behaviour towards their investors AND THEIR STAFF i e issuance of shares as part of salary packages i e spending spree in USA and misleading shareholders GPT and their spending spree Westpoint etc etc What about litigation funding and Thalidomide for that young woman well she is not young anymore she is my age I have the right to a small claim for the damage two tablets did to me This is a valid way to bring the Sacred Cows sitting in their Ivory Towers breathing refined oxygen to account when they ought to know and do know you bunch of bloody pretenders about exactly what is going on at Ground Zero It balances the position of so called power and for ordinary people to get even So no way should there be any lessening of class actions and or the potential for class actions Edward Lunney Tue 2013 11 12 11 28 I agree with other comments that employees should not be prevented from seking legal assistance when they have a valid claim against an employer for say an injury sustained at work due to unsafe work conditions or practices Or sexual harrassment and say wrongfull pay or wrongful dismissal and any

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/12/industries/directors-want-litigation-clampdown (2014-01-12)
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  • CFMEU faces watchdog probe | Business Spectator
    success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu CFMEU faces watchdog probe 7 Nov 2013 4 47 AM 2 Industries Construction and Engineering Economy Productivity Building watchdog to probe intimidation claims at Lend Lease sites You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The federal government s Fair Work Building Industry Inspectorate has said it will investigate union officials accused of attempting to intimidate a builder into employing full time non working union shop stewards on four project sites according to The Australian The officials from the Construction Forestry Mining and Energy Union CFMEU are accused of arriving at four Lend Lease projects in Adelaide without right of entry permits in a co ordinated effort to pressure the company to hire the shop stewards They also reportedly sought to intimidate the builder into flying the CFMEU flag from crane hooks The union allegedly threatened to come back and shut down the site if the flag was not flown according to The Australian The union has reportedly conceded the right of entry breaches but denied attempting to threaten a Lend Lease manager Print this page Related articles 10 Jan New home sales lift in November 09 Jan Building approvals fall in November 08 Jan Fair Work Commission warns unions 08 Jan Residential construction lifts in December 07 Jan Boart Longyear appoints new CFO More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy rodney ludlow Thu 2013 11 07 08 15 Lock these thugs up R Ambrose

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/7/construction-and-engineering/cfmeu-faces-watchdog-probe (2014-01-12)
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