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  • Brett Cole | Business Spectator
    Interim financing deal for Mirabela Nickel Unsecured Mirabela creditors may agree to provide short term financing to the distressed nickel miner as soon as Friday by Brett Cole 9 30am December 19 iBuy seeks to raise 37 million in IPO The new e commerce business is scheduled to begin trading on the ASX on Friday by Brett Cole 1 40pm December 18 Bega may sell WCB stake to Saputo The dairy company stands to gain significantly by offloading its stake in the takeover target Other bidders may follow sparking a ramp up in M A activity in the sector by Brett Cole 11 07am December 18 1 comment IFM invests US 1 3 bln in LNG project The Melbourne based fund manager will take a majority stake in a proposed natural gas liquefaction and LNG loading facility in Texas by Brett Cole 4 29pm December 17 Murray Goulburn hints at improved Warrnambool bid The dairy cooperative wants to claim as much as 1 31 per share in special dividends on top of its 9 50 a share offer for Warrnambool by Brett Cole 10 20am December 17 Speed MnA dating Wesfarmers and IAG The 1 84 billion sale of Wesfarmers insurance unit to Insurance Australia Group was done in four weeks by Brett Cole 5 37pm December 16 IPO market set to sizzle in 2014 As much as 8 billion worth of IPOs may hit the ASX in the first half of 2014 by Brett Cole 3 06pm December 16 Qld seeks advisers on power port assets The state government will select investment banks and legal firms to conduct scoping studies for its electricity and port assets by Brett Cole 5 34pm December 13 First bids for Qld Motorways due in January The winner of the auction of 62 kms of roads and bridges will probably be announced in April by Brett Cole 4 55pm December 13 2 comments ASX BookBuild to launch its first IPO A Chinese owned coal explorer plans to raise as much as 125 million in the first IPO using the ASX BookBuild system by Brett Cole 1 38pm December 13 IBA creates 70 million indigenous REIT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island communities have as much as 40 billion to invest says IBA s chief executive by Brett Cole 6 20pm December 12 Page 2 Chinese buyers contemplating Warrnambool bid China Investment Corp and a Chinese food company may team up to launch a Warrnambool takeover offer by Brett Cole 12 54am December 27 7 comments Chinese firm raises part of 125m IPO via ASX system Chinese owned U D Coal placed remaining shares in the IPO with investors via a traditional placement by Brett Cole 4 39pm December 23 Northern Star Resources seeks more deals The gold miner s managing director says the world s major gold producers are selling their smaller mines giving Northern Star an opportunity to acquire more assets by Brett Cole 3 28pm December 23 Warrnambool says Saputo can win control

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/brett-cole?page=1 (2014-01-12)
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  • Brett Cole | Business Spectator
    January 07 2 comments Deutsche Bank wins NAB ADR contract The German bank is beefing up its transaction banking services in an effort to win more business by Brett Cole 4 54pm January 06 United Dairy seeks to sell a stake The country s biggest privately owned milk supplier wants to sell a stake to an Australian investor by Brett Cole 2 00pm January 06 4 comments Saputo may extend Warrnambool deadline The Canadian dairy giant will resume talks with key Warrnambool shareholders as it debates whether to close its takeover offer Friday by Brett Cole 12 02am January 06 1 comment Keybridge mulling buyback to repel Oceania The investment company subject to a takeover offer from rival Oceania is considering a full range of capital management options by Brett Cole 1 45pm January 03 Westpac says Lloyds deal progressing well The bank says its acquisition of Lloyds Australian businesses closed December 31 as scheduled by Brett Cole 2 57pm January 02 Potential bidders for Gunns get more time font color red DataRoom font Deadline for expressions of interest in bankrupt timber company extended assets valued at 795 9m by Brett Cole 8 41am January 02 1 comment Macquarie tops 2013 IPO league table The homegrown investment bank beat UBS to claim the number one status as the country s leading IPO underwriter by Brett Cole 3 07pm December 31 UBS tops Australian M A in 2013 The Zurich based investment bank beat rivals Goldman Sachs and Macquarie for the top spot according to Bloomberg data by Brett Cole 12 37pm December 31 Mirabela Nickel secures 50 million loan A new loan from its noteholders will allow the struggling nickel miner to continue operating with discussions now centring on a US100 million equity offering by Brett Cole 2 07pm December 30 JP Morgan Lazard to assess Qld infrastructure assets State govt hires firms for scoping studies to prepare two port assets for potential sale by Brett Cole 11 53am December 30 Chinese buyers circle United Dairy Power Bright Food Group may be leading contender to acquire privately owned Victorian milk supplier by Brett Cole 4 05pm December 27 16 comments Queensland Motorways bids due Feb 7 QIC hopes to close the sale of Queensland Motorways by the end of April by Brett Cole 2 23am December 27 Page 1 Singh behind key KKR deal Jeff Singh s Chase Corporate Advisory helped bring in KKR to secure the 130 million takeover of Centric Wealth by Brett Cole 1 09am January 13 1 comment Financial Index to buy Centric Wealth for 130m After the acquisition closes New York based KKR will take one third stake in Financial Index by Brett Cole 12 09am January 13 1 comment Saputo pushes for Bega s Warrnambool stake The Canadian dairy company is lobbying Bega in an effort to win its 19 per cent stake in Warrnambool by Brett Cole 12 05pm January 10 1 comment Saputo tipped to extend Warrnambool offer The Canadian company risks

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/brett-cole?destination=taxonomy/term/126481 (2014-01-12)
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  • China banks on SMEs for growth | Business Spectator
    with the intent of shifting from dominance on state owned business to reliance on small and medium enterprises I had such a lesson in Macau last week attending the International Small Business Pan Asia Congress Speakers from Hong Kong Macau Taiwan Korea Japan Indonesia and Malaysia discussed how their region under the shadow of the colossus of China is surging economically dominating global growth now and set to do so throughout this Century Li Zhi Bin chairman of the China Association of Small and Medium Enterprises brought to the forefront the scale of this economic surge describing in some detail the significance of the Chinese Communist Party s recent Congress and the Plenary Session held last month He described the series of announcements and papers from these peak CCP events as being the most significant in 35 years since that of the opening up of China by Deng Xiaoping The aim of the CCP is for China to be a fully fledged market economy by 2050 being wealthy democratic and socialist While wealthy and socialist may be easy concepts for China to grasp we don t yet know what the idea of democratic means within the framework of CCP thinking The CCP has accepted that the dominance of the government sector and government commercial enterprises is interfering in its goal of a market economy and that it is suppressing innovation One of the six pillars of this CCP reform program is to rebalance government with the market in China Zhi Bin said This means small and medium enterprises SMEs will be put at the centre of economic activity SMEs make up more than 90 per cent of private companies in China Zhi Bin said These 35 million registered businesses contribute 60 per cent of GDP 50 per cent of tax revenue hold 65 per cent of patents and produce 80 per cent of all new products And they are recognised as the most significant of social stablisers because they employ 80 per cent of the workforce A little while ago an associate of mine who has more than 30 years of doing continuous business in China made an important observation he said that the CCP knows its hold on power is dependent on delivering continuous economic growth and prosperity in China If that s so the new CCP economic reform program can be understood within a CCP self interested political motivation Big business particularly government owned and controlled business concentrates wealth Small business is both the major driver of economic growth and broad wealth distribution in any society Conceptually the CCP must both enable economic growth and ensure wealth is spread throughout the Chinese population Enabling small business is becoming critical to the CCP This message seemed to come through by implication in Zhi Bin s comments SMEs are key to the rebalancing of the private sector with state owned enterprises he said Reforms are to proceed in areas of legal treatment access to resources particularly finance approvals processes and

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/5/china/china-banks-smes-growth (2014-01-12)
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  • Freelance workers: hits and myths | Business Spectator
    from contractors that any business would want to grab These are people who display high levels of happiness and satisfaction in their work with strong commitment to their clients Over 80 per cent of respondents report that they are proud of the work they do feel happy when working intensely are enthusiastic about their job and immersed in their work Ninety eight per cent say they can usually handle whatever comes their way The same number usually find several solutions when confronted with a problem and they meet the goals they set for themselves in their work Two thirds experience a sense of commitment to their client A similar proportion of respondents feel their client supports and cares about them and provides help when they have a problem The sense of professionalism shows through in their attitudes to meeting work and project goals delivering prompt service They are trustworthy and have their clients interests at heart Over 97 per cent rate themselves performing on these attributes What comes through is quite a different picture to what I d seen in the self analysis at the workshops I ve attended First the common perception that contractors are not committed to their client s and less bonded appears to be quite misplaced The commitment is in fact high It s just that the commitment doesn t come from some sense of legal tie through employment to the firm Rather the contractor s or IPro s focus is on the firm as their client Perhaps this enables an even a stronger commitment than that given by employees but it s an unrecognised commitment Admittedly I don t have comparative data on employee attitudes with a similar white collar profile But any management concerns about contractor commitment should be put to one side Maybe this is so because HR managers and others in companies seem to be doing a pretty good job of looking after the contractors There seems to be room for improvement But there s a probable link between contractor commitment and productivity and the willingness of clients to look after contractors In fact it s quite a positive picture In my experience as a self employed consultant contractor with my clients the look after means the client responding to the issues I have that enable me to do my work If issues are left unaddressed I m unable to do my work and my responsiveness drops off markedly In theory the idea of firms being made up of contractors providing services are alien to the formal ideas and approaches taught to and held by management The Ipro Index shows it s not alien in practice Ken Phillips is executive director of Independent Contractors Australia and author of Independence and the Death of Employment Print this page More from Ken Phillips 10 Jan Harnessing the power of the one man brand 05 Dec China banks on SMEs for growth 19 Nov Australia got caught out by Freelancer com 20 Sep Caution will reign in the Abbott government 25 Jun Unions can t paint over a construction revolution Related articles 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Google s obey or perish rules of the internet 06 Jan Where the new jobs are 20 Dec iBuy shares rise on debut 20 Dec Roy Hill secures US700m loan More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy richard mcnaught Fri 2013 11 29 10 07 As has been stated by quite a few comments in these pages it matters not who employs the worker on the site If the management cannot manage the situation then the management are incompetent not the worker I would challenge anyone to prove to me that there is anymore than one competent manager in one hundred in Australian businesses Most are a waste of oxygen A classic I worked at one minesite in WA When you reported problems to the manager his comment was Care factor Zero DOUGLAS lastName Fri 2013 11 29 11 26 And that richard is an example of the difference between employer employee and employer contractor relationships Nick Nikov Fri 2013 11 29 11 22 Given that contractors make up nearly a quarter of the workforce in large organisation is it feasible to have even a larger number I suspect that contracting is not for everyone and also not for the whole of one s working life Graham Plowman Fri 2013 11 29 12 45 I strongly agree with Ken s analysis My own experience has been that contractors often have a stronger relationship with their clients than permies do Contractors are generally better motivated I would suggest it probably has something to do with the more business like nature of the relationship and the fact that they have to be very professional in order to stay in business Given the contractual relationships companies have with contractors when is the ATO going to grow up and start treating contractors as indpendent businesses instead of ignoring their legal company structures and treating them as employees of their clients for taxation purposes And when is the ATO going to stop this farce of classifying anyone who works outside the union employee straightjacket as personal services In my opinion this whole PSI tax legislation was deliberately aimed at professional people who don t work in the old model It is unfair and should be scrapped Terry MULLIGAN Fri 2013 11 29 14 13 A Contractor is like a movie star Only as good as the last show As such the dedication loyalty and commitment to an employer and job outcome is so often far better than is offered by full time employees Employees expect to be Managed and then complain if that management is too strong or too weak for them Explained by HR Professionals as the requirement

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/29/information-technology/freelance-workers-hits-and-myths (2014-01-12)
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  • Paralysed in a tax office trap | Business Spectator
    And it s an offence to use a business name that isn t registered Further if you operate a business without an ABN anyone paying you is required to withhold 46 5 per cent of your payment and send this to the ATO No one can operate a small business under this cash denying arrangement In addition without an ABN you ll find it impossible to register under state workers compensation schemes and to receive other regulatory registrations and approvals Also submitting tenders for government or private sector work become impossible without an ABN By controlling to whom the ATO allocates ABNs the government has massive big brother sister type master control of the make up and structure of the Australian workforce and business The works against the original intent of the ABN system which was to give the ATO significant auditing capacity to detect non declaration of incomes When the Australian Business Number system was established around 2000 the process intentionally gave an ABN to everyone who applied including individuals The reasoning was that this supported tax compliance and auditing The ATO can and does cross reference ABNs to bank account details and so on This huge trawling of data enables or should enable the ATO to check claimed business income against actual bank deposits and other transactions Over about the last few years this started to change The ATO began to stop allocating ABNs to individuals If someone s a labourer for example they now automatically have their ABN application rejected ABN applications can be done online through an ATO decision making tool The tool takes applicants through a series of questions to determine if the individual is an employee or contractor As an applicant steps through questions different answers trigger alternative additional questions Eventually the tool will declare the applicant either an employee or contractor If the declaration is employee an ABN application is rejected More recently the ATO tool appears to have undergone fine twigging It s not noticeable to the casual observer but others familiar with the tool differences are noticeable Meanwhile people applying as individuals are having difficulty obtaining an ABN At Independent Contractors Australia we ve been receiving a steady stream of information and complaints for around 9 months People who want an ABN are being told no on the basis of allegedly being an employee according to the ATO In my view the legal basis for the ATO setting itself up as a God like online determiner of an individual s employment status is highly questionable The ABN legislation is clear that main objective of the ABN is to enable businesses to interact with the ATO for taxation purposes The Act s objectives do not include that an ABN is a determiner of employment or contractor status It s perhaps arguable that the way the ATO currently behaves is beyond its legislative authority On a practical level the ATO is likely contributing to a growth of the black cash economy and tax compliance headaches The ATO automatically gives an ABN to individuals applying under a company partnership or trust structure Yet the ATO has tax compliance problems stopping illegal income splitting and tax avoidance with small companies and trusts And imagine the reaction of people who have their ABN application rejected They either set up a sham company structure or operate in the cash economy thus more easily avoid declaring their income On every measure the denial of ABNs works against the social and economic responsibilities of the ATO Yet why is this happening Look back to the objectives of the Australian union movement Denying ABNs is a most effective way of using the power of government to suppress independent contracting Ken Phillips is executive director of Independent Contractors Australia and author of Independence and the Death of Employment Print this page More from Ken Phillips 10 Jan Harnessing the power of the one man brand 05 Dec China banks on SMEs for growth 29 Nov Freelance workers hits and myths 19 Nov Australia got caught out by Freelancer com 20 Sep Caution will reign in the Abbott government Related articles 10 Jan Harnessing the power of the one man brand 06 Jan Govt to tackle franchise imbalance 31 Dec Govt scraps small business tax breaks 31 Dec Abbott must fix small business in 2014 19 Dec Australia s growth is all in the family More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Rau lastname Wed 2013 04 24 09 35 Ken I think the issue really should be about who what is a contractor and gets an ABN and who doesn t As for the on line process I m fine with that so long as it operates transparently against a clear policy is highly reliable and there is some form of review possible at least in limited circumstances I don t follow why the ATO would insist that a labourer must be an employee Many labourers work for an unending sequence of builders say and may do just a day s work and then move on Does the Government hold that such persons must become employees of an intermediate body shopping firm If so they should say that then we can have the substantive debate By the way there is a tricky workers compensation issue with the labourer example I quote the builder cannot get coverage for such a person and the labourers themselves will often not secure their own insurance scott lastName Wed 2013 04 24 13 12 This was discussed 2 yrs ago Ken Henry was an avid supporter of the CFMEU union spelt ACTU push to get rid of as many non workers abn sole traders etc onto wages to build up union membership numbers across the country more union money for more socialist ventures and more taxable

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/4/24/small-business-sme/paralysed-tax-office-trap (2014-01-12)
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  • Riding the tidal wave of self-employment | Business Spectator
    of the US workforce towards people working for themselves To this must be added the almost equal number of people who are self employed employers With those numbers included the total number of self employed Australians comes to 19 per cent and in the US well over 20 per cent The US study also predicts that non employing independent workers will grow to 23 million within five years At that rate total self employment will exceed a quarter of the workforce Technological advancements will further accelerate this growth trend In my last Business Spectator article I predicted that 3D printing would enable people to become solo manufacturing businesses The solo sector s coming 3D attraction March 22 This emerging worker profile is starting to become very big And it s a demographic that doesn t think or behave like traditional employees For example the US survey shows that 86 per cent of self employed workers are satisfied with their work This is much higher than work satisfaction figures for those employed by others Most self employed workers understand and accept the challenges they face regarding uncertain income job security and planning for retirement The bigger majority of self employed workers want to continue working independently While most data shows that they are an older demographic this survey shows 21 per cent are below 32 years of age What s also emerging is that today s self employed are represented strongly in high skill sectors debunking myths about the downtrodden low skilled worker being forced into self employment Of particular interest is that only 12 per cent of independent workers want to grow their business to become an employer This has got to cause a shift in policy approaches to small business Yes small business growth will generate new jobs But the largest percentage of small business growth will be seen in businesses of one without employees There s also a surprise in the gender mix Independent non employing workers are split almost 50 50 male female Most data to date has shown a heavy male dominance But it transpires that the male dominance is with self employed people who employ Only one third of self employed employers are female As with all surveys of the self employed the US report shows that the overwhelming motivation among workers is to be their own boss It s this cultural shift more than anything that s changing the workforce profile And it s something that governments can t and shouldn t try to stop It s a rising tide that needs to be accommodated In Australia the political repositioning is underway The evidence is that Labor Party policy is attempting to stop the change But the Abbott opposition has grasped the shift with considerable depth of understanding It s a key dividing difference between Labor and the Coalition The Coalition s evidence is in Abbott s fair contracts for small business policy This will provide self employed small business people with the same contract protections currently available to consumers The policy will fundamentally alter the contractual relationship between big business and small business providing a levelling of the contractual power relationships Large businesses already find they can t function entirely with employees The skills they need frequently reside with self employed people Just as governments must adapt so too will business strategies need to respond Ken Phillips is executive director of Independent Contractors Australia a nd author of Independence and the Death of Employment Print this page More from Ken Phillips 10 Jan Harnessing the power of the one man brand 05 Dec China banks on SMEs for growth 29 Nov Freelance workers hits and myths 19 Nov Australia got caught out by Freelancer com 20 Sep Caution will reign in the Abbott government Related articles 10 Jan Harnessing the power of the one man brand 06 Jan Govt to tackle franchise imbalance 31 Dec Govt scraps small business tax breaks 31 Dec Abbott must fix small business in 2014 19 Dec Australia s growth is all in the family More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Francois Humbert Thu 2013 04 04 10 43 Interesting to hear about self employment one of the key areas helping to develop a progressive retirement strategy and transmit expertise to younger generations unfortunately our politicians have a brick in the head when it comes to policies for resources development Why on earth do our politicians on both side of politics need to carrying on with means testing income from work on the age pension can they not stick to non work related income for pensions This head in the sand approach only helps to develop the cash in hand economy and certainly is the best way to keep out of the market a lot of expertise that could be passed to next generations Shame on our legalmentarians occupying jobs in parliament better suited to people with the right strategic planning and resource development and economics skills and experience if only our political system could let them be electable rather than preventing them to be in the house Graeme Crawford Thu 2013 04 04 14 11 It is interesting to compare the philosophies of America and Australia and in particular the different policies between the two major parties in Australia As to the latter the Labor party are resisting any movement toward self employment and the independence that goes with it Labor is hanging on to the old vestiges of union control of the work place and compulsory membership The self employed are not interested in carrying that baggage anymore and want to determine their own fortunes That is being rewarded for their own hard work and skill and not that of collective bargaining Obviously the Coalition see that as a given and will take every opportunity

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/4/4/small-business-sme/riding-tidal-wave-self-employment (2014-01-12)
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  • The solo sector's coming 3D attraction | Business Spectator
    resulting in another big surge in self employment This next technological revolution is 3D printing It s here it s now but it s just in its tiny beginning Simple 3D printers are already within a price range for most people at under 1500 Certainly they re a novelty at the moment producing paper toys and the like but could explode in affordable sophistication Think of the following example You purchase a TV sized 3D printer box You re able to search the internet for a vast array of products choose what you want say a set of coffee cups and have them printed and available on the spot in your home Imagine this with clothing and other basic items Three dimensional printing is an extension of technological revolutions of the last couple of decades In this we ve experienced transformations because of instant online transmission of ideas words music images and money Now get set for online transmission via printing of physical objects This is the realisation of more science fiction fantasy The implications cut across every aspect of how societies operate from retailing to transport of goods and more It s another big shift away from an industrial society challenging the very idea of mass production Imagine not just ordering but producing at home your next pair of joggers tailored to your foot s specifications That s not to say that mass production will stop The economies of mass production are likely to beat on price home printed production However what will happen is a surge of diversity and specialisation through the capacity of people to operate their own small and solo businesses Technology has been a big enabler of self employment Self employment took a major jump from the late 1970s from about 7 per cent of the workforce to the early 2000s to about 20 per cent of the workforce A major factor in this increase was the internet and mobile phones The office is now entirely portable enabling people to work from home the beach anywhere This is why the much larger bulk of self employed people 2 1 million in Australia are now professionals architects engineers health professionals marketers and consultants of all sorts The traditional shopkeepers and blue collar tradies remain important but are smaller sub sets What self employed professionals do is produce ideas plans music images concepts and then supply these to clients mostly business to business or sometimes to consumers To date reaching into the consumer market for self employed individuals has been more difficult particularly for physical objects An individual can conceive and create a new niche product That s just the beginning They have to manufacture or find a manufacturer obtain finance to support inventory build up overcome the logistics and cost of distribution and run the risk of insufficient sales to support these costs The barriers to entry are formidable limiting experimentation Three dimensional printing entirely changes the equation for tangible items Individuals will be able to

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/3/22/productivity/solo-sectors-coming-3d-attraction (2014-01-12)
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  • The contract key that could swing small business | Business Spectator
    other party is unfair and breaches the Australian Consumer Law This reference gives a summary of the main unfair contract provisions The original Australian Consumer Law proposal included applying unfair contract protections to small business people as well as consumers It had cross party political support But a powerful big business big union and it s understood public sector bureaucracy lobby combined and fought hard behind the scenes against this In what can only be described as an act of political treachery against small business the federal Labor government excluded small business from the unfair contract protections with the passing of the law in 2010 The impact this has on limiting small business capability and growth has to be understood In conducting their business small business people only have a theoretical access to the rule of commercial law The high expense and complexity of securing commercial contract rights effectively excludes the operation of commercial law when a small business person is confronted by big business or government In this respect small business people are in a very consumer like situation The consequence is that in a vast percentage of commercial transactions small business people cannot trust the legal system to secure their rights This failure of the application of law diminishes commercial trust inhibits and constrains small business activity and reduces the quality and quantity of commercial transactions It s bad for the economy and jobs For this reason the Abbott Coalition commitment to unfair contract protections for small business is a much bigger issue than appears on the surface It will change massively the relationship between small business people and big business and the public sector bureaucracy The fact is that when big business and big government engage in commercial transactions with small business the contracts are routinely and appallingly one sided in giving all power to the larger party Abbott s small business unfair contract protections will force a review and rewrite of such big business big government contracts putting small business people on a more equal footing before the law This will create a stronger small business environment This should directly result in a spur to small business growth as claimed and targeted by the Abbott Coalition It won t happen easily however Several big business lobbyists have gloated to me that they have locked down sufficient influence within the Abbott Coalition to block the small business unfair contract provisions But with the Abbott Coalition going so public with the commitment over the weekend it would appear that small business is seen as more important by the Abbott Coalition Certainly on this issue Labor has made itself the partner of big business against small business This seems strange But within the twisted political deal making culture that Labor has become big union big business deals are more important to Labor than is small business Ken Phillips is executive director of Independent Contractors Australia and author of Independence and the Death of Employment Print this page More from

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/1/29/resources-and-energy/contract-key-could-swing-small-business (2014-01-12)
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