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  • Abbott versus a Madigan-Greens alliance? | Business Spectator
    derive not so much from concern about climate change but rather because he sees it as playing a role in supporting domestic industry and manufacturing The CEFC supports and encourages good local industry development on a responsible basis I want an energy transition that promotes Australian jobs Australian technology and innovation and Australian manufacturing and helps protect the environment to boot practical solutions that achieve such high performance standards take a long time to develop and commercialise 20 years or more They also need ongoing government assistance along the way He then goes on to praise the pin up boy for the Greens and the renewable energy industry I look at some of the cleanest greenest countries on the planet such as Germany which are eminently practical in their approaches to reducing emissions German coalition governments take practical approaches to practical problems They provide direct funding and capital grants to develop and commercialise low emission technologies They assist companies and households to buy low emission technologies They are driving down emissions by using a combination of direct action including capital subsidy programs and regulation as well as taxing pollution These statements are likely to delight the Greens while horrifying many senior policy makers and politicians who are strong believers in free markets The reality is that the Greens membership and supporter base has never really been deeply in love with an emissions trading scheme as the primary policy solution to climate change They like Madigan are suspicious that it will be gamed and corrupted by greedy businesses Instead they prefer more tangible policy instruments linked to things they can touch and feel Feed in tariffs that set prices for electricity from solar and wind minimum standards for the energy efficiency of homes and bans and managed shutdowns of coal fired power stations are more their thing Such policies pose significant risks because they rely heavily on the quality of government officials judgement and foresight While these officials are often just as intelligent as their private sector counterparts everyone makes mistakes and government mistakes are not mopped up quickly by market competition Yet at the same time a large proportion of the population including many who vote for the Coalition are like Senator Madigan They aren t prone to dismiss warnings from highly qualified scientists and respected institutions that global warming is a serious problem But they are deeply worried about the industry dislocation and loss of jobs that comes with transitioning out of fossil fuels For them to be willing to support such a transition they need to be able to clearly see tangible examples on the ground of the industries and jobs what will replace those that are lost They need to see a pathway for how they get from where we are now to where we need to be Saying the market will sort it all out just isn t going to do the job Print this page More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down Related articles 10 Jan Obama orders review of energy infrastructure 10 Jan Senators look to revive US climate debate 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again 10 Jan Why not do it again Abbott 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy debbie glover Wed 2013 12 11 11 53 yes a big surprise from madigan but as you say possibly lines up with his conservative nature abbott morrison hunt and the two bishops are among labor s greatest asset s Jason Dow Wed 2013 12 11 12 27 This makes one wonder on the nature of the conservatism being espoused by the Liberal Party leaders I have always had respect for the traditional conservatives that were slow to change because they recognized the importance on the rate of change for the population to accept new methods of doing things this sounds like this is front and centre for Mr Madigan and it sounds like he is a pragmatist I am interested to see how this roles out over the next few years Brian Handley Wed 2013 12 11 12 30 The genesis of the DLP was its anti Communism crusade so I m surprised John Madigan doesn t appreciate the red over green political climate change before his very eyes but as Helen Keller famously said there are none so blind as those who will not see Amen Comrades Sue Donum Wed 2013 12 11 14 17 It s so true large numbers of people believe greedy businesses will take advantage of a broad based scheme but believe quango direct government finance bodies are pure as the driven snow How quickly we forget VEDC DOUG GAZE Wed 2013 12 11 14 28 But even after June 30 next year if Madigan sides with the progressives against the dinosaurs on the conservative side there are still not enough votes to block abolition of the CEFC are there Stressed Chef Wed 2013 12 11 15 21 Cue whirlwind of political speculation Madigan and Xenophon s positions make it much harder to see the CEFC being abolished In the next Senate if we retain the current WA recount result the Government would need to secure 6 votes to pass repeal from 8 crossbenchers X M s stance means the Government needs 6 of 6 They are guaranteed to get the LDP and Family First They would also need Palmer s 2 direct votes and 1 AMEP vote and the Sports Party Palmer may end up having similar ideas about national development to Madigan and I don t

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/11/policy-politics/abbott-versus-madigan-greens-alliance (2014-01-12)
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  • Will we embrace or reject the network | Business Spectator
    2013 11 58 AM 4 Climate Smart Energy More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down Related articles 08 Jan Labor urges transport rethink 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 08 Jan Australia failing the light bulb test 06 Jan The demand drop mystery explained 20 Dec Biomass plant snubbed for fast track scheme More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Log in to post comments Comments It is great to see CSIRO Submitted by Rick Willoughby on Fri 2013 12 06 19 03 It is great to see CSIRO making informed comment on what has been obvious to me for the last three years Solar panels now cost USD0 45 W to produce I get an average of 1200kWh of solar energy arriving on my roof each day If I completely covered my roof with solar panels I would get around 200kWh of electricity a day available to me My needs average about 6 of that Clearly solar energy is ubiquitous and there for the taking The cost of collecting it can now be paid back in two years at current grid prices The cost of storing it with new LIFePO4 batteries for my overnight use will be paid back in an additional 4 years but payback period is reducing as battery technology improves The cost of inverting it from DC to AC takes another year to payback So a system that is essentially independent of the grid takes 7 years to payback in reduced energy cost at current prices To go off grid the cost of a small diesel as an emergency back up is recovered in three years of connection fee The saving in connection fee reduces the payback period on the rest of the system after year 3 My actual situation is even better because I already have more than 50 of the panels required to go off grid now For many there are substantial tax savings as well because household electricity is paid for with after tax income The sun arrives regularly every day On the worst days it only delivers 30 of the average So it is a little fickle However imagine if rain arrived every day and the worst was 30 of the average Every household could install a small storage tank with pump making them independent of the mains water supply Australia should be leading the world in solar collection and energy storage technology Log in to post comments and second hand batteries Submitted by Ken Mortensen on Fri 2013 12 06 22 36 and second hand batteries from electric vehicles become widely used as on site household electric storage Personal storage

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/6/smart-energy/will-we-embrace-or-reject-network (2014-01-12)
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  • Abbott and Hunt's bureaucratic blindspot | Business Spectator
    would not be prepared to sign abatement purchasing contracts longer than five years Abatement projects often involve large upfront expenditure on equipment that lasts for well beyond a decade If you can t lock in carbon abatement revenue for at least 10 years and ideally 15 to 20 then the banks just aren t interested in coughing up the finance Direct Action is already dead in the water if the government refuses to budge from contracts limited to five years But another issue was whether many big emitters could actually be bothered participating in the ERF auction Some might think of the Direct Action Emission Reduction Fund as some kind of great welfare scheme for polluters But the reality is that 300m 500m 750m 1b drop in the ocean While 2 55 billion sounds like a lot of money you need to consider the nature of the businesses and projects that are expected to deliver emissions abatement Single big emitters have capital expenditure plans which could gobble up the entire Emission Reduction Fund in a single gulp If you look at the raw numbers of tonnes of CO2 to overall business expenditure or revenue for industries outside of power cement and metals smelting it s generally pretty small beer It might sound great for a polluter that they could get a government handout to partly fund a new energy savings project But the guys I spoke to know very well that government money almost always comes with strings attached Those strings can create a whole lot of headaches as bureaucrats suddenly become arbiters of what you can and can t do with your business For a number of companies they re thinking about whether the money on offer will be enough to be worth the inevitable pain Under the current emissions trading scheme a business can develop a projection of what a tonne of CO2 is likely to be worth from a range of analysts and banks They then incorporate that into an overall financial evaluation of each project and then proceed with those that financially stack up all without having to get a single person from the government involved But from what we know about Direct Action if you want government money your business expenditure and operation plants need to work around government officials processes and legal contracts unless somehow they can convert Direct Action into an emissions trading scheme This can lead to delays in proceeding with projects which can then have a flow on impact to other parts of the business leaving things in limbo If it leads to loss of production it doesn t take long for this cost to exceed any money you might be getting out of the government for carbon abatement In addition dealing with government officials can act as a drain on highly constrained management time and attention Also what if you happen to enter a recession and you need to reduce production output This might mean the energy savings project saves less energy than you d contracted with the government Core production decisions now become a matter for negotiation with government For some big emitters the money on the table from Direct Action just doesn t look like enough to be worth the risk and hassle of becoming beholden to government bureaucratic processes Print this page More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down Related articles 10 Jan Obama orders review of energy infrastructure 10 Jan Senators look to revive US climate debate 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again 10 Jan Why not do it again Abbott 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Conni Christensen Fri 2013 12 06 12 08 In other word Green Tape Chris Dodd Fri 2013 12 06 12 31 Direct Action all other invasive political initiatives inevitably rely on governments picking winners in the products and projects they will support with green money This approach denies thousands of valid initiatives from being adopted This centralised planning model for carbon reduction does not work Governments should do what they do best collect taxes and extend fuel excise type taxes onto coal gas and all non renewable fuels With an extra 5 cents on a unit of electricity 2 cents on gas 5 cents on transport fuels the guilding hand of the market will give us the emissions reductions needed James not available Fri 2013 12 06 12 32 I agree direct action is bad policy I vote we don t do it I also vote we dump the Carbon Tax and I vote to dump the RET as well while we re at it Of course the middle one we already voted on and got a mandate so lets get it off the statutes debbie glover Fri 2013 12 06 12 53 meanwhile back in the real world scientists are now saying developed countries like Australia need to cut ghg emissions by 40 by 2020 Barry Ladbrook Fri 2013 12 06 12 55 The cost of bringing abatement to market is not to be under estimated and this bureaucratic approach means that a lot of small scale abatement that cumulatively is very significant will not be tapped There are admin transaction costs with a carbon price but they pale into insignificance next to those associated with a Direct Action grants approach David Robinson Fri 2013 12 06 13 02 Why is it expected that the only emissions reduction action that will occur is if the government pays for it The government is not intending to pay CO2

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/6/policy-politics/abbott-and-hunts-bureaucratic-blindspot (2014-01-12)
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  • Tristan Edis | Business Spectator
    market is being transformed by Tristan Edis 11 05am November 27 16 comments Business pulls out the carbon fiddle Business wants quick repeal of carbon pricing and then a Productivity Commission review of its replacement Not only do we not have time we know what the commission thinks anyway by Tristan Edis 10 28am November 26 13 comments Japan Climate criminal or just a bit mixed up Politicians wanting to cite Japan s emissions backflip as a reason for inaction should remember the Asian giant is the most energy efficient economy in the world by Tristan Edis 12 34pm November 25 7 comments Drinking the green Kool Aid at a Warsaw intermission Environmentalists pin too much on international talks setting themselves up for failure As the US and China are showing it s the domestic arenas that matter most by Tristan Edis 11 02am November 25 9 comments Can the solar bachelor go steady The solar sector was living it up for a few years but 2013 has seen the hangover hit in Yet the 3 billion industry should transition to a more stable lifestyle by Tristan Edis 11 35am November 22 23 comments Emission trading s automatic 15 The ETS could deliver a 15 per cent emissions reduction target if Abbott fails to repeal due to a legislative clause that specifies default levels if parliament can t agree by Tristan Edis 11 26am November 21 21 comments Will the grid beat off solar storage Siemens technology chief sees a range of major energy storage technology innovations on the horizon including in the old lead acid battery But he still thinks the grid will win over solar self sufficiency by Tristan Edis 8 16am November 21 32 comments VIDEO Siemens Energy CTO on the energy revolution In this video interview with Siemens Energy Chief Technology Officer he enthusiastically outlines how a range of technologies including energy storage LED lighting solar more efficient homes computing power smart grids CCS and wind can lower our carbon footprint while enriching our lives by Tristan Edis 2 03pm November 19 4 comments The 7 who ll pay half the carbon tax bill A remarkably small number of companies face a direct liability under the carbon price and just seven will foot more than half the bill with the NSW government leading the pack by Tristan Edis 12 20pm November 19 19 comments The 3 firms that didn t pay the carbon tax Of the 250 firms required to pay the carbon tax just 3 have fallen short including Clive Palmer s nickel refinery The story behind their failure shows no python squeeze from anything other than questionable management and aging facilities by Tristan Edis 12 23pm November 18 40 comments Engineers Masquerading as socialists Technological ingenuity given the chance could enrich our lives while addressing climate change If only our politicians listened to innovative and passionate engineers instead of assuming climate change was socialism masquerading as environmentalism by Tristan Edis 11 43am November 15 47 comments The numbers behind the repeal bill Abbott s speech to parliament on the carbon price repeal bill was full of soaring rhetoric Pity the government s regulatory impact statement failed to provide the economic analysis to back him up by Tristan Edis 11 59am November 14 37 comments ARENA hit by Abbott s axe The Government has slipped through amendments amongst its carbon tax repeal bills that would gut ARENA s ability to fund new projects by Tristan Edis 1 32pm November 13 10 comments An Abbott global emissions fail On current trajectories an Aussie will produce twice the emissions of a Japanese or Chinese citizen and triple that of a European So why does Tony Abbott blame other countries for not upping our emissions target by Tristan Edis 12 12pm November 13 34 comments Page 2 Meridian plots a retail powerplay Unlike other energy retailers with strategies geared to creating temporary agitation Meridian s Powershop aims to permanently upset Australia s big three by Tristan Edis 10 05am December 04 5 comments Why we hate power companies Australians spend more on petrol and about the same on minor pantry items yet we fear power bills the most Why by Tristan Edis 10 21am December 03 42 comments Carbon tax mindless blindness Rio Tinto s Gove alumina refinery won t be the last energy intensive manufacturer to close over the coming years and the carbon tax is not to blame by Tristan Edis 12 22pm December 02 13 comments A gas crisis but demand crumbles AEMO projects NSW could face gas shortages by 2018 yet domestic gas demand is crumbling and won t recover to 2012 levels until as late as 2030 by Tristan Edis 11 35am November 29 18 comments Taking Abbott s fig leaf seriously Direct Action is seen as a charade and a smokescreen But with some small tweaks it might be converted into real carbon market freed from its inadequate budget funding by Tristan Edis 9 40am November 28 22 comments Anti wind lobby twice rebuked In separate findings yesterday the SA EPA and the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal have delivered findings that rubuke the case that wind farms produce noise harmful to our health by Tristan Edis 12 48pm November 27 10 comments Efficiency eats away energy demand ABS data reveals electricity consumption per household is down 23 gas down 15 and petrol down 18 compared to 2002 03 In combination with a contraction in manufacturing Australia s energy market is being transformed by Tristan Edis 11 05am November 27 16 comments Business pulls out the carbon fiddle Business wants quick repeal of carbon pricing and then a Productivity Commission review of its replacement Not only do we not have time we know what the commission thinks anyway by Tristan Edis 10 28am November 26 13 comments Japan Climate criminal or just a bit mixed up Politicians wanting to cite Japan s emissions backflip as a reason for inaction should remember the

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/tristan-edis?page=1 (2014-01-12)
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  • Credit Suisse to advise Coalition on Telstra-NBN deal: report | Business Spectator
    compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Credit Suisse to advise Coalition on Telstra NBN deal report Supratim Adhikari 20 Dec 2013 10 21 AM 2 Technology NBN Buzz Advisory firm to provide guidance on how the existing contract negotiated during Labor s tenure can be tweaked to accommodate the changes to the NBN process You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Credit Suisse has reportedly won the gig to advise the federal government as NBN Co and Telstra get ready to revisit their 11 2 billion deal According to The Australian Financial Review the contract was officially awarded to the advisory firm yesterday Credit Suisse will reportedly provide guidance to the government on how the existing contract negotiated during Labor s tenure can be tweaked to accommodate the changes to the NBN process spelled out by the recent NBN strategic review While Labor s intent was to lease Telstra s network infrastructure to rollout fibre to premises the Coalition s stipulated approach will require the use of portions of Telstra s copper wiring There are also plans to utilise existing cable infrastructure through NBN Co either buying or leasing Telstra s HFC network NBN Co is currently advised by Goldman Sachs while Macquarie Capital is advising Telstra Print this page Related articles 10 Jan ACMA hits Telstra with record fine 10 Jan

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/20/technology/credit-suisse-advise-coalition-telstra-nbn-deal-report (2014-01-12)
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  • Computing Google's robots | Business Spectator
    Tech Google s latest foray into robotics promises to be its most important to date as it harnesses the shift from automatons to intelligent units to crack the man to machine interaction code You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Google has capped off its pre Christmas shopping spree with the acquisition of Boston Dynamics the Massachusetts based robotics company that has so far focused its attention on building a menagerie of mechanised beasts BigDog Cheetah and the LS3 pack mule all designed with military applications in mind This isn t Google s first foray into robotics but it promises to be its most important to date Having previously purchased the likes of Redwood Robotics Meka Autofusss and Bot Dolly the purchase of Boston Dynamics seems like Google adding another piece to the puzzle Just what the end game is open to conjecture but rest assured that Google s robotics division led by Andy Rubin will be keen to put Google s annual R D budget of US7 billion to good use The future is Google s business and presumably given the company s don t be evil mantra mechanised military minions are not on Google s agenda However there are quite a few possibilities on how robotics could be part of the connected world that Google wants to propagate A world where wearable computing self driving cars and automation has freed much of the society from a cycle of daily drudgery as Google CEO Larry Page puts it improve lives It s an admirable sentiment but how does Boston Dynamics aid Google s quest Boston Dynamics started life in 1992 as a spin off off Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT and has since worked extensively with the US military and the Defence Department s Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA In fact it is currently working on a set of humanoid robots dubbed Atlas designed to participate in the DARPA robotics challenge a two year contest with a US2 million prize While Redwood and Meka s core competency lies in graspers and arms and Bot Dolly focuses on robotic camera systems Boston Dynamics has created some of the most impressive functional robots to date The BigDog Cheetah and the LS3 all exhibit substantial motion capabilities especially in rough terrain The integration of sensor actuator control and communications systems when coupled with the range of motion performance exhibited by Boston Dynamic s robots provides a strong base for Rubin s team Put all of these features together and Google has the ingredients for a dynamic robot that can perceive its environment and react accordingly And it s not just about

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/19/technology/computing-googles-robots (2014-01-12)
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  • Apple to provide 24 month warranty to Australian consumers | Business Spectator
    of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Apple to provide 24 month warranty to Australian consumers Supratim Adhikari 18 Dec 2013 3 45 PM Technology Mobility Tech giant cleans up its act on customer guarantees after ACCC bites You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Apple has agreed to provide a two year warranty on all of its products to Australian consumers with the tech giant acknowledging that some of its consumer guarantee policies may have breached Australian consumer law The decision comes after the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission ACCC took Apple to task for making misleading representations to some consumers including that Apple was not required to provide a refund replacement or repair to consumers in circumstances where these remedies were required by the consumer guarantees in the law The ACCC was concerned that Apple was applying its own warranties and refund policies effectively to the exclusion of the consumer guarantees contained in the Australian Consumer Law ACCC Chairman Rod Sims said in a statement The watchdog was also concerned that Apple staff were directing consumers with faulty non Apple manufactured products purchased from Apple to the manufacturer for resolution And that in a number of cases where Apple staff and representatives where misapplying Apple s 14 day return and 12 month limited manufacturer s warranty Apple has now given a formal undertaking to the competition watchdog to ensure that consumers are not mislead about their rights It has

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/18/technology/apple-provide-24-month-warranty-australian-consumers (2014-01-12)
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  • Visionstream to speed up NBN rollout in Tasmania | Business Spectator
    cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Visionstream to speed up NBN rollout in Tasmania Supratim Adhikari 18 Dec 2013 9 49 AM 2 Technology NBN Buzz Telecommunication Leighton Holdings subsidiary says discussions with NBN Co have clarified the approach for fibre delivery across the state You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Visionstream Australia says it is keen to accelerate the rollout of the National Broadband Network NBN in Tasmania after discussions with the new look NBN Co According to the Leighton Holdings subsidiary the discussions have clarified the approach for fibre delivery across the state to more than 200 000 premises Visionstream s statement brings a modicum of certainty to the status of the rollout in Tasmania after the NBN strategic review revealed that the Coalition s multi technology mix MTM approach would cost 11 billion more than the Coalition s pre election price tag of 29 5 billion The NBN rollout in Tasmania had slowed to a trickle with asbestos related pit remediation and contractual dispute between Visionstream and NBN Co halting progress Construction works on parts of the network resumed in November and NBN Visionstream general manager Allan Bradford said that the company has made significant progress on the roll out with 30 crews in Hobart Launceston and Bellerive undertaking pit replacements and fibre hauling These are integral works to ensure the project remains on track and to get the network rolled out Mr Bradford said Visionstream is continuing to construct Fibre Servicing Area Modules FSAM including a large amount of aerial cabling across the State and is issuing tenders for new construction civil works as work packages are released by NBN Tasmania was stipulated to get fibre connected to homes by 2016 with Visionstream awarded a 300 million contract under Labor s Fibre to the Premises FTTP approach However Visionstream has since pushed for additional funding from NBN Co stating that the fibre rollout was costing too much to deliver In a Senate Committee hearing on Tuesday NBN Co chief operating officer Greg Adcock said that the relationship with NBN Co construction partners needed to be rehabilitated

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/18/technology/visionstream-speed-nbn-rollout-tasmania (2014-01-12)
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