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  • Business Accelerators: Cementing value | Business Spectator
    knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Business Accelerators Cementing value Jackson Hewett 26 Sep 2013 10 36 AM Industries Business Accelerators In the final part of our video series on building capital value in your business we talk to Susan Hull of Buildpro Bendigo and Dr Richard Shrapnel of Pitcher Partners on how to enable staff to take the reins You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password In the final part of our video series on building capital value in your business we talk to Susan Hull of Buildpro Bendigo and Dr Richard Shrapnel of Pitcher Partners on how enable staff to take the reins Use this to embed video Print this page More from Jackson Hewett 20 Dec EDITOR S PICKS 2013 13 Dec Editor s Picks 06 Dec Editor s Picks 06 Dec Business Accelerators The growth trap 29 Nov Editor s Picks Connect with Jackson Hewett on Google Related articles 06 Dec Business Accelerators The growth trap 21 Nov The Tasmanian company selling to a Moroccan princess 14 Nov Watch Can Lara Giddings turn Tasmania around 08 Nov Business Accelerators Marketing by storytelling 31 Oct Business Accelerators Starting from scratch More from Business Spectator Technology

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/9/26/business-accelerators/business-accelerators-cementing-value (2014-01-12)
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  • Jackson Hewett | Business Spectator
    Our case study is BuildPro a supplier of building materials in Bendigo Victoria by Jackson Hewett 11 31am September 06 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler unpacks the Coalition s plan for government Gottliebsen puts Mr Infrastructure under scrutiny Bartholomeusz spots a foreign investment flub and Koukoulas takes a punt on GDP data by Jackson Hewett 7 01pm August 30 Business Accelerators Re calibrating physio practice In the latest episode of Business Accelerators we find out whether Coff s Coast Physiotherapy have successfully managed to put into place their plans to increase capacity at their practice and their revenue by Jackson Hewett 11 21am August 30 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler draws a dollar downside Gottliebsen spots a retiree rip off Bartholomeusz analyses BHP s results and Koukoulas questions a Fed hesitation by Jackson Hewett 5 14pm August 23 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler ponders an election irony Gottliebsen spots a housing boom Bartholomeusz runs over CBA s numbers and Koukoulas eyes a proverbial European swallow by Jackson Hewett 7 04pm August 16 Business Accelerators Growing a service business In the latest instalment of our series on taking your small business to the next level we look at how Coff s Coast Physiotherapy can make more of its existing assets by Jackson Hewett 11 22am August 15 Business Accelerators Sweating the assets Service businesses often struggle to find a way to maximise finite resources That s the case at Coff s Coast Physio where each practitioner can only do so much Find out more in the latest Business Accelerator article by Jackson Hewett 11 14am August 09 Ailing print s Washington postscript The great mastheads of America are being offloaded for a pittance and shuffled between an often fickle elite But to thrive serious journalism must find a way to win again by Jackson Hewett 11 28am August 06 4 comments EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler the myth of pay performance Gottliebsen rates Abbott s red letter day Bartholomeusz looks ahead to a potash stoush while Koukoulas spots a super sell age by Jackson Hewett 6 58pm August 02 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler ruminates on a political end game Gottliebsen spots an ASX election ring Bartholomeusz analyses NAB s coup and Koukoulas sets the scene for an August easing by Jackson Hewett 7 05pm July 26 1 comment EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler ponders an NBN marvel Gottliebsen flips a fringe argument Bartholomeusz looks at Billabong while Koukoulas laments an election disconnect by Jackson Hewett 6 17pm July 19 1 comment Business Accelerators The KISS principle Too often sole operators struggle to isolate the core activity that drives the business A trusted advisor can do wonders for seeing the wood for the trees by Jackson Hewett 11 20am July 19 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler pinpoints an IMF catch up Bartholomeusz quantifies Bernanke s influence and Koukoulas examines the effects of a falling Aussie dollar by Jackson Hewett 5 15pm July 12 Welcome to Business Accelerators Business Spectator s innovative video series aimed at taking Australian business to the next level by Jackson Hewett 3 08pm July 11 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler pinpoints an election irony Gottliebsen foreshadows a housing bonanza Bartholomeusz spots a Pilbara play and Koukoulas douses inflation fears by Jackson Hewett 6 01pm July 05 2 comments EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler Gottliebsen and Burgess unpick Labor s upheaval Bartholomeusz delves into gold s decline and Koukoulas predicts a house price push by Jackson Hewett 6 15pm June 28 Page 2 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler bursts the housing bubble hysteria Koukoulas analyses Bernanke s extension of QE Bartholomeusz homes in on bank regulators and Gottliebsen sees big opportunities for small business under Tony Abbott by Jackson Hewett 5 53pm September 20 Watch Master Builders on poor housing starts Wilhelm Harnisch CEO of Master Builders Australia says that low interest rates have not been flowing through to the new home sector Watch to hear how builders are faring in the latest episode of Business Accelerators by Jackson Hewett 11 17am September 19 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s reading list Robert Gottliebsen outlines Abbott s 12 point plan for the economy Stephen Bartholomeusz predicts a mercy killing of Labor s NBN Rob Burgess looks at Parliament s ordinary people and Stephen Koukoulas gives our new PM some points on fiscal management by Jackson Hewett 5 51pm September 13 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Koukoulas runs a ruler over Abbott s economic credentials Burgess says that despite a looming electoral loss we haven t seen the last of Rudd and Gottliebsen predicts a housing boom under the Coalition by Jackson Hewett 6 00pm September 06 Business Accelerators Valuing your business In the next episode of Business Accelerators we look at how you can measure the equity built up in a business Our case study is BuildPro a supplier of building materials in Bendigo Victoria by Jackson Hewett 11 31am September 06 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler unpacks the Coalition s plan for government Gottliebsen puts Mr Infrastructure under scrutiny Bartholomeusz spots a foreign investment flub and Koukoulas takes a punt on GDP data by Jackson Hewett 7 01pm August 30 Business Accelerators Re calibrating physio practice In the latest episode of Business Accelerators we find out whether Coff s Coast Physiotherapy have successfully managed to put into place their plans to increase capacity at their practice and their revenue by Jackson Hewett 11 21am August 30 EDITOR S PICKS In this week s essential reading guide Kohler draws a dollar downside Gottliebsen spots a retiree

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/jackson-hewett?page=1 (2014-01-12)
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  • Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 | Business Spectator
    benefit analysis completed in 2010 indicated that such a phase out would deliver 2 of economic savings through saved energy costs for every 1 of extra cost due to higher purchase cost of more efficient water heaters Yet such a phase out has to date been politically unpalatable because the two primary manufacturers of electric resistance storage heaters DUX and Rheem are both located in NSW So that leaves us with an expansion of the ESS as the most likely option However to ensure such an expansion could be accommodated while keeping costs low a number of reforms would be helpful The fact that Victoria runs a similar model of scheme means participants have been able to see how differences in approach can lead to material differences in administrative burden the integrity of energy savings and breadth of options for saving energy Neither scheme has been perfect and both have had some problems Victoria s scheme has had a question mark hanging over the integrity of energy savings flowing from extensive use of stand by power controllers which switch off TVs when inactive With NSW there was very little supply of energy saving certificates being produced in the early period as the regulator struggled to accredit companies to participate Yet over time we ve seen improvements as both governments have responded to emerging issues Stand by power controllers no longer dominate Victoria s scheme as the regulator adjusted downward the amount of credits such products could generate In NSW the word is that pricing tribunal IPART has upped its game and is responding faster Most notably in spite of doubts from energy retailers both schemes have had no difficulty hitting savings targets Also late last year the NSW government proposed a range of changes to the operation of the ESS that should hopefully see a major expansion in the scope of energy saving activities that would qualify Expansion to energy savings in gas for example would seem an obvious reform given all the concern around rising gas prices and available supply in that state Another important reform would be to better harmonise and integrate the Victorian and NSW schemes Unfortunately the Victorian government has been virtually silent on whether its scheme will continue beyond the current three year phase and is also undergoing a review This seems bizarre given the scheme has had little difficulty hitting targets it delivers a net saving on household energy bills and low income households have been a major beneficiary The prior Coalition energy minister Michael O Brien had been supportive of the scheme and even expanded its scope and ambition But with his appointment as treasurer support has waned under the new energy minister Nicholas Kotsiras In addition energy companies who have been taken by surprise by the drop in electricity demand over the last three years are pushing for these schemes to be scaled back A further 5 per cent drop in electricity demand in NSW by 2020 would be the last thing they need So this year shapes up as an interesting one to see whether both the Victorian and NSW government s make policy on the basis of cost benefit analysis or the lobbying of energy companies concerned about dropping demand for their product Print this page More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down 06 Jan Direct Action doomed to fail Related articles 10 Jan Obama orders review of energy infrastructure 10 Jan Senators look to revive US climate debate 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again 10 Jan Why not do it again Abbott 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Stressed Chef Wed 2014 01 08 13 04 One note of caution the most recent modelling exercise conducted for a possible national white certificate scheme found that under all scenarios considered the scheme led to a small net increase in electricity prices for non participants The reduction in wholesale price pressures was not enough to outweigh individuals share of scheme costs unless they directly benefited from energy savings under the scheme Thus even though the net societal benefits were positive and worth having individuals had to be in it to win it The modelling was no more perfect than usual of course and is open to question on several fronts treatment of learning effects etc And net societal benefits are not to be sneezed at Even so a scheme that increases retail electricity prices even slightly is not an automatic political winner Some governmental hesitation would be understandable Sam Richards Wed 2014 01 08 13 05 There is so much we could do more to reduce electricity usage that would have a bigger effect than carbon taxes but that could be categorised as the dreaded Direct Action which Tristan hates I am doing everything I can to reduce my electrical power consumption it is rather easy to do Most people though still leave everything on 24x7 too much lighting heating cooling and gadgets on the plug all the time We should do things like ban halogen lighting except where essential raise the standard for fridges and water heaters as Tristan mentioned and other appliances much further the cost is minimal during manufacturing We should ban other extravagant 21st century luxuries The home spa should go to as should home swimming pools but that would affect the richer in society So what do we do We have carbon taxes and increase power prices which hit the less well off in society instead of going after the rich who burn power like you would not believe A well off friend of mine

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/8/policy-politics/energy-efficiency-faces-political-check-2014 (2014-01-12)
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  • Unconventional gas is no cure-all | Business Spectator
    gas is no cure all Tristan Edis 18 Dec 2013 12 14 PM Climate Energy markets Policy Politics The effect of shale gas on America s three big thorns foreign oil dependence manufacturing decline and climate is not as revolutionary as first thought You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The boom in shale gas production in the US has captured the imagination of the business press across the world The shale gas revolution as it has been billed is seen as reviving manufacturing in the United States freeing it from dependence on volatile Middle Eastern oil and solving the carbon emissions problem But it pays to keep this so called revolution in perspective There can be little doubt that a surge in gas supply from shale has had a dramatic effect on US gas prices it dropped from about 9 per MMBtu in 2008 to 3 in 2012 At the same time gas fired power s market share rose from 21 per cent in 2008 to 30 per cent in 2012 Yet these charts of the week from the US Energy Information Administration illustrate that this revolution may not be the ultimate cure all some would have us believe Firstly the extent of the reversal in the US dependence on imported petroleum clearly illustrated in the chart below is quite remarkable This has probably been the area that has caused the most excitement among shale revolution advocates US liquid fuels supply by source millions of barrels per day Source US Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release version But what many miss is that the turnaround in import share is as much a function of events on the demand side as the supply side Firstly look at the growth in demand for petroleum fuel from 1980 until 2007 If this had continued imports would have maintained their market share in spite of a surge in tight oil largely shale production But growth in demand for petroleum in the US has been arrested Initially this was due to the GFC economic downturn but its growth in the years beyond is kept low and consumption declines from 2020 The unsung hero in all of this is the reduction in passenger vehicle fuel consumption Thanks in part to fuel economy standards that have been introduced by the Obama administration passenger car fuel consumption will steadily decline by over a fifth to 2040 Energy consumption by light duty vehicles in the US quadrillion Btu Source US Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release version In terms of power generation the boom in shale gas production and drop in

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/18/policy-politics/unconventional-gas-no-cure-all (2014-01-12)
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  • Direct Action funding gone missing | Business Spectator
    climate change initiative This is especially concerning when the ERF is relying on businesses to deliver abatement via large capital investments lasting decades or more One carbon market analyst speculated that it might be that the government expects to encounter difficulty repealing the carbon price post July 2014 They therefore don t want to commit any budget to the ERF until the carbon price has gone However it seems unreasonable that the government expects non Coalition senators to agree to abolition of the carbon price when it is choosing to withhold making clear budget commitments to its own alternative Other key items to come out of MYEFO are Abolition of the carbon price will mean a hit to the budget of 9 4 billion in underlying cash terms over the forward estimates This comes in circumstances where the government finds itself with a serious structural deficit and expects budget deficits totalling 123 billion over the forward estimates 2013 14 to 2016 17 Confirmation of earlier announced cuts to the budget of the Australian Renewable Energy Agency Cuts total 475 million including a saving of 40 million this financial year 2013 14 A surprise announcement that they will be terminating funding for the Energy Efficiency Opportunities program from July 1 2014 That the Coalition expects to reduce their cash outflow associated with Clean Energy Finance Loans by 1 144 billion but at the same time this means they ll sacrifice repayments on these loans of 439 million over the forward estimates and no doubt far more beyond the forward estimates which haven t been revealed It will be abolishing the Low Carbon Communities program which supported energy efficiency initiatives for low income households and community facilities In further news we now know the government will also not be proceeding with provision of funding to applicants who had been successful in a prior tender round The government will not be providing additional support to the existing industry operated destruction incentives program for synthetic greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances from July 1 2014 even though at the same time they will be abolishing the carbon price applying to these gases which provided a strong incentive to reduce the usage of these powerful global warming gases Print this page More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down Related articles 10 Jan Solar and wind competitive with fossil fuels Gov t economist 10 Jan A soil carbon troppo dream 10 Jan Alcoa gives up on aid report 09 Jan EU seeks March start for backloading 09 Jan Carbon markets to rise out of ashes More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/17/carbon-markets/direct-action-funding-gone-missing (2014-01-12)
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  • No silver bullet in an insulation maze | Business Spectator
    halogen downlights were known to be a major fire risk as they had been commonly installed very poorly with nothing covering the very hot light or the transformer Consequently fires were likely in the event either flammable material was placed nearby or they were covered by insulation It s worth noting that the government required insulation to be installed to Australian Standards and these specify that insulation be installed with clearance spaces around lighting fixtures Still given the low cost of halogen lighting covers and their easy installation it would have been smart for the government to require that said covers be installed in any home with halogen downlights simultaneously with insulation The government actually ended up doing exactly this achieving two goals at once substantially reducing fire risks while improving energy efficiency But unfortunately it was several months into the program and media hysteria over homes burning down had already seriously undermined confidence in the program Banning foil and requiring halogen lighting covers are simple changes that if they had been done at the very commencement of the program would have made a big difference to its perceived success Yet before accusing Peter Garrett of industrial manslaughter one needs to keep in mind that at the time the program was conceived and to this very day any person can go down to their local Bunnings and buy insulation to install in their home absolutely no safety checks or qualifications are required and it s perfectly legal Meanwhile even those who installed insulation for a living at the time the program was unveiled were subject to minimal requirements The Insulation Council of Australia and New Zealand observed in a submission to the Senate Inquiry that prior to the insulation program This market segment was in effect unregulated Work in this market was considered of small scale and value and as such anyone could become employed with no experience Prior to the EEHP the Home Insulation Program contractors and installers were not required to have any of the current EEHP prerequisites such as registration OH S certificates or training nor had there been requirements to install insulation to the existing Australian Insulation Installation Standards Yes the government was warned by ICANZ about the risk of electrocution involved in using foil insulation But what you need to also keep in mind is that the sole two companies which make up ICANZ membership Fletchers and CSR completely dominated the supply of the main foil alternative glasswool batts The government would have recognised that if they were to exclude foil from eligibility it would have handed Fletchers and CSR a major market advantage although CSR and Fletchers also produce foil and possibly led to a major hike in the price of insulation At the same time foil insulation suppliers would have complained bitterly about their exclusion being discriminatory If you take the time to read through the submissions to the Senate inquiry you ll find various insulation supplier camps glasswool foil polyester and blow in cellulose Each bitterly complains about the other camp s shortcomings while spruiking their own advantages For example the foil camp complains that other insulation products present more of a fire risk and are not good insulators in tropical climates It would take a brave government official to ban foil when it is possible to install it safely with a reasonable level of care and Australia had then not suffered cases of electrocution from its installation Now of course ICANZ were the only one providing warnings about foil NECA which represents the best interests of the electrical contracting industry according to its website also warned about electrocution risks as well as fire So what did they recommend the government do to mitigate this risk They told the government that all installation of insulation in roof cavities involve a compulsory pre installation inspection by a registered electrical contractor and a follow up inspection at the completion of installation This would have been great at creating work for electrical contractors but it would have been disastrous for the effectiveness of the program in employing low skilled workers and getting large numbers of homes insulated Anyone who s had to get an electrician out to their home recently would know that this would substantially increase the cost of insulating a home and impose a major manpower constraint on its rollout Given that insulation had been rolled out for decades in people s homes without the requirement for an expensive pre inspection and then sign off by an electrician one can probably understand if the government viewed such a demand with a degree of scepticism Yes the government could have paid greater heed to warnings of fire and electrocution and with some simple changes reduced such risks But given the circumstances they faced such decisions may not have been as easy as hindsight suggests Print this page More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 09 Jan Pinning down the real money in a wind war 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down Related articles 10 Jan Obama orders review of energy infrastructure 10 Jan Senators look to revive US climate debate 10 Jan PM takes aim at RET again 10 Jan Why not do it again Abbott 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy John Harding Tue 2013 12 17 17 55 Well said Might I add that it was disgusting to see the behaviour of most companies contractors and back yard operators who simply rhorted the whole scheme with absolutely no concern for their clients no concern for their employees they just focused on grabbing as much of the cash handout as they

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/17/policy-politics/no-silver-bullet-insulation-maze (2014-01-12)
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  • Solar no freeloader | Business Spectator
    electricity bills using this snalysis Log in to post comments Yes don t tell the ESAA Submitted by Chris Fraser on Thu 2013 12 12 14 18 Yes don t tell the ESAA Log in to post comments Report link http apvi org Submitted by Tim Starling on Thu 2013 12 12 15 53 Report link http apvi org au wp content uploads 2013 12 APVA Impacts of technologi Log in to post comments Tristan s case is based on Submitted by Graham Lovell on Thu 2013 12 12 17 47 Tristan s case is based on the premise that the system costs of installing an airconditioner can be offset by the electricity generated by Solar PV at the household level There are two peaks in electricity demand both of them occur around 6 pm with the consistent factor being when workers return home and want the home heated or cooled and evening meals are being prepared The impact of time of day peaks was studied in detail for South Australia in the context of wind power and a summary of the results can be seen here http australiancarbonprice blogspot com au 2012 04 wind power in south You can observe that in South Australia and probably elsewhere the summer peak is higher than the winter peak and obviously air conditioning and pool pumps are the primary additional factors in the summer Yet in a largish suburban home you can install a 5 kW Solar PV and effectively run your airconditioning or your pool pump for almost nothing provided the sun is shining and the solar panels are not shaded Installing Solar PV in such a home will reduce the demand on the system at the time of the summer peak Therefore with judicious management at the government level electricity network development costs can be reduced and eventually that will impact on electricity bills as Solar PV is taken up On this basis it is logically to be expected that Solar PV will reduce electricity bills Whether it is a marginal reduction as suggested in this article or something more substantial as I suspect time will tell On the other side electricity bills will continue to be higher because of the subsidy paid to those who install Solar PV which just gets added to the electricity consumer s bill in proportion to the electricity consumed Unfortunately this is the penalty we all have to pay to meet the demands of the solar lobby who wanted to push solar harder than the economics can currently sustain and the unwillingness of the Federal Labor government to come up with a scheme that put the penalty on all taxpayers something that is unlikely to change under the Coalition In due course household solar costs will come down quite radically whether through the gradual improvement in Solar PV or through a new technology as seems more likely Of course if we were really serious about making immediate increases in renewable energy we would recognize

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/12/solar-energy/solar-no-freeloader (2014-01-12)
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  • Thank you Holden, but Joe was right | Business Spectator
    Log in to post comments This is a common but Submitted by Rick Willoughby on Thu 2013 12 12 20 20 This is a common but mistaken view of Australian mining The mining industry works to its strengths It has been hardened over the decades of periods of boom and bust Rio Tinto has one of the most liberated and competent workforces in Australia Essentially a single status workforce with all salaried employees The work practices have spread globally as has much of the engineering technology and systems Most mines around the world employ some level of Australian management practice and technology An Australian car industry would work to the strengths that the country has Right now there is the basic technology and opportunity to develop lightweight electric cars No populated place on earth enjoys the sunlight that Australia receives I meet all my home electricity needs with a mere 7 of my roof space covered with solar panels If I double my collection I could run a lightweight EV for my daily needs from the excess solar energy no more fuel bills Lithium batteries have made EVs viable and off grid household power supplies economic Off grid solar systems should be packaged items that minimise the design and installation costs Having a manufacturing industry focused on use of solar energy would work to one of the enduring natural advantages of Australia Log in to post comments Australia will never just Submitted by James lastName on Fri 2013 12 13 11 40 Australia will never just become a quarry because we ll always have agriculture Nothing wrong with playing to your strengths It s served us over the past decades by making us the wealthiest nation on the earth on a per capita basis Log in to post comments I don t think it is any Submitted by Andrew Cunningham on Thu 2013 12 12 14 45 I don t think it is any coincidence that California has the largest emissions trading scheme in the USA is also one of the world s foremost innovators of vehicle design Tesla electric cars and Zero Motorcycles are generating immense excitement there and it will be interesting to see the technology rapidly evolve with the introduction of FIA Formulae E racing in 10 capital cities next year France has recently developed a cheaper way to manufacture hydrogen which may be a game changer for the cars our kids will drive Australia needs to keep up with the rest of the world in these technologies which sadly Holden was unable to do valued at over 1 billion and set to become the third largest in the world by 2015 Log in to post comments When I started Mark Group in Submitted by Robert Grant on Thu 2013 12 12 14 47 When I started Mark Group in Sydney 4 years ago we took over the building that had been occupied by Holden as their NSW headquarters vacated because they had shrunk to a handful of staff There was a large warehouse and about 50 desks I remember thinking the day we moved in How the hell am I ever going to fill this place it s too big Three years later we moved to bigger premises because it was too small and we employ more than 150 people and still growing Many of them are young engineers who are passionate about a career in renewables New industries replace old it is the way of the world New jobs are created new sectors are built I just wish we had received a small percentage of the support that the car industry has received or at the very least found a government who wasn t hell bent on killing off the renewables sector We might have been able to employ even more engineers Log in to post comments Onse good news story does not Submitted by R Ambrose Raven on Sat 2013 12 14 12 09 Onse good news story does not make an industry These are good points but don t justify scrapping an entire industry No Holden may not have stayed but the Noalition made sure that it left as it will encourage Toyota to leave as well Abbott the Hun s Noalition is the first in at least our post war history to openly relish the destruction of industries without at least some promise of it being replaced by something better Class warfare has at last come out of the closet whereas previously only individuals such as class traitors Martin Ferguson and Gary Gray had openly demonstrated their commitment to enduring that transnational capitalism received as much of the benefit of the mining boom as possible now with the victory of Abbott the Hun s Noalition in 2013 we have a government formally dedicated to our own impoverishment Casualisation of employment debt serfdom and the increasingly unhealthy dominance of our lives by our work has come to mark contemporary society 99 9 of the population will suffer through further competition leading to a downward spiral of pay and conditions democratically inflicted on self employed and employed alike exactly as has been inflicted on Europe by the policy of Austerity that Hockey et al seek to impose here CEFC is continuing not with government support but as with Holden and Toyota against its opposition My point again Big Mining exemplifies the now very open plunder of society for the benefit of transnational capitalism We still await an explanation as to why huge LNG projects were approved when the only winners were foreign energy transnationals at the cost of Eastern States domestic gas prices tripling to international levels for perhaps twelve million consumers plus all domestic manufacturers Nearly all 99 9 Australians futures are fundamentally threatened by the now open social hatred of the Noalition We therefore cannot afford not to demand that such policies be replaced in all political parties by policies that strengthen rather than destroy an egalitarian harmonious society starting with the

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/12/policy-politics/thank-you-holden-joe-was-right (2014-01-12)
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