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  • China's new flirt with mega-solar | Business Spectator
    wysiwyg field contenteditable false wf deltas 0 wf field field wysiwyg media wf formatter aibm ui media output wf settings style full width wf cache 1389227465 wf entity id 765316 wf entity type node Still Todd Woody at Quartz writes that Trina s new project marks a significant shift in the global solar market revived by the Chinese government s projected solar goals for 2020 By that year China is aiming to have a total of 700 000 MW of renewable energy online including 50 000 MW of solar The new policy came as China s photovoltaic panel makers faced falling revenues and multibillion dollar deficits after embarking on a manufacturing boom that allowed them to corner the global solar market but sent prices plummeting Woody writes Projects such as the power plant in Turpan Prefecture help soak up China s excess manufacturing capacity while creating jobs for local workers The project itself will eventually represent 12 5 per cent of Trina s annual manufacturing capacity according to the Quartz report which says business in China will also account for as much as 30 per cent of Trina s revenue in 2013 up from 13 per cent in 2012 Doug Young at Renewable Energy World however has his doubts I certainly don t want to throw too much cold water on this nascent rebound for China s solar panel makers who along with their global peers have suffered through a prolonged downturn dating back to early 2011 due to massive overcapacity Young writes But amid the bright news potential downside lurks in the risk that payments for some of these mega orders could be slow to come as many solar plant operators are big state owned entities that may lack the funds and skills to pay for and operate all of their ambitious new projects In other words the scope of the project is aggressive maybe too aggressive which may translate to difficultly obtaining financing causing delays But if China which has set a goal of having 35 gigawatts of installed solar power generating capacity by 2015 are to reach those goals aggressiveness may be their only choice Achieving such a grand target will be tough Young writes but big state run companies are showing they will embark on a major new building spree to help Beijing reach the goal This article was originally published at Climate Progress Reproduced with permission Print this page China s new flirt with mega solar Emily Aitken 9 Jan 11 31 AM 1 Climate Solar energy Related articles 10 Jan Solar and wind competitive with fossil fuels Gov t economist 09 Jan Aust hits 2 million solar 08 Jan The evolution of Australian solar businesses 07 Jan Small scale solar PV market trends in 2013 06 Jan Beijing pledges further support for solar industry More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Log in to post comments Comments I

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/9/solar-energy/chinas-new-flirt-mega-solar (2014-01-12)
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  • Emily Aitken | Business Spectator
    Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Emily Aitken China s new flirt with mega solar Could an ambitious 1000 MW solar project in China s stark western region signify a resurgence for the global PV market or will it fail the financing step by Emily Aitken 11 31am January 09 1 comment Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Harnessing the power of the one man brand Ken Phillips 10 Jan 1 58 PM

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/emily-aitken (2014-01-12)
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  • Tinker taper: the Fed's cautious path | Business Spectator
    for confusing forward guidance it is also good and prudent central banking This much is clear Asset purchases may remain at a high level if economic conditions warrant it In a survey conducted over the intermeeting period most participants judged that the marginal benefits of the asset purchases were greater than the marginal costs This indicates that within the Fed additional purchases are regarded as beneficial for the economy But it is worth noting that a majority of survey participants also said the marginal effectiveness of purchases declined as purchases continued indicating that with every additional month the Fed was getting less bang for its buck There are still dovish members of the Fed who are worried that the economy is not strong enough yet to give up on quantitative easing and a few voting members suggested the Fed should lower the unemployment rate threshold used in its forward guidance to 6 per cent down from 6 5 per cent As the vote to reduce bond purchases suggests most members believe that this was unnecessary So expect US interest rates to rise Currently two thirds of participants in the Fed s forecasts believe it will begin raising interest rates in 2015 By that point the Fed expects the unemployment rate to decline to between 5 8 and 6 1 per cent Between the unwinding of its asset purchases and its forward guidance it will be tricky to predict the Fed s actions in 2014 My general view at the moment is that it will continue to taper throughout the year and by the end of 2014 the asset purchasing program will be largely finished But that view relies on inflation picking up and heading back towards expectations If inflation fails to eventuate then the Fed will obviously cease to taper Although the economy has clearly improved we should not underestimate the many road bumps that the Fed will have to navigate as it unwinds its purchases Print this page More from Callam Pickering 10 Jan Dwelling on housing growth is misguided 10 Jan The ECB is failing to do whatever it takes 09 Jan A fast to follow the spending binge 31 Dec Bursting Bitcoin s bubble 27 Dec The American consumer is back Related articles 12 Jan Obama picks Fed vice chair 11 Jan US jobs growth slows sharply 10 Jan Fed s Yellen expects 3 growth 10 Jan US jobless claims dip 09 Jan ORIGINAL TEXT Fed minutes More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Ken not available Thu 2014 01 09 09 48 QE kills the yield curve so is the public sector going to create jobs The USA has run fiscal deficits since Adam was a boy the yanks just loath paying tax Time to grow up and pay your way Phil Clarke Thu 2014 01 09 11 51 One thing is absolutely certain in all this to anyone communicating with friends or relatives in America None of this information paints a true picture of the state of modern America It is very difficult to seperate spin and propaganda from fact or to totally dismiss one analysis on grounds of inaccuracy and replace it with an accurate one Sometimes the only recourse is to listen to many different sides of the argumant and leave the conclusion dangling A couple of days ago I saw a reference on Business Spectator to one such differing approach In the light of all these rather de humanised statistics I think it is worth looking at http www upworthy com 9 out of 10 americans are completely wrong about It is also useful to note how some people within America are beginning to assess the nations social and economic problems It rather conforms with the suggested account Australia is poised between two major armed economic camps The US and China Many of our people come from a third camp that of the UK and Europe None of the three social political economic models seem to have much to offer this country as models It really is time we rethought and recreated our own To do that requires a cleansing of both major parties and for minority parties to be a little more practical America s vicious class system and corrupted body politic has nothing to offer nor has the singularly incompetent and socially enraging European Austerity model I would assume that very few would seek the totalitarian and elitist Chinese model Quo Vadis Australia one thing is certain our present course of selling out to overseas investment slagging of at trade unions desperately seeking to maintain and protect living standards and being run by a puppet Government installed by an overseas media baron isn t the way either Ken not available Thu 2014 01 09 12 18 Phil it is surprising how much we agree and it is surprising how much we disagree You would remember the term Divide and conquer for me that term describes Politics In Australia we do as you say have the option of creating our own reality Yet we are still tarred with the brush of inferiority If things go wrong it is always the fault of the government no not the political ideal that you voted for it was the other bunch of idealists Our life is our life there is nothing more one day we will be going back to the soil and what we do in the meantime is up to us Life is simple we can whinge and moan or we can make suggestions that are realistic This country has immeasurable talent from the cross pollinated gene pool that we hold I get knocked for talking about energy states that few on BS can comprehend its time to get our act together and stop the bloody politspeak there is a real world

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/9/us-economy/tinker-taper-feds-cautious-path (2014-01-12)
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  • Pinning down the real money in a wind war | Business Spectator
    are causing health problems According to The Australian Davis told Dutton I receive regular correspondence from Victorians living in the vicinity of wind farms who report health effects He also wrote unfortunately there is a paucity of research available to enhance the community s understanding of this matter and to inform appropriate government actions and policy development I consider that a national approach to research is needed His own department seemed pretty emphatic in their own published advice that wind farms simply do not produce a level of infrasound that has a chance of being harmful to human health Yet Davis believes there is a paucity of research to guide government policy What s going on here Davis seems far from convinced wind farms are a non issue so is he really directing the Health Department to cover up a threat to human health Or maybe health officials could be getting brown paper bags from wind farm developers Laurie complains to the ABC journalist We help any individual group as best we can with very limited financial resources but it is truly a David and Goliath battle Yet one suspects that her side isn t really lacking for money power and influence Let s have a look at those leading the anti wind farm battle Peter Mitchell who founded the Waubra Foundation has held chairman roles on a number of listed resources companies and is the owner of the grand historic property of Mawallok described here in all its grandeur Another board member of the foundation that really has no genuine links to the town of Waubra is Dr Michael Wooldridge former health minister under the Howard government Waubra Board member Tony Hodgson was the founding partner of Ferrier Hodgson one of Australia s largest and most successful corporate restructuring and insolvency firms And Charlie Arnott hails from a family that made its fortune from Arnott s Biscuits and also happened to own a spectacular multi million dollar beach house overlooking Wategos Beach in Byron Bay Another leading wind farm critic Maurice Newman is the chair of the prime minister s Business Advisory Council no less and headed up one of the biggest investment banks in the country In reality Coalition politicians find themselves besieged by a group of rich and powerful people who are very capable of making their voices heard within the Liberal Party So far they haven t had much luck in bending government officials and health researchers to their point of view So in spite of studies finding wind farms produce no appreciable infrasound above background levels in neighbouring homes the government has been pushed into commissioning yet another wild goose chase of a study Print this page More from Tristan Edis 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan Five good things about Direct Action 08 Jan Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 07 Jan An energy debate in smelt down 06 Jan Direct Action doomed to fail Related articles 10 Jan Solar and wind competitive with fossil fuels Gov t economist 10 Jan Why not do it again Abbott 10 Jan EPA seeks feedback on Granville Harbour wind farm 10 Jan EPA seeks feedback on Granville Harbour wind farm 10 Jan Castlemaine community wind farm site to change More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy keith williams Thu 2014 01 09 12 15 Let s hope 2014 brings lots of noise from the overwhelming percentage of people living near wind farms who have no health issues with them and in fact are strongly supportive of wind farms The number of complainants is so vanishingly small that I wonder if the wind farm companies have considered offers to resettle on generous terms I suppose those affected would say this was a bribe but other energy projects do involve resettlement of affected people To have an affected person request that a wind farm turn off its turbines so that her family can visit safely for Xmas indicates the surreal world that some people live in a bit like asking for a highway to be closed because the noise is disturbing Whatever it s time for pushback to rich white mostly males who think they have the right to have their antiquated and dangerous views win the day Mike Barnard Thu 2014 01 09 12 16 Thanks for not referring to Ms Laurie by the title doctor As she testified in Ontario last year she s no longer allowed to use that honorific 418 As a result of a complaint filed with the AHPRA in 2013 that her current activities discussed below constituted practice as a physician she voluntarily agreed not to use the title honourific Doctor or Dr She states that she has done so in order to avoid any potential misunderstanding by members of the public regarding her status as a practicing physician http www dufferinwindpower ca Portals 23 Downloads Final ERT 20decisio The five pages between 98 103 of reasons that the Ontario Tribunal gave for dismissing Ms Laurie as a witness and the majority of her evidence are well worth reading for anyone observing Waubra The Foundation as it flails about pretending not to be anti wind when in fact that s all it is It was likely a bad day in WTF s mahogany lined boardroom when those five pages were passed around I m surprised Mitchell didn t cut off her head but I suppose finding anyone with any credentials no matter how frail immaterial historical and stale to argue against wind energy is difficult Perhaps he just holds his nose and carries on Dave Thu 2014 01 09 12 33 Great words Tristan For a bunch of big fossil fuel business cronies they have done a pretty lowsy job covering up their tracks into the anti wind

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/9/wind-power/pinning-down-real-money-wind-war (2014-01-12)
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  • Spectators | Business Spectator
    in WA will remind Chinese investors of the pitfalls of being ill prepared for Australia s luxurious work conditions environmental rules and native title demands by Peter Cai 07 18am January 09 26 comments Athens 2014 is not Sarajevo 1914 The centenary of World War I will see many commentators looking to draw parallels between the political ructions of today s Europe and the calamity that led to the Great War It should not be used as justification for failing European integration by Oliver Marc Hartwich 07 03am January 09 9 comments Blowing bubbles and the stagnation puzzle Finally mainstream economists are beginning to accept the reality of secular stagnation But are permanent government deficits and asset bubbles the only solution by Steve Keen 06 39am January 09 32 comments Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain by Stephen Fay 06 38am January 09 8 comments Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success by Daniel Palmer 03 31pm January 08 Dairy sector takes the cream in a Murray Goulburn bid Murray Goulburn s synergies and co operative structure could channel incentives to expand production back to farmer suppliers Its bid could be a boon for the dairy sector by Stephen Bartholomeusz 02 46pm January 08 8 comments The evolution of Australian solar businesses The last 10 years has seen rapid change and competitive growth in Australia s PV industry and no doubt businesses will need to continue to innovate to ensure survival by Nigel Morris 12 12pm January 08 1 comment Energy efficiency faces a political check in 2014 Energy efficiency schemes in NSW and Victoria are hitting targets and saving households and businesses but both are up for review NSW seems keen to expand their scheme but Victoria s Minister appears cold by Tristan Edis 12 08pm January 08 6 comments Deniers preferring the dark money route Climate denial organisations are increasingly using pass through organisations to conceal their donors likely explaining an apparent decline in contributions from the likes of Koch Industries and ExxonMobil by Douglas Fischer 08 39am January 08 76 comments Crunch time for California s pioneering carbon market California s carbon market has sidestepped the problems of Europe s version and enjoyed a bumper year But its expansion into transport fuels will test the model in 2014 by Rory Carroll 08 39am January 08 Abbott s deadly dilemma on electoral reform Tony Abbott finds himself in a tug of war between keeping the minor party dominated Senate pushing through his policies and implementing genuine electoral reforms to prevent the gaming

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/spectators?page=1 (2014-01-12)
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  • Spectators | Business Spectator
    expansion into the US Given its history of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence by Stocks In Value 12 30pm January 10 2 comments Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential by Tristan Edis 10 52am January 10 12 comments Dwelling on housing growth is misguided Dwelling investment will rise during 2014 but the shift towards cheaper less labour intensive high density housing means it will not be enough to offset the mining investment cliff by Callam Pickering 10 46am January 10 62 comments A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market by Ric Brazzale 10 11am January 10 3 comments A soil carbon troppo dream An Australian think tank headed by retired military types including a former Howard government governor general has offered an alluring vision for the Coalition irrigate the north and solve carbon emissions Pity it won t work by Ben Rose 10 03am January 10 20 comments Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete by Ben Shepherd 09 45am January 10 1 comment Negative spin Europe s amazing electricity prices Europe s fierce storms have sent wind turbines wild pumping power into the continent s grid and driving electricity prices into negative territory by Karolin Schaps Vera Eckert 09 12am January 10 5 comments The ECB is failing to do whatever it takes The European Central Bank is too focussed on the long term outlook when eurozone countries need desperate and immediate relief Failing to cut rates last night will lead to further disinflation and slower growth by Callam Pickering 08 34am January 10 16 comments Unemployment coming to a suburb near you With unemployment tipped to rise this year some Australian communities will be hit particularly hard including areas not usually associated with social disadvantage by Bill Mitchell by Scott Baum 08 03am January 10 96 comments Howlers abound in The Wolf of Wall Street There are plenty of hedonistic highs in Martin Scorsese s The Wolf of Wall Street but the important stories of disgraced stockbroker Jordan Belfort s victims remain untold by Mathew Murphy 07 13am January 10 11 comments Australia is not the key to China s resource prison CITIC Pacific executives played on China s fears of resource insecurity to justify the terrible performance of their Pilbara mine It s an argument that does more harm than good to both China and Australia by Peter Cai 07 12am January 10 11 comments A fast to

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/spectators?destination=node/12948 (2014-01-12)
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  • Australia's growth is all in the family | Business Spectator
    entrepreneur who doesn t exit and passes his or her creation onto the children Ah now that is something very special Take Haymes Paint the Ballarat based business started in 1935 by Henry Haymes with his brothers and now owned and managed by his son David after he bought out his uncles Haymes has held out against waves of industry consolidation knocking back offer after offer to keep the business in the family and is now the only true independent left in the business And it s valued in fact there s a painter working on the outside of our house at the moment who swears by Haymes Paint Or Ray White a 1902 Toowoomba start up that is now Australia s largest real estate agency in the hands of the third generation and about to pass to the fourth I have spoken to a few dozen like them this year and have always come away inspired by the business and by the family The question for the nation as it searches for post GFC growth in an era of struggling manufacturing industry is how do you bottle this How does government policy encourage more Hofmanns the family in Perth exporting high quality engineering products to China Or more Tim Reids the Tasmanian farmer who sends Japanese cherries to Japan Or more Paechs the South Australian family exporting jam around the world The answer is it probably can t The best any government can do is get out of the way A lot of family businesses start because someone lost their job and had to do something that was how Bates Saddles began during the Great Depression after George Bates was sacked from his job sewing saddles But most start because someone wants to get rich or because they want to control their own destiny or simply because the urge to create can t be denied These are yearnings that cannot be manufactured by well meaning ministers because they already exist in plentiful supply Governments can only crush them These days a lot of start ups have something to do with the internet Those are mostly aimed at a cash exit not at the creation of dynasty We live in a globalised age when a small group of great start ups Google Facebook Amazon eBay Twitter hit the jackpot and became the Andrew Carnegie William Randolph Hearst and Henry Ford of the modern era The influence of these businesses on the world is impossible to exaggerate The immense wealth they have generated in a lot less than one generation is inspiring millions of wannabes and funding thousands of exits The new game in the world of entrepreneurship is to create something that Google or Facebook or one of the other tech consolidators buys out As a result to some extent the 19th and 20th century ambition to leave a business to support your children and their children is being replaced in the 21st century by the less complicated objective of cash But to be honest most start ups and family businesses are not glamorous They are small mundane affairs that just happen to employ the largest number of Australians They are the cafés clothing shops legal practices and trucking businesses the mowing franchises and architects that sit on every second street corner and are working in every second house Mostly they are just getting by paying payroll tax and doing their quarterly Business Activity Statement and often ploughing every spare dollar back into the business trying to grow it and employ more people It s on these businesses that the nation is built and will rely on in future They are the mammals that will outlive the industrial dinosaurs The Abbott government has declared that one of its key aims is to support small business and independent contracting by cutting red tape and getting out of its way Let s hope the louder bleating of dinosaurs doesn t distract them from this task Print this page More from Alan Kohler 30 Dec Letter to Robert Gottliebsen 18 Dec No crisis but taxes still need to rise 16 Dec Income tax has to go up 12 Dec Unlike the Holden family the Bates stuck with saddles 12 Dec The NBN s D Day Dunkirk or Normandy Connect with Alan Kohler on Google Related articles 18 Dec Cashing in on the Christmas calm 18 Dec The 8 step guide to holiday business success 16 Dec NAB SPONSORED CONTENT A game plan for the future 12 Dec Unlike the Holden family the Bates stuck with saddles 11 Dec Walking the work life tightrope More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Grant Mason Thu 2013 12 19 09 32 Alan you talk about the positive contribution of small business but say nothing about the tax system and culture that does not give them a break For instance with a PTY limited company the first dollar of profit is taxed at the same rate as one billion and first dollar of profit of the biggest companies that is at 30 If Australia is on about the fair go and giving the start up business a fair go then perhaps there should be graduated tax with tax free threshold The current system is kind of setup not to champion the pursuit of profit but with distrust of profit There would have to be some limitations that only certain types of businesses or those small businesses that employ staff would get the tax free threshold graduated tax so as not the SMSF and family trusts etc You Business Spectator might do some investigative journalism and report how small businesses are treated elsewhere and which countries are best for small businesses Another area of break is depreciation requirement Depreciation is nothing but a tax grab by the government

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/19/family-business/australias-growth-all-family (2014-01-12)
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  • Unlike the Holden family, the Bates stuck with saddles | Business Spectator
    other interesting thing about Bates Saddles is that in just three generations there have been four cash buyouts that have removed the potential for the sort of conflicts that often beleaguer family businesses as they spread through the generations George Bates started the business in 1932 after he was sacked during the Great Depression from his job as saddler by borrowing 100 from his sister and buying an industrial leather sewing machine He ran up the saddles on the porch and as soon as his son Donald could remain upright on a bicycle he delivered them by bike Apparently Don s record was five saddles at once His other son Gordon worked outside the business as an accountant and did the books for his dad at night Eventually Don bought George out so that when Gordon s son Ron joined the business 50 years ago his uncle Don was the sole owner and George had retired sort of He was still running up saddles at home on his old sewing machine Oh and it turned out that Gordon and Don had been pretty fine boy sopranos performing all over Perth until their voices broke at which point Gordon became a pianist and Don a drummer They were pretty good musicians as well and played at weddings and parties in their spare time Eventually Gordon started his own wedding reception business and left Bates Saddles to his brother The wedding receptions business went quite well so that when Don was getting snowed under by the growth of the saddle business Gordon was able to sell the wedding business and use the money to buy 50 per cent of the business from Don and join him in running it Don had two daughters Carol and Lyn Gordon had two sons Ron and Ken The two girls both married and their husbands Ian and Ray both joined the business Ron was called up for national service in Vietnam but Ken stayed home because of chronic hay fever and worked upstairs at the saddlery making saddles After two years in Vietnam Ron returned home and joined the business as well It s now 1983 Don and Gordon own 50 per cent each of the business and have both retired Their sons and sons in law are running the business but that can t last long Ian and Ray hadn t grown up in the business like Ron and Ken and hadn t done the trade Inevitably they fought So in 1985 Ron and Ken decided to buy them and their father out They sold the firm s real estate and took on a mortgage to pay out Don s side of the family with cash and then did a deal with their own father Gordon to pay him a life pension out of the business they didn t have enough cash The business was then 50 50 Ken and Ron Soon after that the Bates became the world pioneer of synthetic saddles using the same fabric that wet suits are made from This cut the price of saddles by half while leaving a good profit margin and that business took off Ten years ago at the same time as the sewing machines above the shop were turned off and manufacturing was moved to a Taiwanese owned factory in Vietnam Ron bought out Ken Once again Bates Saddles is owned 100 per cent by a Bates Ron has two daughters Ellen and Emily Ellen works in the United Kingdom for a Melbourne based company called WeatherBeeta which is one third owned by Bates Saddles It s a wholesaler of horse rugs and accessories and operates 50 Horseland retail stores around Australia Emily is a marketer and was working in the business until a few months ago when she resigned to have her first child Happily Ron now 65 has a good accountant and a good marketing manager helping to run the business and has been able to wind down to three to four days a week He says he doesn t want to sell the business but doesn t know how the next succession of this iconic 80 year old Australian business will go Will Ellen and Emily saddle up as it were Time will tell Print this page More from Alan Kohler 30 Dec Letter to Robert Gottliebsen 19 Dec Australia s growth is all in the family 18 Dec No crisis but taxes still need to rise 16 Dec Income tax has to go up 12 Dec The NBN s D Day Dunkirk or Normandy Connect with Alan Kohler on Google Related articles 19 Dec Australia s growth is all in the family 18 Dec Cashing in on the Christmas calm 18 Dec The 8 step guide to holiday business success 16 Dec NAB SPONSORED CONTENT A game plan for the future 11 Dec Walking the work life tightrope More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy tim ainsworth Thu 2013 12 12 09 52 Great series Alan always a good read thnx John Skuja Thu 2013 12 12 10 26 Now here s a thought provoking article The firm s R D is done here in Australia therefore generating some employment and the owners reside in Australia and therefore the profits presumably imported into Australia generate some further employment The manufacturing and distribution costs are spent entirely outside of Australia so there s no employment spin off there The only part of the iconic 80 year old Australian business that is Australian appears to be the R D component Craig Chapman Thu 2013 12 12 10 29 Thanks Alan for sharing this story John Skuja Thu 2013 12 12 11 05 Stephen Bartholomeusz said today re Holden that If we honestly evaluate much of the rhetoric from the various sides of this debate

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/12/family-business/unlike-holden-family-bates-stuck-saddles (2014-01-12)
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