archive-au.com » AU » B » BUSINESSSPECTATOR.COM.AU

Total: 1320

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Ric Brazzale | Business Spectator
    the downward pressure could remain in the near term by Ric Brazzale 11 14am June 27 1 comment Biggest Australian renewable energy generators in 2012 Wind is the largest creator of LGCs accounting for 60 per cent but a hydro facility was the power station that created the most in 2012 by Ric Brazzale 8 25am June 25 Renewables on target for 22 by 2020 There is confusion over how the RET has been calculated leading to deceptive numbers about the likely percentage of renewables to be reached by 2020 Truth is it remains firmly in line with expectations by Ric Brazzale 8 02am May 29 4 comments Keeping solar water heater growth in check Almost 10 per cent of Australian dwellings now have solar water heaters but the removal of government support has seen a sharp scale back in installations over the last couple of years by Ric Brazzale 8 40am April 19 1 comment How saturated is Aussie solar Australia reaching one million solar rooftops created quite the media stir but there were several insights missed Specifically which states are leading the way and how saturated is the Australian market by Ric Brazzale 7 34am April 17 780MW for small solar in 2013 Clean Energy Regulator The Clean Energy Regulator has just released its 2013 target for small scale renewable energy that electricity retailers must meet 35 7m certificates For solar PV this will require 780 megawatts of capacity to be installed by Ric Brazzale 11 41am March 18 Queensland s solar dominance New figures highlight Queensland s influence on the PV market as Australians continue to embrace solar by Ric Brazzale 9 58am February 04 CLIMATE SPECTATOR A speedy descent in electricity demand Solar PV and hot water installation energy efficiency measures and a milder winter all contributed to the fourth straight decline in electricity consumption in NEM states by Ric Brazzale 11 17am January 10 Electricity demand s speedy descent Electricity consumption in the NEM states has softened for the fourth straight year and is now 5 5 per cent off the peak The installation of solar PV solar hot water energy efficiency measures and a milder winter all played their part by Ric Brazzale 11 32am January 08 Australia usurps the solar throne Australian households embraced solar PV more than any other nation last year surprisingly outstripping the demand of Germany Italy US China and Japan by Ric Brazzale 9 14am August 21 A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market by Ric Brazzale 10 11am January 10 3 comments Making a Million Solar Roofs work Homeowners have already embraced solar The Coalition s big opportunity is to tailor the new rebate to lower income households and renters by Ric Brazzale 12 46pm September 30 3 comments Hunt s rebate can stop solar s slide Rather than being bad

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/ric-brazzale (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A soil carbon troppo dream | Business Spectator
    account for up to 65 per cent of planned emissions reductions as originally stated in the Liberals climate policy now removed from their website No reputable soil scientists from the CSIRO or the universities say this is achievable and I explained how this idea has no chance of being achieved even if 2 10 times the money allocated were thrown at it But the Coalition is evidently unfazed by the lack of scientific evidence and seems more concerned with creating impressive visions Late last year a defence oriented think tank produced a conceptual paper which cites no author or references and appears to advocate soil magic Future Directions International is chaired by former governor general and military hero Sir Michael Jeffery it includes several distinguished military and business luminaries on its board and over a dozen professors as associates The paper is entitled Regenerate Australia Our Greatest Challenge and Opportunity Having worked for 15 years in land and soil management I was pleased to be asked to have a look at it But it soon became evident that the anonymous author has no knowledge of rangelands tropical agriculture soil carbon or carbon emissions and has not listened to anyone who has The paper proposes introducing sufficient grazing to reduce vegetation by digging 200 000 earth tanks across the wet tropics and has the grand aims of managing additional grain production to feed up to one billion people and running up to 100 million cattle about four times the existing national herd What is truly dismaying is the paper s linking of this grand strategy to carbon abatement Over time this could double carbon fixation of Australia s green deserts These bio systems should be able to fix 5 10 tonnes of carbon per hectare per annum resulting in the possible sequestration of over 1500 million tonnes of carbon per year or 10 times Australia s current annual industrial carbon There are many false statements and omissions in the paper Firstly the best possible soil carbon uptake is by irrigated crops and pastures up to 2 tonnes CO2 per hectare and perennial pastures on country with high water tables up to 1 6t see this study for further detail The author s claim of 5 tonnes of carbon which equates to 18 tonnes of CO2 is preposterous and irresponsible even if he were talking about the world s most productive irrigated soils That he claims it for over 300 million hectares of wet tropics most of which is hard country with poor soils and no significant potential to harvest fresh surface or ground water for irrigation is crazy kite flying Secondly it omitted the fact that 100 million cattle emit about 100 million tonnes CO2 equivalent of methane from ruminant digestion Thirdly intensive rangeland grazing invariably causes soil erosion and loss of carbon in times of drought which occurs at least annually through the 10 month dry period of the tropical north Another unfounded premise of the paper is that the carbon emitted by rangeland burning could be prevented and instead fixed in the soil This is partly possible but not economically feasible If the cane grasses that occur naturally on the minor percentages of better soil could be cultivated or mulched in when green and not grazed or cropped some of the carbon maybe up to 2 tonnes CO2 per hectare could be sequestered in the soil But what would be the cost of cultivation by heavy machinery with no agricultural production I estimate about 200 per hectare or more than 100 per tonne CO2 a pointless exercise that would have to be continued indefinitely to prevent release of carbon back into the atmosphere by erosion and oxidation Let s be optimistic and say that the Ord River Scheme could be expanded several fold to produce irrigated crops from up to 100 000ha or 0 003 per cent of the 300 million hectares of wet tropics cited in the paper It may even provide up to 200 000 tonnes of CO2 abatement per year in soils or 0 02 per cent of the 85 million tonnes the Coalition needs The Ord is of great social and strategic importance enabling a town tourism and agriculture to be built in a previously uninhabited area Other areas suitable for irrigation should be identified and costed more schemes like the Ord would be great for the nation Even better if they could be made economic but this has not been achieved despite 45 year years of intensive work and investment in the Ord It will take a lot more than a few million dollars in carbon credits to achieve that This is not to say that land management in the wet tropics cannot deliver some carbon abatement The greenhouse gas nitrous oxide is emitted during hot savannah burns Indigenous communities are already creating carbon abatement by conducting cool burns in the cooler months but this has nothing to do with increasing cattle grazing or irrigating vast tracts of land Papers such as this by the FDI do nothing towards cheap carbon abatement Sir Michael his board of directors and professorial associates would be well advised to ensure that all of their papers are peer reviewed with references by experts One hopes that the Coalition is not linked in any way to this paper as it would only cause embarrassment and loss of credibility to both parties Ben Rose is a Western Australian land management scientist who has consulted in carbon sequestration analysis He worked for a year in tropical agriculture on the Ord River five years in rangeland management and 10 years in soil conservation Print this page More from Ben Rose 14 Sep CLIMATE SPECTATOR Abbott s abatement black hole 14 Sep Abbott s budget and abatement black hole 27 Mar CLIMATE SPECTATOR The Coalition s carbon illusion 27 Mar Greg Hunt s carbon illusion Related articles 10 Jan Marking the milestones of 2013 09 Jan 2014 may be even hotter 06 Jan Australia s hottest year mostly warm eleswhere 20 Dec ANZ Bank is blowing the carbon budget 20 Dec China s polar expansion to include climate focus More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Michael Rynn Fri 2014 01 10 10 41 Entropy analysis Permaculture analysis Getting carbon into the soil along with other soil improvement and keeping it there is a process of adding considerable order to the soil which requires sources of low entropy It is best done by an entire ecosystem Native species and ecosystems were probably the optimal performers over long evolutionary succession but with human interventions introduced species upsetting the balance soil quality is likely declined from the maximum possible given inland tropical locations There is an upper limit to the ecosystem density and low entropy it can hold given the climate Increased warming from climate change will affect the viability of what is left If any of this soil project manifesto requires recurrent amounts of direct or indirect inputs from fossil fuel energy as most human economic activies do forget about it It is then neither economic nor an example of net carbon sequestration Michael Rynn Fri 2014 01 10 10 49 There may be some design possibility that can establish a low density permaculture But it would need to be designed to be self maintaining Beyond that don t even think of economic exploitation or a positive economic return Exploitation and sustainability do not mix in a harsh environment Ken Mortensen Fri 2014 01 10 23 24 Bull shit seems to improve soil quality I m sure it can handle a bit more John Holmes Sun 2014 01 12 22 03 Problem is that its in the wrong place and transport is so expensive for politicians Geoff Grace Fri 2014 01 10 12 43 This carbon sequestration proposal has been around for about 20 years It continues to have too many risks and uncertainties because of the imprecise concept We do not want the experience of failures in implementation such as caused by the former government and now resulting in a Royal Commission The one proven natural abatement is to massively plant native tree plantations that remove carbon and also convert CO2 and release oxygen Our climate may just benefit from more oxygen and less hot air Geoff Grace Fri 2014 01 10 12 44 This carbon sequestration proposal has been around for about 20 years It continues to have too many risks and uncertainties because of the imprecise concept We do not want the experience of failures in implementation such as caused by the former government and now resulting in a Royal Commission The one proven natural abatement is to massively plant native tree plantations that remove carbon and also convert CO2 and release oxygen Our climate may just benefit from more oxygen and less hot air Nigel not available Fri 2014 01 10 12 52 Oh dear the recurrent pipe dream of developing the north profitably It would have been a good idea to have somebody review this nonsense wayne sharpe Fri 2014 01 10 13 06 This idea and a paper were presented this paper to the bi partisan meetings which the Libs refused to attend at one of the 3 forums to develop the Carbon Farming Initiative which focused exclusivity on soil carbon The reason it never got off the ground then and may never is as you said the science is subject to too much debate especially in terms of Additionality and Permanence the key factors required to issue offsets under every major Carbon Credit standard in fact it was the scientific debunking of these soil carbon credits that led to the demise of Chicago Climate Exchange who did a Tony created their own soil carbon credits based on non scientific solutions with none of the key factors met its the main reason why Carbon Trade eXchange uses third party verified internationally recognized credits that are fully issued in third party registries under recognized scientifically proven methodologies those 3 forums were recorded and having attended them all id suggest the current cabinet should all watch them given no one from that party were at any of them everyone got to say their piece and the committee chose the best options and put them to public comment to boot soil carbon didn t make the cut Chris Fraser Fri 2014 01 10 13 31 There should be a rigorous discussion on additionality and permanence of this idea Sequestering by growing things appears to be self defeating due to death and decay within the biosphere essentially keeping the carbon balance neutral There would have to be some way of maturing trees as example for timber and pulp then harvesting and separating it from the carbon cycle to give us perhaps 100 years of sequestration As this idea would be applied over vast distances it does appear to be very energy intensive That must have been one of Wayne s forums final realisations It is more efficient to stop emitting rather than try to clean up afterward Ian MacCulloch Fri 2014 01 10 16 22 An interesting article by Mr Rose Trials at the Otise Otize Mine in New Mexico in the 1990 s on the wasteland of spent ore heaps indicated bacteria remediation of cyanide would lead to enhanced fertility in the non soil of the spent ore heaps An area of about 0 4 ha was treated for cyanide remediation This native species in the area regenerated from wind blown sources by themselves over an 18th month period Unfortunately I am unable to attach an image showing the area with the new fauna profile This is a great result in a semi arid regime In summary these developments coming out of the mining industry may have applications elsewhere such as carbon in soil storage Worth a thought Martin Taylor Fri 2014 01 10 18 30 I congratulate the creators of the REGC O paper for having a plan Without a plan there will be no progress except in those rare seen serendipitous situations Its a grand plan and it would appear obvious that it have been created by the output of a structured process that deals with all the bad arse outcomes in a creative way and thus enables solutions to many many many problems in one overarching set of of circumstances I propose a set of slogans to assist in the community buy in needed for such a grand plan Lets start Stop the carbon Turn back the carbon Buy back the carbon and my favourite Send back the carbon by making water craft and thereby solving another apparent problem of my government Naturally no public discussion or peer review is allowed for operational reasons but the process would make exceptions for high level country to country contacts of a military nature Otherwise with every tonne of iron ore we also send some solid carbon also known as metallurgical coal and like when we export uranium we will only sell to those whom we know will use these products wisely and expect them to dispose of the waste products in the approved manner Please send me the timeline for the scoping study I d like to work on this project BTW Mother nature has a way of fixing carbon the outcome is called coal Ken Mortensen Sat 2014 01 11 00 23 Well Martin if coal are the villain we should burn it with the steak These days we can use coal powered machines to bury coal by products Coal has now replaced termites in what took them a lifetime to convert world heritage parks into a sauce fair shake of energy I d settle for the iron whore any day She has her roots in the forest Chrispy 52 Fri 2014 01 10 20 44 I don t think fiddling around with soil or planting trees will make much difference Soil has been covered in the article Let s look at trees Australia is about 7 7 million sq km in area If we plant or replant trees to 1 of it and assume one tree per four sq metres such that each tree is two metres from any other tree that would mean about 19 billion trees would need to be planted If Abbott s Green Army of 15 000 all did nothing but actually plant trees and assuming they could plant 1500 a day each which seems to be roughly the figure given on most sites seems a lot this would take them about four years An Australian tree planting organisation called Carbon Neutral quotes 3 75 a tree This means that 19 billion trees would cost over 70 billion Goodbye budget surpluses and debt reduction But I suppose some tree planting would help We need to reduce carbon and global warming somehow It might be better to concentrate most of the efforts on reducing carbon emissions rather than creating oxygen though Ken Mortensen Sat 2014 01 11 01 04 Let s look at trees Chrispy Can t see the forest Why don t we just outsource our planting to the sub continent who can do it for 0 75 a tree Then we just buy back carbon permits and problem solved They like work we like carbon welfare And for crying out load only the endangered lungfish needs oxygen that s why we don t build dams in Queensland Oxygen just falls from a mask above your head when you re feeling stoned But how would some tree planting help It takes 20 years to grow 20 lone pines to a state where they could replenish the oxygen output of third world forest giant than can be felled in 20 minutes Seems Carbon Neutral should consider re branding Carbon Negative Your math may stand scrutiny but you wouldn t buy in I m all for taxing imported carbon credits as far as I know they don t come under the FTA Why bother softening an ill constructed political swipe with But I suppose some tree planting would help I m in the process of writing to Tony to recommend free issue of window planter boxes to grow marajoram a super herb that converts CO2 to O2 on a square root basis John Holmes Sun 2014 01 12 22 01 Re Trees just have a look at the billion tree project of the late 80 s and 90 s Got asked the other day what to do about tree seedlings creating eucalyptus flavored wheat They came seed from trees planted by farmers to make wind breaks during that project Direct seeding is a logical solution Fair bit of knowledge out there just needs some good extension personal to lead the charge from behind You must leave the ownership of such a project with the land manager We can always use extra information so it needs backing up with some R D Do not expect private industry to do this as it is not possible to capture the value This is public good work Ken Mortensen Fri 2014 01 10 23 04 Ben This seems to be a peer review recommending a peer review of burying carbon We know it s not going to happen not to the tune of 65 anyway Now being a bone fide scientist my bad go tell a climate scientist why the Ord River Scheme shouldn t be expanded if their predictions that the rain in northern drain is going to increase due to climate change If we plough legumes into cane farms to improve the nitrogen content shouldn t we plough cow farts into the soil Tell em what soil s good for not bad for sue Thompson Sat 2014 01 11 18 54 I have read over the Regenerate Australia

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/10/science-environment/soil-carbon-troppo-dream (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ben Rose | Business Spectator
    to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Ben Rose A soil carbon troppo dream An Australian think tank headed by retired military types including a former Howard government governor general has offered an alluring vision for the Coalition irrigate the north and solve carbon emissions Pity it won t work by Ben Rose 10 03am January 10 20 comments CLIMATE SPECTATOR Abbott s abatement black hole The Coalition has a massive budget black hole from its Direct Action climate change policy The entire costings hinge on estimates of abatement from soil carbon that are woefully researched by Ben Rose 10 51am September 14 Abbott s budget and abatement black hole The Coalition has a massive budget and or carbon abatement black hole from its Direct Action climate change policy The entire costings for the policy hinge on estimates of abatement from soil carbon that are woefully researched by Ben Rose 10 38am September 14 CLIMATE SPECTATOR The Coalition s carbon illusion There is good reason the Coalition has been scant on details regarding its Direct Action plan it is constructed on the premise of bogus soil carbon offsets by Ben Rose 11 23am March 27 1 comment Greg Hunt s carbon illusion There is good reason the Coalition has been scant on details regarding its Direct Action plan it is constructed on the premise of bogus soil carbon offsets by Ben Rose 10 26am March 27 A soil carbon troppo dream An Australian think tank headed by retired military types including a former Howard government governor general has offered an alluring vision for the Coalition irrigate the north and solve carbon emissions Pity it won t work by Ben Rose 10 03am January 10 20 comments CLIMATE SPECTATOR Abbott s abatement black hole The Coalition has a massive budget black hole from its Direct Action climate change policy The entire costings hinge on estimates of abatement from soil carbon that are woefully researched by Ben Rose 10 51am

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/ben-rose (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Ben Shepherd | Business Spectator
    flaws have emerged in the industry s business model Only the most cashed up ventures will survive the competition by Ben Shepherd 2 10pm November 27 2 comments Just the ticket for Nine As margins from its TV business shrink Nine has an opportunity if it moves quickly to secure a live entertainment business unmatched in Australia and difficult to duplicate by Ben Shepherd 7 12am November 20 Wake Up Ten it s time to diversify Australia s increasingly two tiered programming will make rebuilding Ten s fortunes even harder for Hamish McLennan And anyone expecting a breakfast show to turn around a network is fooling themselves by Ben Shepherd 2 24pm November 14 Profit hopes and hype feather Twitter s nest Facebook stocks recovered from their debut fizzle and LinkedIn now sits just under five times its IPO price It s hard to tell whether Twitter will follow in the long term by Ben Shepherd 11 29am November 08 1 comment Lighting a fire under Freelancer Evaluating Freelancer s revenue can be complicated but it s not hard to see the listed business turning 50 million in annual profit within five to seven years by Ben Shepherd 5 59pm November 01 1 comment Pop the fizz for Facebook s figures As Facebook beds down its online advertising dominance cost control and rising revenue per user have delivered a stunning set of third quarter numbers by Ben Shepherd 1 39pm October 31 Band power thrives in the live music model Despite the digitisation of the music industry live music continues to thrive as the economics of touring stack the odds heavily in favour of the artist by Ben Shepherd 5 24pm October 25 1 comment APN coasts the radio waves A smaller outdoor format and the healthy performance of APN Media s radio business backdrop the market s love affair with the company by Ben Shepherd 12 24pm October 24 Fairfax chops and changes into the future Many have accused Fairfax of shrinking from hard decisions but this week saw the company undergo a significant structural revamp to ensure its future by Ben Shepherd 5 48pm October 18 3 comments Ten get with the programming Full year loss notwithstanding Ten Network s growing audience and reduced debt leave it stronger going into 2014 But it will take an exceptional programming hit to catch up to its rivals by Ben Shepherd 11 04am October 18 2 comments Page 1 Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete by Ben Shepherd 9 45am January 10 1 comment Google s obey or perish rules of the internet When a fast growing and heavily backed lyrics website ran afoul of Google it effectively fell off the internet The 60 per cent drop in traffic was a chilly reminder of Google s power by Ben

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/ben-shepherd (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Negative spin: Europe's amazing electricity prices | Business Spectator
    Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters North Europe s devastating storms sent wind turbines spinning and helped strengthen a new winter phenomenon for the region negative electricity prices Damaging for utilities losing money making electricity delighting traders who cash in on price swings they will not however mean cheap power for households A raft of elements to subsidise the green energy boom make up half of most consumer power bills shielding them from immediate wholesale market price swings Over the Christmas holiday which typically causes a drop in energy demand wholesale electricity prices in Germany the Nordic region the Czech Republic and Slovakia turned negative on excessive renewable energy production and mild weather Wind and rain bring out the best in renewable energy from turbines and hydro power a major source of Nordic electricity Calm weather hampers green energy output Meteorologists say mild and wet weather could continue until March When renewable energy output is higher than necessary as in stormy weather producers face negative market prices because electricity cannot be stored in high volumes I think negative prices will become more common with more wind farms being built With more wind farms the chances of having supply outstripping demand are higher and this is the cause of the negative prices said one European power trader Power producers with a diverse plant portfolio are able to lower output from other stations such as gas fired plants to alleviate the impact of high renewable energy production Utilities will learn from negative prices and will maximise their flexibility options so they don t lose money a central European power trader said Utilities in Germany including RWE and E ON EnBW and Vattenfall are able to deal with short term swings in power prices but they have been hit hard by the overall drop in wholesale prices due to renewable energy growth German influence In Germany Europe s largest renewable power producer negative prices have appeared more often in recent years mainly because its renewable energy law requires that green power must be given priority on the network even when supply outstrips demand German wind power output in December was the second highest monthly generation figure ever statistics from Muenster based renewable energy research institute IWR showed Berlin s strategy is to build many more renewable energy projects to help wean it off nuclear plants some of which it shut down following Japan s Fukushima disaster Renewable power capacity and output has also grown elsewhere especially in northern Europe as governments support green energy growth through generous subsidy regimes in a bid to lower carbon emissions Germany s role as a benchmark electricity market in the region and its growing power links to

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/10/energy-markets/negative-spin-europes-amazing-electricity-prices (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Karolin Schaps & Vera Eckert | Business Spectator
    markets Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Karolin Schaps Vera Eckert Negative spin Europe s amazing electricity prices Europe s fierce storms have sent wind turbines wild pumping power into the continent s grid and driving electricity prices into negative territory by Karolin Schaps Vera Eckert 9 12am January 10 5 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Harnessing the power of the one man brand Ken Phillips 10 Jan 1 58 PM

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/karolin-schaps-vera-eckert (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • A fast to follow the spending binge? | Business Spectator
    welcome and indicates that low interest rates are doing their bit but we shouldn t place too much weight on it the bigger challenge is still to come Print this page A fast to follow the spending binge Callam Pickering 9 Jan 2 56 PM 13 Economics and Investment Strategy Economy Industries Retail Economy Australian News More from Callam Pickering 10 Jan Dwelling on housing growth is misguided 10 Jan The ECB is failing to do whatever it takes 09 Jan Tinker taper the Fed s cautious path 31 Dec Bursting Bitcoin s bubble 27 Dec The American consumer is back Related articles 12 Jan Obama picks Fed vice chair 11 Jan US jobs growth slows sharply 10 Jan Korea China jostle for Aust resources 10 Jan China trade balance contracts 10 Jan New home sales lift in November More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Log in to post comments Comments Now all we have to do is get Submitted by Ken not available on Thu 2014 01 09 15 16 Now all we have to do is get the AUD back to bellow 85c and we might see exports replacing imports Log in to post comments Ken Submitted by Keyser Söze on Thu 2014 01 09 16 52 Ken You might just get your wish on the AUD probably go even lower still As for exports replacing imports well that s another matter altogether KS Log in to post comments Keyser you said I might get Submitted by Ken not available on Fri 2014 01 10 13 02 Keyser you said I might get my wish and my wish is to create jobs that create exports Log in to post comments Hang on a minute Ken Submitted by Colin Barsby on Thu 2014 01 09 23 34 Hang on a minute Ken Can you export parcels I thought we just sold them to each other Log in to post comments Colin it s just like time Submitted by Ken not available on Fri 2014 01 10 13 10 Colin it s just like time share You don t actually own anything but I charge you a fee and allow you to think that you own something If you want to really make money then you have a bi lateral trade agreement with China We pay an annual fee to China and they allow us to think that we own Australia then they send us TV sets and we can watch our country on TV Sheesh and you thought making money was hard Log in to post comments Not to mention that other Submitted by Simbo on Thu 2014 01 09 15 41 Not to mention that other known unknown how much fiscal drag will be induced by impending federal and state deficit reduction measures Log in to post comments If growth is the objective Submitted by Keyser Söze on Thu 2014 01

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/9/economy/fast-follow-spending-binge (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Dr. Stephen J. Nash | Business Spectator
    Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Dr Stephen J Nash Complacency is no super strategy Choosing which asset is best for your portfolio is more crucial than ever as quantitative easing has made bubbles out of all markets Grab the chance to change your strategy now while real interest rates relative to inflation remain high by Dr Stephen J Nash 2 30pm January 09 19 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Harnessing the power of the one man brand

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/dr-stephen-j-nash (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •