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  • Digital carjacking: Security flaws in autos | Business Spectator
    Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Car hacking is not a new field but its secrets have long been closely guarded That is about to change thanks to two well known computer software hackers who got bored finding bugs in software from Microsoft and Apple Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek say they will publish detailed blueprints of techniques for attacking critical systems in the Toyota Prius and Ford Escape in a 100 page white paper following several months of research they conducted with a grant from the US government The two white hats hackers who try to uncover software vulnerabilities before criminals can exploit them will also release the software they built for hacking the cars at the Def Con hacking convention in Las Vegas this week They said they devised ways to force a Toyota Prius to brake suddenly at 80 miles an hour jerk its steering wheel or accelerate the engine They also say they can disable the brakes of a Ford Escape traveling at very slow speeds so that the car keeps moving no matter how hard the driver presses the pedal Imagine what would happen if you were near a crowd said Valasek director of security intelligence at consulting firm IOActive known for finding bugs in Microsoft Corp s Windows software Just how bad is this But it is not as scary as it may sound at first blush They were sitting inside the cars using laptops connected directly to the vehicles computer networks when they did their work So they will not be providing information on how to hack remotely into a car network which is what would typically be needed to launch a real world attack The two say they hope the data they publish will encourage other white hat hackers to uncover more security flaws in autos so they can be fixed I trust the eyes of 100 security researchers more than the eyes that are in Ford and Toyota said Miller a Twitter security engineer known for his research on hacking Apple Inc s App Store Toyota Motor Corp spokesman John Hanson said the company was reviewing the work He said the carmaker had invested heavily in electronic security but that bugs remained as they do in cars of other manufacturers It s entirely possible to do Hanson said referring to the newly exposed hacks Absolutely we take it seriously Ford Motor Co spokesman Craig Daitch said the company takes seriously the electronic security of its vehicles He said the fact that Miller s and Valasek s hacking methods required them to be inside the vehicle they were trying to manipulate mitigated the risk This particular attack was not performed remotely over the air but as a highly aggressive direct physical manipulation of one vehicle over an elongated period of time which would not be a risk to customers and any mass level

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/7/29/technology/digital-carjacking-security-flaws-autos (2014-01-12)
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  • Jim Finkle - Reuters | Business Spectator
    to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Jim Finkle Reuters The emerging fake fan economy Why work on generating buzz on social networks when you can buy it Fake likes are booming across social media pages but cyber criminals appear to be the clear winners from this trend by Jim Finkle Reuters 9 53am August 19 Digital carjacking Security flaws in autos The secrets of breaking and entering into a car s critical systems have so far been a closely guarded secret but that s about to change as a couple of hackers get ready to reveal the blueprints by Jim Finkle Reuters 10 56am July 29 2 comments Beware the irrational hacker While the prospect of an all out cyber war between nations is unlikely it s the nebulous collective of hacktivists extremists and rogue states that has the White House worried by Jim Finkle Reuters 10 42am May 23 Economic reality check for tech giants The current doom and gloom in the global economy is making life tough for everybody including some of the biggest names in the tech industry Microsoft IBM and Intel are all set to post depressing numbers next week with Apple the one notable exception by Jim Finkle Reuters 10 40am July 11 Ending Oracle s blame game The world s third largest software maker is running out of excuses as analysts question the merit of its US5 6 billion purchase of Sun Microsystems by Jim Finkle Reuters 9 34am March 19 The emerging fake fan economy Why work on generating buzz on social networks when you can buy it Fake likes are booming across social media pages but cyber criminals appear to be the clear winners from this trend by Jim Finkle Reuters 9 53am August 19 Digital carjacking Security flaws in autos The secrets of breaking and entering into a car s critical systems have so far been a closely guarded secret but that s about to change as a

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/jim-finkle-reuters (2014-01-12)
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  • Small business lags on computer security | Business Spectator
    into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Small business lags on computer security 7 Feb 2012 10 46 AM Technology Wireless Security Security Small businesses have embraced the internet but 16 per cent don t use anti virus software and 30 per cent don t use a protective firewall a new study shows You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AAP Small businesses have embraced the internet but 16 per cent don t use anti virus software and 30 per cent don t use a protective firewall a new study shows That leaves them at risk from an extensive and increasing number of internet threats the Australian Institute of Criminology AIC says Releasing the study for Safe Internet Day Attorney General Nicola Roxon said most small businesses could not function without the internet So it s important small businesses can identify threats and can put in place measures to protect themselves and their customers she said in a statement on Tuesday Home Affairs Minister Jason Clare said small business comprised about 95 per cent of all Australian businesses contributing about 34 per cent of private industry value to the economy Cyber attacks can stop a small business being productive and this can have wider economic implications for the country he said in a statement The survey the Australian Business Assessment of Computer Use Security ABACUS included 3290 small business respondents with 14 per cent reporting one or more security incidents in the period 2006 07 Seventy five per cent of those who experienced security incidents reported adverse consequences including

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2012/2/7/technology/small-business-lags-computer-security (2014-01-12)
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  • Symantec sued over 'scareware' | Business Spectator
    stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Symantec sued over scareware 11 Jan 2012 1 43 PM Technology Wireless Security Security ReutersA lawsuit filed against Symantec Corp claims that the software maker seeks to persuade consumers to buy its products by scaring them with misleading information about the health of their computers You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Reuters A lawsuit filed against Symantec Corp claims that the software maker seeks to persuade consumers to buy its products by scaring them with misleading information about the health of their computers James Gross a resident of the state of Washington filed the suit in District Court in San Jose California on Tuesday according to his attorneys A copy of the complaint provided to Reuters by Mr Gross s attorneys alleges that Symantec distributes trial versions of its products that scan a consumer s system then invariably report that harmful errors privacy risks and other problems exists on the PC regardless of the real condition of the machine A Symantec representative could not immediately comment on the lawsuit which seeks class action status The company uses that scanning software to market Norton Utilities PC Tools Registry Mechanic and PC Tools Performance Toolkit software according to the complaint Norton Utilities and PC Tools are products that Symantec says help improve the performance of PCs and keep online activities private The software is falsely informing the consumer that errors are high priority and in addition it is falsely informing the consumer that their overall system health and privacy health is low said Chandler Givens an attorney with Edelson McGuire LLP the firm that filed the suit on behalf of Gross He said that his firm tested other Symantec products but was only able to find problems with

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2012/1/11/technology/symantec-sued-over-scareware (2014-01-12)
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  • The mobile malware myth | Business Spectator
    an explosion the overall volume of mobile threats has remained pretty low compared to computer based threats That could change quickly as mobile technology gets more sophisticated You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password A new mobile security threat emerged this week as cybercriminals targeted users of the popular Netflix application for Android The malware dubbed Android Fakeneflic masquerades as the legitimate Netflix application and tricks users into downloading the app and entering their Netflix account details However once revealed this information is captured by scammers who will look to exploit it for financial gain The Netflix scam is one of many recent security threats targeting the popular Android platform In fact cybercriminals have been targeting mobile devices for many years and the security industry has predicted an explosion in mobile malware for the last decade The numbers indicate that there has been a marked increase in threats targeting mobile devices a global rise of 42 per cent in 2010 However despite this rise the overall volume of mobile threats remains low compared to computer based threats and it is not accurate to say the anticipated explosion has occurred A trickle of mobile malware To explain why only a trickle of mobile malware has emerged we need to explore the factors that will drive widespread security threats These constitute an open platform a ubiquitous platform and attacker motivation The open platform element has been fulfilled with the advent of Android This platform also delivers when it comes to ubiquity Android is now the most prolific smart phone operating system holding 43 per cent of worldwide smart phone market What is currently missing is element three a motivating factor for scammers When it comes to cybercrime motivation tends to be financial The vast majority of cybercriminals are looking to drive revenue with the top earners bringing in thousands of dollars per week However scammers are still exploring how mobile devices can be exploited for financial gain with current mobile threats holding a low revenue per infection ratio and not delivering financial returns This is most likely why none of the Android attacks we have seen to date have been repeated How will cybercriminals monetise mobile attacks The primary motivation for PC malware is the theft of information such as login credentials and financial data The sale of this information has proven lucrative for cybercriminals who will be looking to replicate this model in the mobile space The tactics we can expect them to employ will include the targeting of new mobile payment technologies as well as replication of effective computer based scams Advances in mobile payment technology will open the

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2011/10/31/technology/mobile-malware-myth (2014-01-12)
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  • Craig Scroggie | Business Spectator
    One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Craig Scroggie Pinterest pastime for cybercriminals The latest social media darling is squarely in the sights of cybercriminals who are already exploiting Pinterest users by posting images and links to fraudulent survey scams by Craig Scroggie 10 53am March 16 Plugging the mobile data leaks The rapid adoption of smart devices in the workplace is giving CIO s sleepless nights and the problem isn t malware but data leakage by Craig Scroggie 8 58am December 21 The mobile malware myth Despite fears of an explosion the overall volume of mobile threats has remained pretty low compared to computer based threats That could change quickly as mobile technology gets more sophisticated by Craig Scroggie 8 41am November 01 Pinterest pastime for cybercriminals The latest social media darling is squarely in the sights of cybercriminals who are already exploiting Pinterest users by posting images and links to fraudulent survey scams by Craig Scroggie 10 53am March 16 Plugging the mobile data leaks The rapid adoption of smart devices in the workplace is giving CIO s sleepless nights and the problem isn t malware but data leakage by Craig Scroggie 8 58am December 21 The mobile malware myth Despite fears of

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/craig-scroggie (2014-01-12)
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  • Beware of smartphone snoopers | Business Spectator
    Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password A team of researchers at Georgia Tech have demonstrated how they were able to spy on what was typed on a regular desktop computer s keyboard via the accelerometers of a smartphone placed nearby Normally when security researchers describe spyware on smartphones they mean malicious code that can be used to snoop on calls or to steal the data held on mobile phones In this case however researchers have described how they have put software on smartphones to spy on activity outside the phone itself specifically to track what a user might be doing on a regular desktop keyboard nearby Cloak and dagger It sounds like the stuff of James Bond but the researchers paint a scenario where a criminal could plant a smartphone on the desk close to their target s keyboard and use specialist software to analyse vibrations and snoop on what was being typed It s a quite beautiful twist on how bad guys could use microphones to hear keystrokes and spy on your passwords Patrick Traynor an assistant professor in Georgia Tech s School of Computer Science admits that the technique is difficult to accomplish reliably but claims that the accelerometers built into modern smartphones can sense keyboard vibrations and decipher complete sentences with up to 80 per cent accuracy We first tried our experiments with an iPhone 3GS and the results were difficult to read Traynor says But then we tried an iPhone 4 which has an added gyroscope to clean up the accelerometer noise and the results were much better We believe that most smartphones made in the past two years are sophisticated enough to launch this attack Indeed a photograph of the researcher shows him posing with what appears to be an Android smartphone What s quite interesting to those of a geeky mindset is the technique adopted by the university researchers to build up their cache of stolen data It turns out that is largely based on probability Presently the spyware cannot determine the pressing of individual keys through the iPhone s accelerometer but pairs of keystrokes instead The software determines whether the keys are on the right or left hand side of a standard QWERTY keyboard and then whether the pair of keys is close together or far apart With the characteristics of each pair of keystrokes collected it compares the results against a dictionary where each word has been assigned similar measurements For example take the word canoe which when typed breaks down into four keystroke pairs C A A N N O and O E Those pairs then translate into the detection system s code as follows Left Left Near Left Right Far Right Right Far and Right Left Far or LLN LRF RRF RLF This code is then compared to the preloaded dictionary and yields canoe as the statistically probable typed word For understandable reasons the technique is said to only work reliably

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2011/10/21/technology/beware-smartphone-snoopers (2014-01-12)
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  • An almost perfect productivity push | Business Spectator
    yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password A few years ago we were using separate mobile devices to fulfill different functions one for making calls another for email and another for browsing the web to watch videos In many workplaces today we re now seeing iPads Androids iPhones and other mobile platforms being integrated into the workplace with corporate services expected to be available on any device According to Apple s chief operating officer 65 per cent of Fortune 100 firms were already deploying the iPad or piloting projects and many analyst firms are predicting an explosion of tablet devices in the enterprise in 2011 The consumerisation of IT is all about productivity many people now find that their home based IT equipment and services are both more capable and less expensive than what is provided in their workplace In many cases employers see the benefits of these consumer devices in the work place but are still highly concerned about protecting confidential corporate data Those who aren t should be But the increased productivity is not without cost While 60 per cent of respondents in a recent McAfee based survey conducted by Evalueserve believed that all their employees understood their mobile device access permissions in the workplace less than 20 per cent are actually aware of their company s mobile security policy According to Ovum and the European Association for e Identity and Security EEMA 70 per cent of employees say they are allowed to use their corporate devices for personal activities and 48 per cent say they can use their personally owned mobile devices to connect to corporate systems But giving employees unfettered access to valuable company data on whatever device they happen to prefer is a risky proposition The fact that these devices are mobile means that they re also easily lost or stolen which means that the data they contain is more vulnerable to theft or accidental loss Finally because the vast majority of consumer mobile devices have little to no security including protection against malware enabling access through these unsecured devices can open a gaping hole in a company s otherwise secure network These risks have led many organisations to firmly resist consumerisation The result of the consumerisation of IT trend is that the boundaries of a company s information network are not as clearly defined as in the past It used to be that a company s information network ended at its firewall and its valuable data remained relatively secure within that network But today data is no longer contained within the walls of your business and the network ends with the user and the user s device mobile phone laptop and home computer In this

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2011/7/5/technology/almost-perfect-productivity-push (2014-01-12)
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