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  • Google removes privacy features from Android OS | Business Spectator
    Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Google removes privacy features from Android OS Reuters 16 Dec 2013 8 23 AM Technology Security Users must now provide personal information to use particular apps You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Google Inc has removed an experimental privacy feature from its Android mobile software that had allowed users to block apps from collecting personal information such as address book data and a user s location The change means that owners of smartphones using Android 4 4 2 the latest version of the world s most popular operating system for mobile devices released this week must provide access to their personal data in order to use certain apps A company spokesman said the feature had been included by accident in Android 4 3 the version released last summer We are suspicious of this explanation and do not think that it in any way justifies removing the feature rather than improving it said Peter Eckersley technology projects director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation The digital rights website first publicised the change in a blog post on Friday Android users who wish to retain the privacy controls by not upgrading to Android 4 4 2 could be vulnerable to security risks Eckersley said For the time being users will need to choose between either privacy or security on the Android devices but not both Many third party apps for Android devices such as music identifying service Shazam and popular smartphone flashlight apps require access to personal information that does not always have an obvious connection to the app s functionality such as phone call information and location data The privacy feature allowed users to pick and choose which personal

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/16/technology/google-removes-privacy-features-android-os (2014-01-12)
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  • Lawsuit accuses IBM of hiding China risks amid NSA scandal | Business Spectator
    Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Lawsuit accuses IBM of hiding China risks amid NSA scandal Reuters 13 Dec 2013 11 16 AM Technology Security Tech Titans Accused of concealing information that saw its market value plunge more than US12 billion You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password IBM Corp has been sued by a shareholder who accused it of concealing how its ties to what became a major US spying scandal reduced business in China and ultimately caused its market value to plunge more than US12 billion IBM lobbied Congress hard to pass a law letting it share personal data of customers in China and elsewhere with the US National Security Agency in a bid to protect its intellectual property rights according to a complaint filed in the US District Court in Manhattan The plaintiff in the complaint Louisiana Sheriffs Pension Relief Fund said this threatened IBM hardware sales in China particularly given a program known as Prism that let the NSA spy on that country through technology companies such as IBM The Baton Rouge pension fund said the revelation of Prism and related disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden caused Chinese businesses and China s government to abruptly cut ties with the world s largest technology services provider It said this led IBM on October 16 to post disappointing third quarter results including drops in China of 22 per cent in sales and 40 per cent in hardware sales While quarterly profit rose 6 percent revenue dropped 4 per cent and fell well below analyst forecasts IBM shares fell 6 4 per cent on October 17 wiping out US12 9 billion of the Armonk New York

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/13/technology/lawsuit-accuses-ibm-hiding-china-risks-amid-nsa-scandal (2014-01-12)
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  • M2M advancements to take online privacy debate to a whole new level: Deloitte | Business Spectator
    took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu M2M advancements to take online privacy debate to a whole new level Deloitte Harrison Polites 11 Dec 2013 12 04 PM Technology Emerging Tech Security Telecommunication Protecting privacy may could possibly lead to shortened life span analyst contends You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password The rise of machine to machine M2M technology is set to drive online privacy debate to new heights forcing consumers to consider whether information that was once well and truly private would be more useful in the public domain Talking at a briefing ahead of Deloitte s 2014 predictions a global panel of analysts from the firm outlined several key issues that will likely emerge as a result of this new trend US based Technology Media and Telecommunications TMT lead analyst Eric Openshaw said that as the M2M trend continues users will have to decide whether protecting their data will be worth missing out on the opportunities provided by further advancements in technology He used the example of health monitoring and health data He said that if shared into a public cloud continuous data on a user s health and wellbeing from wearable and embedded technologies can be used to detect and prevent illness and disease before they strike a person down This type of ongoing maintenance using monitoring technology is already being implemented with machinery components like jet engines Openshaw says that if it s harnessed correctly such an advancement could extend the human life span The only catch is that users have to forgo privacy on their own health and wellbeing in order to reap maximum benefits from this hypothetical system And if introduced Openshaw added that insurance companies and other firms with an interest in your health would likely have access to the same pool of data and make decisions based upon your

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/11/technology/m2m-advancements-take-online-privacy-debate-whole-new-level-deloitte (2014-01-12)
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  • Context is everything in security | Business Spectator
    Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Context is everything in security Ammar Hindi 11 Dec 2013 9 15 AM Technology Security As computing environments become more complex organisations can no longer rely on first generation solutions for adequate protection You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password In security context and data is everything If you don t know the context of a security event and don t have the data available to analyse that event how can you know how important it is Context aware security is about making use of additional information to improve security decisions at the time the decision is made By doing this it ensures that more accurate security decisions are taken to provide better protection against advanced threats One example that can highlight the importance of context awareness is if a bank receives an online banking request from a regular customer to move money from one account to another The customer has logged onto the online banking site and has correctly used her password and credentials All would seem right with the world But hold on a minute what if the bank was able to determine that their online customer is using a different computer from normal She is accessing the online banking site during what would be the small hours in the country where she lives and indeed it appears the computer she is using is located several thousand miles away from where she carried out her last online transaction just a few hours ago Suddenly the context and the data the bank has available has changed the whole picture from an apparently innocent transaction to one which most likely was a fraudulent one They have the context and information to decide to block the transaction until more information can be sought It seems simple but it s surprising to see how many businesses purchase tactical static security solutions to solve a problem at a point in time But they do not think of the dynamic nature of their environment or the threat rendering these tactical purchases useless over time It s like the boy with his thumb in the dyke to stop it bursting Today s IT organisations need a dynamic approach to defending the network one that uses awareness and automation to provide visibility and context while constantly adapting to new threats new vulnerabilities and everyday network changes Staying ahead of the bad guys When it comes to IT security context awareness is critical to staying ahead of the bad guys The rate of change in today s IT environments the number

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/11/technology/context-everything-security (2014-01-12)
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  • Ammar Hindi | Business Spectator
    s ill fated expansion into the US Given its history of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Ammar Hindi Context is everything in security As computing environments become more complex organisations can no longer rely on first generation solutions for adequate protection by Ammar Hindi 9 15am December 11 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Scoreboard Dollar bounce Adam Carr 44

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/ammar-hindi (2014-01-12)
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  • Chinese hackers spied on European ministers before G20: researcher | Business Spectator
    Dec 2013 8 13 AM Technology Security Used malware to gain access to their computers You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Chinese hackers eavesdropped on the computers of five European foreign ministries before last September s G20 Summit which was dominated by the Syrian crisis according to research by computer security firm FireEye Inc The hackers infiltrated the ministries computer networks by sending emails to staff containing tainted files with titles such as US military options in Syria said FireEye which sells virus fighting technology to companies When recipients opened these documents they loaded malicious code on to their personal computers For about a week in late August California based FireEye said its researchers were able to monitor the inner workings of the main computer server used by the hackers to conduct their reconnaissance and move across compromised systems FireEye lost access to the hackers after they moved to another server shortly before the G20 Summit in St Petersburg Russia FireEye said it believes the hackers were preparing to start stealing data just as the researchers lost access The US company declined to identify the nations whose ministries were hacked although it said they were all members of the European Union FireEye said it reported the attacks to the victims through the Federal Bureau of Investigation A spokeswoman for the FBI Jenny Shearer declined to comment The theme of the attacks was US military intervention in Syria said FireEye researcher Nart Villeneuve one of six researchers who prepared the report That seems to indicate something more than intellectual property theft The intent was to target those involved with the G20 The September 5 6 G20 summit was dominated by discussion of the Syrian crisis with some European leaders putting pressure on U S President Barack Obama to hold off on taking military action against Syrian President Bashar al Assad Villeneuve said he was confident that the hackers were from China based on a variety of technical evidence including the language used on their control server and the machines that they used to test their malicious code Villeneuve said he did not have any evidence however that linked the hackers to the Chinese government All we have is technical data There is no way to determine that from technical data Villeneuve said Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei said China opposed any hacking activities US internet companies are keen on hyping up the so called hacker threat from China but they never obtain irrefutable proof and what so called evidence they do get is widely doubted by experts This is neither professional nor responsible Hong told a daily news

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/11/technology/chinese-hackers-spied-european-ministers-g20-researcher (2014-01-12)
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  • Tech giants want surveillance reform | Business Spectator
    power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Tech giants want surveillance reform 10 Dec 2013 2 58 AM Technology Security Apple Google among those calling for overhaul of US surveillance laws You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password AFP Eight leading United States based technology companies have called on Washington to overhaul its surveillance laws following the revelations from fugitive intelligence leaker Edward Snowden of online eavesdropping Apple Inc Facebook Inc Google Inc Microsoft Corp Twitter Inc Yahoo Inc AOL Inc and LinkedIn Corp wrote an open letter to President Barack Obama and the US Congress calling on Washington to lead the way in a worldwide reform of state sponsored spying We understand that governments have a duty to protect their citizens But this summer s revelations highlighted the urgent need to reform government surveillance practices worldwide the letter said The balance in many countries has tipped too far in favour of the state and away from the rights of the individual rights that are enshrined in our Constitution This undermines the freedoms we all cherish It s time for a change They added We urge the US to take the lead and make reforms that ensure that government surveillance efforts are clearly restricted by law proportionate to the risks transparent and subject to independent oversight The letter ran in full page ads in several newspapers including The New York Times and Washington Post The tech companies may fear that increased security concerns will hurt their own ability to track customers for marketing purposes People won t use technology they don t trust Microsoft s Brad Smith said Governments have put this trust at risk and governments need to help restore it Twitter

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/10/technology/tech-giants-want-surveillance-reform (2014-01-12)
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  • Microsoft leads disruption of the world's largest PC botnet | Business Spectator
    progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Microsoft leads disruption of the world s largest PC botnet Reuters 9 Dec 2013 10 42 AM Technology Security Network of up to 2 million machines busted up by the tech giant You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Microsoft Corp said on Thursday it had disrupted the largest network of compromised personal computers involving some 2 million machines around the world since it stepped up its battle against organised online criminals three years ago The Redmond Wash based software giant filed a lawsuit in Texas and won a judge s order directing Internet service providers to block all traffic to 18 Internet addresses that were used to direct fraudulent activity to the infected machines Law enforcement in many European countries served warrants at the same time seizing servers expected to contain more evidence about the leaders of the ZeroAccess crime ring which was devoted to click fraud Such rings use networks of captive machines known as botnets in complicated schemes that force them to click on ads without the computer owners knowledge The schemes cheat advertisers on search engines including Microsoft s Bing by making them pay for interactions that have no chance of leading to a sale Microsoft said the botnet had been costing advertisers on Bing Google Inc and Yahoo Inc an estimated US2 7 million monthly The coordinated effort marks the eighth time Microsoft has moved against a botnet and a rare instance of it doing serious damage to one that is controlled with a peer to peer mechanism where infected machines give each other instructions instead of relying on a central server that defenders can hunt down and disable But the ZeroAccess botnet still had a weakness The code in the infected machines told them to reach out to one of the 18 numeric Internet addresses for details on which ads to click

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/9/technology/microsoft-leads-disruption-worlds-largest-pc-botnet (2014-01-12)
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