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  • An emerging markets bonanza for Australian IT | Business Spectator
    employing a range of push and pull factors The push comes from governments of emerging economies who realise that broadband infrastructure and internet access are critical for economic development An International Telecommunications Union report in 2012 suggested that a 10 per cent growth in broadband can yield about a one per cent increase in GDP The pull factor arises from the insatiable consumer appetite for content data and network services fuelled by more sophisticated and cheaper smartphone and televisions In a recent report conducted by global law firm Linklaters the emerging markets are expected to provide a 174 per cent increase in broadband connections the majority of which will be mobile and retail revenues for broadband services are set to grow to 193 billion by 2017 an 84 per cent increase on today s revenue These figures paint the picture of an increasingly affluent populace with a strong desire to connect with the rest of the world Content mobility and the Cloud The Australian telecommunications media and technology TMT sector together with complementary sectors such as health and financial services need to bravely enter these emerging markets leveraging expertise built over many years in our own markets In particular Linklaters has identified four TMT related areas in emerging markets that are likely to generate significant economic activity and which Australian companies should seriously consider exploiting They are content mobile banking cloud ICT and mobile health As consumers continue to seek out smart experiences in the most affordable and immediate ways there will be an explosion of demand for content and applications in emerging markets with the biggest opportunities coming from value added services such as messaging apps mobile gaming and mobile music For example app developer LINE generated approximately US30 million in 2012 from the sale of premium emoticons alone As services like LINE expand into emerging markets there will be numerous opportunities to monetise social messaging In emerging markets there are more connected people than banked people The exponential growth in mobile ownership over the last decade combined with limited access to financial services is fuelling rapid growth in mobile financial services across emerging markets Significantly revenue from mobile financial services are expected to rise by more than 3000 per cent in the years to 2017 peaking at nearly US30 billion As no single player can successfully offer the full suite of mobile financial services on their own there will be opportunities for all companies in the mobile financial services food chain mobile network operators payment processors device vendors independent players and financial institutions to play in this space We all know that cloud ICT is revolutionising IT service delivery in developed markets However a lesser known fact is that emerging markets are also seizing these opportunities They are bypassing traditional IT infrastructure by adopting straight to cloud strategies and accessing world class ICT services on par with their developed market counterparts The opportunities for the Australian ICT industry are immense Cloud ICT services spend by customers in emerging

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/30/technology/emerging-markets-bonanza-australian-it (2014-01-12)
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  • Niranjan Arasaratnam | Business Spectator
    numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Niranjan Arasaratnam An emerging markets bonanza for Australian IT China and India s appetite for our resources might be waning but the digital revolution unfolding in the emerging markets provides an undeniable opportunity for Australian telecom media and ICT companies So how do they get a piece of this action by Niranjan Arasaratnam 7 50am August 30 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/niranjan-arasaratnam (2014-01-12)
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  • Australian Customs and Border Protection Services eyes tech overhaul with Telstra, IBM | Business Spectator
    And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Australian Customs and Border Protection Services eyes tech overhaul with Telstra IBM Harrison Polites 28 Aug 2013 11 16 AM Technology Applications Big Data Data Management Telecommunication Telstra scores a 56 million deal while IBM comes in to help the agency use analytics to secure our borders You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Australian Customs and Border Protection Service ACBPS has signed two deals one with Telstra and the other with IBM to give the government department a tech overhaul Telstra has reinforced its existing relationship with the ACBPS signing a five year 56 million deal with the government body The agreement will see Telstra provide the ACBPS with a unified communications and video conferencing service to 5 700 ACBPS staff across the country It will also see the telco take a lead role in securing the company s intranet and internet access as well as handling the communication services for its contact centre Meanwhile the ACBPS has also inked a deal for an undisclosed amount with IBM to improve its analytics capabilities in a bid to further secure Australia s borders As part of the deal the ACBPS will use IBM s technology to analyse data the group

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/8/28/technology/australian-customs-and-border-protection-services-eyes-tech-overhaul (2014-01-12)
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  • Rethinking the BYOA barricades | Business Spectator
    external clouds In other words the BYO revolution has already breached the organisation s barriers IT managers can no longer rely solely on traditional network defences or even policies that focus exclusively on employees to keep their data safe So how can IT professionals address these broad new areas of risk thrown up by BYOA They shouldn t give up on network management within their own domain in fact they should focus on bolstering access control with systems that track where and how users connect to sensitive data But they must also look to new strategies such as collaborating with as a service providers deploying corporate app stores and embracing entirely new working models There may never be a true technological solution to any BYO movement which is why the effective IT manager needs to take on new skills and roles as a mediator between employees third party providers and the business Out in the Cloud First up it s worth stressing that BYOA offers organisations and IT policymakers numerous opportunities if it s managed effectively A BYOA centric strategy will as I ve argued before mitigate many of the challenges posed by BYOD it s far easier to monitor and regulate apps based on how they interface with the corporate network and its assets than it is the devices which house them And the benefits are particularly compelling for industries where mobility is essential which have in fact been constrained by the desktops and laptops of yesteryear s computing hardware Any industry with a large sales force presence including many parts of the IT industry itself particularly resellers and MSPs can garner obvious benefits from more flexible access to applications Others like healthcare finance and even the emergency services sector can gain 24 7 access to the highly technical applications which they require as part of their daily duties The biggest hurdle to grasping these opportunities is the security of the organisation s sensitive data This data thanks to the prevalence of SaaS applications amongst those which employees and more and more businesses themselves typically opt for increasingly resides outside the corporate network s perimeter IT managers have virtually no visibility of how and by whom this data is being accessed or even where it s physically stored Nor do they have a straightforward technical means by which to secure this data In fact the use of corporate data within third party hosted apps renders the traditional corporate network boundary absolutely useless Build Your Own Solution So should IT managers throw their hands up on the BYOA front Quite the opposite they should first concentrate on robust access control strategies within their corporate networks we ll get to the dilemma of external data a little later A set of complementary monitoring tools is essential in this regard while an endpoint focused tool like SolarWinds User Device Tracker can identify devices connecting to data sources and blacklist devices or users who IT believes don t require access it takes deeper

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/26/technology/rethinking-byoa-barricades (2014-01-12)
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  • Creating a ‘digital economy’ super-portfolio | Business Spectator
    the local ICT industry now needs to be handed over in its entirely to the Department of Broadband Communications and the Digital Economy DBCDE The ICT sector has been completely lost inside the Department of Industry s portfolio While much of the policy development for the sector has already quietly migrated to DBCDE it s time to formalise this responsibility And more importantly let s move the Australian Government Information Management Office AGIMO inside the Comms portfolio as well as drop the full portfolio ownership of NICTA onto DBCDE s hands If we have decided as a nation to spend tens of billions of public money on upgrading our national broadband capability as we have regardless of which side gets elected then let s get fair dinkum about leveraging the investment In industry development terms the ICT sector is special and should be treated as special It s a horizontal industry that plays a critical support role across the whole economy If the so called New Economy is to be a national priority it needs to be addressed separately The aim of these moves are straight forward That a digital economy super portfolio be created to elevate the profile of the sector Responsibilities should include taking over the responsibilities for the NBN AGIMO NICTA and all ICT related programs from the department of innovation It would be useful too to have a shared junior minister liaison with the Trade and Education portfolios The natural home for ICT sector industry policy is the DBCDE This is where the deep expertise resides which in combination with the AGIMO policy makers have done some good work The cooperative efforts that have developed excellent work like the National Digital Economy Strategy should be formalised into a single portfolio This Digital First and Cloud strategies open data initiatives the review of employee share schemes all good stuff Driving these initiatives needs powerful voices in cabinet Turning back the clock There are some historical markers worth noting that point to why it s a good idea to bring all ICT issues into a singular portfolio The Howard Government structured industry development for ICT sector within the Comms portfolio At the time the Labor party argued this was misplaced and that ICT should be moved into the industry department in order to give it greater prominence Unfortunately the opposite happened Under the Rudd 1 0 government the IT sector sank without a trace under Industry minister Kim Carr who has rarely never demonstrated any interest in anything that isn t an automobile He has reprised this role as the reinstated Industry minister in Rudd 2 0 Kim Carr is simply not interested AGIMO is slightly more complex but holds enormous potential as a driver of innovation culture Since the departure of Lindsay Tanner in 2010 the federal government has lost much of its mojo in relation to genuine public service innovation in this sector Tanner s Gershon Review was a starting point and the innovation dividends for

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/23/technology/creating-digital-economy-super-portfolio (2014-01-12)
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  • A costly bargain for free email | Business Spectator
    shock to many though agencies such as the US National Security Agency NSA have had this capability for years A recent article in The Guardian highlights the dynamic tension in this debate Consumer Watchdog a US based advocacy group has taken umbrage with Google s admission that the content of Gmail messages are automatically scanned Suits and counter suits are flying back and forth Email providers have given themselves the legal right to scan people s email by including it in their Terms of Service to which people must explicitly agree before they can use the service For example Gmail s privacy policy states We use the information we collect from all of our services to provide maintain protect and improve them to develop new ones and to protect Google and our users We also use this information to offer you tailored content like giving you more relevant search results and ads None of us like to think it s the case but our email has always been scanned not only by Google but almost every other email provider by employers concerned about proprietary leaks and by intelligence agencies too Email providers have no voyeuristic interest in the day to day lives of their users They are using automatic content scanners to weed out spam and to give them the means to place targeted advertisements on your screen the price you pay for this otherwise free service Intelligence agencies are not interested in the the lives of ordinary people either They sift through the torrent of data looking for covert criminal and terrorist activity information that might prevent the flight you are travelling on from blowing up mid air or to apprehend organised criminals Great expectations The central issue in all this is that people have an expectation of privacy online where that privacy has never actually existed The internet is a public place and we should adjust our expectations accordingly If we do not say anything on the internet that we would not say standing on a soapbox at Speakers Corner we have nothing to worry about The question is do people have a moral right to privacy Arguably they do but it is a case of the collective good outweighing people s individual rights at least in terms of preventing terrorist attacks and curbing organised crime So there is a line that must be drawn but no clear place to draw it Case by case we need to weigh up where the interests of the greater good ends and the individual s right to privacy begins A disturbing trend for some is the recent move by Google to cross reference and aggregate data from across its range of services Google Now a mobile app that acts as an intelligent personal assistant combines information from your email and calendar the directions you get from Google Maps and so on Designed to work with or without Google Glass it uses a natural language user interface to answer questions make recommendations

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/21/technology/costly-bargain-free-email (2014-01-12)
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  • David Tuffley | Business Spectator
    Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu David Tuffley A costly bargain for free email The devil is in the detail when it comes to free email services like Gmail While the rage over Google s efforts to scan its users emails is understandable anyone who uses these services should know what they are signing up for by David Tuffley 10 01am August 21 1 comment Using Google to game the stock market Google s search data may be the next big money spinner for investors as powerful data mining toolkits start to provide deeper insights into market behaviour by David Tuffley 10 43am April 29 Questioning Google Glass vision The first batch of the Google Glasses came out last month and was met with a resounding meh from the critics So are they right or are they simply reacting with knee jerk aversion to an emerging paradigm of computing by David Tuffley 10 21am April 09 A costly bargain for free email The devil is in the detail when it comes to free email services like Gmail While the rage over Google s efforts to scan its users emails is understandable anyone who uses these services should know what they are signing up for by David Tuffley 10 01am August 21 1 comment Using Google to game the stock market Google s search data may be the next big money spinner for investors as powerful data

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/david-tuffley (2014-01-12)
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  • IBM to buy anti-virus company Trusteer | Business Spectator
    about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu IBM to buy anti virus company Trusteer Reuters 16 Aug 2013 8 44 AM Technology Applications Big Data Data Management Sources say the computer giant paid up to 1 billion for the company You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password IBM the world s biggest technology services company said on Thursday it has agreed to buy Trusteer a company that helps businesses fight computer viruses and fraud A person familiar with the matter said IBM was paying close to US1 billion for Trusteer making it the company s second largest acquisition of a security company after its 2006 purchase of Internet Security Systems for about US1 3 billion Officials with International Business Machines Corp declined to comment on terms of the agreement to buy Trusteer which has offices in Boston and Tel Aviv Israel IBM said it planned to open a cyber security software lab at Trusteer s offices in Tel Aviv which will employ more than 200 researchers and developers The lab will be in addition to other research and development facilities in Israel Trusteer competes with long established security providers such as Symantec Corp Intel Corp s McAfee division and EMC Corp

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/8/16/ibm-buy-anti-virus-company-trusteer (2014-01-12)
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