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  • Is Australia ready for the Internet of Things? | Business Spectator
    one of the biggest risks arising from the failed National Broadband Network NBN project Australian primary producers and businesses will struggle to implement the technologies their international customers are beginning to demand An illustration of how Australian businesses risks being left behind is the recent Akamai internet connectivity rankings showing the country at languishing at 38th in the world for broadband connections despite the nation being the twelfth richest and one of the most urbanised on the planet What s particularly sobering is that Australia fell six places from the previous year s rankings Akamai s rankings echo a Cisco Systems survey on the adoption of internet technologies earlier this year showing the Australia has more in common with Russia or Brazil than first world high cost economies such as the US Germany or France Government logjams and the digital economy Our failure to efficiently rollout a 21st century communications network courtesy of the risible political ineptitude from both parties is only part of the risk facing the nation An even greater problem is the logjam between levels of government In the United Kingdom London is successfully positioning itself as hub of Europe s emerging digital economy on the back of co operation between industry and all levels of government Gordon Innes CEO of the UK capital s economic development agency London and Partners described the co operation between the city s authorities and the national government We ve been working with the national government over the last three years says Innes I have team members seconded into Number 10 Downing Street and we work hand in glove with the government Such co operation between state and Federal governments in Australia is almost unthinkable and petty disputes such as the NSW Liberal administration trying to charge NBN Co for power pole access hinder national infrastructure projects or co operation on economic initiatives More telling in the UK experience is how governments have worked with the business community and political leaders listening to industry has seen changes implemented that have boosted the British economy There were a number of new policy initiatives that were developed Innes told Business Spectator in an interview in London two weeks ago I think what was great about this was they were developed with the tech businesses So there were monthly meetings at Number Ten with the Prime Minister s digital advisor my team the mayor s advisors and there were a whole range of policy initiatives put in place that the community asked for The UK programs have included R D credits an entrepreneur visa program along with changes to the tax treatments of start up investments and employee share options Many of these UK programs are exactly what Australia s technology small business and start up communities have been lobbying successive Federal governments for with their efforts being largely ignored by both Liberal and Labor administrations The Spanish experience Attracting technology business to boost the local economy hasn t just been the strategy of British governments as Barcelona s deputy mayor Anotoni Vives told Business Spectator the city is looking to revitalise itself from the effects of the global financial crisis Barcelona has to become a city of culture creativity knowledge but mainly fairness and wellbeing said Vives I would love to see my city as a place where people live near where they work I would love to see the city self sufficient in energy and it should be zero emission city That vision is being acted upon in Barcelona with the council rolling out smart city technologies while working with business and the community to attract 21 st century businesses While cities like Singapore Barcelona and London are working on attracting entrepreneurs and global corporations Australia is struggling with building a handful of freeways and failing to upgrade the nation s communications infrastructure Thoughts of meaningful Australian tax reform or programs to encourage local or foreign entrepreneurs are the stuff of pipe dreams To the casual observer the Internet of Things may appear to be a technology issue but our inability to keep pace in this field is really about the failure to invest in the nation s future and the lack of leadership from both the political and business communities In his closing his remarks to the conference keynote in Barcelona Cisco boss Chambers said it takes all of us in this room to have the courage to take risks and we all know that leadership is about taking risks In Australia the lack of business and political leadership in facing the challenges of the 21st century is the biggest risk of all Paul Wallbank attended the Internet of Things conference in Barcelona as a guest of Cisco Systems Travel and accommodation in London was at his own cost Print this page More from Paul Wallbank 03 Dec Turning Internet of Things into a growth engine 03 Oct Can Switkowski save the NBN from a nuclear winter 26 Sep The Coalition s NBN road map 11 Sep What went wrong for Labor s NBN 03 Sep The corporate start up fantasy Related articles 10 Jan ACMA hits Telstra with record fine 10 Jan Google v Facebook Who knows wins 08 Jan Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Telstra to sit on cash report More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Martin Backhouse Mon 2013 11 18 11 38 Australia is backward No argument there In this country it is truly cool to be stupid But not when it comes to making a buck We will accept and adopt the internet if things like we always have accepted technology we will buy it not make it Our role in the global system is as a materials supplier and holiday destination And

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/18/technology/australia-ready-internet-things (2014-01-12)
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  • goCatch to harness analytics in NSW taxi war | Business Spectator
    But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu goCatch to harness analytics in NSW taxi war Harrison Polites 12 Nov 2013 11 19 AM 1 Technology Applications Big Data Emerging Tech Taxi booking service to offer better taxi response times by embracing Big Data You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Taxi booking service goCatch is deploying analytics technology in a bid to accurately route taxis to passengers in the shortest amount of time According to goCatch co founder Andrew Campbell the service will eliminate a situation where passengers are told their cab is on approach when it is actually 30 minutes away The recently launched real time job dispatch system uses an advanced type of coding that applies an intelligent geographic overlay to maps dividing entire cities into thousands of small tiles or portions Campbell explains in a statement An example can be seen in the map below The tiles represent lengths of time These lengths of time vary based on location land configuration and time of day enabling goCatch to accurately dispatch a job to the closest driver Campbell says Dispatch is no longer based solely on the proximity of a taxi to a passenger For instance during peak hour the tiles reconfigure based on congestion and delays Campbell identified the new technology as goCatch s competitive advantage against New South Wales incumbent taxi companies This has been an extremely important step in improving the overall experience for passengers and drivers he said Print this page Related articles

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/12/technology/gocatch-harness-analytics-nsw-taxi-war (2014-01-12)
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  • Dooming public IT projects to failure | Business Spectator
    mark over its ability to deliver the necessary infrastructure One of the biggest problems was that ERG signed contracts with clients around the world to work on similar initiatives at the same time Rather than trying to develop a specific system to take to market globally ERG endeavoured to supply different systems to different customers Why did this happen Probably because ERG wouldn t get paid until each system was operational which put tremendous strain on its financial and technical resources The NSW government abandoned the T Card in 2008 Legal action around the project was settled out of court in 2012 Misaligned expectations And then there is the disconnect between the original expectations of the client and that of the provider The understanding of the complexity of this early stage of a project is the responsibility of both parties Even after so many failed IT projects it is notable that public servants commissioning this kind of work don t spend more time aligning their expectations and the engineering activities in a way found in other complex innovation projects Evidence indicates that clients in this case the government identify a provider they can work with and a product that appears fit for the purpose But providers often drive the implementation without the inclusion of senior IT staff from the government which results in cost overruns and a lack of benefits being delivered One solution would be for contracts to be signed on the basis of business process improvement This would mean that engineering requirements become the specific responsibility of the provider and ensure that the provider diligently understood the requirements pre contract Information systems projects are generally sanctioned either by capital expenditure requests in the public sectors this a budgetary approval process or by strategic initiatives Measuring benefits The ones that support strategic initiatives are usually deemed more successful than the capital expenditure projects engaged for their return on investment This is because the expectation is set against business improvement rather than tangible project by project benefit analysis The major issue with a tangible benefit analysis is that organisations underestimate cost and overestimate return To some extent this is a human failing When this happens a system is doomed to fail to meet expectations Information systems of today have such longevity that identifying returns over time is all but impossible A reduction in cost five years after a system is implemented is difficult to relate to the IT initiative particularly as other projects will be competing for recognition of that improvement A broader recognition of the enduring value of IT would change the emphasis from short term project goals to that of a long term business enabler This in turn would reduce the short term focus on success or failure to the broader implications of innovative technology adoption An information system provider often sees project success as the implementation of IT on time and on budget The client sees the project as a matter of business or process improvement And almost all contracts relate to IT specifics rather than business specifics IT contracts often obscure objectives through technological jargon man hours and deadlines If business objectives and outcomes were better stated in contracts there would be clear and obvious accountability When there is a common understanding of success the more likely are successful outcomes Richard Fulford does not work for consult to own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article and has no relevant affiliations This article was originally published at The Conversation Read the original article Print this page Related articles 10 Jan ACMA hits Telstra with record fine 10 Jan Google v Facebook Who knows wins 08 Jan Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan Telstra to sit on cash report More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Roger Armitage Tue 2013 11 12 12 47 Myki works just fine Why are people still bagging the system Perhaps they haven t used it Andrew lastName Tue 2013 11 12 15 32 I agree that Myki now works but it doesn t take away from the fact that the project management side of things left a lot to be desired There s a saying in project management Scope Cost Schedule Pick 2 Unfortunately the Myki project met none of these running years behind schedule at triple the original budget and with scope being whittled back or not met eg Paper tickets Zoned tram etc It has now become along with the Queensland Health payroll debacle a case study in extremely poor project management governance Kevin Cobley Tue 2013 11 12 12 56 It s Governments use of open ended contracts with rise and fall clauses that s the problem the contract should specify the price if the contractors don t deliver don t pay them Mark Toomey Tue 2013 11 12 13 18 The factors cited by Richard Fulford are part of a broader set of failures that are typically present when IT goes wrong The broader failures can be readily categorised as violating at least one and frequently all of the six principles for good governance of IT set out in the AS ISO 38500 standard on governance of IT AS ISO 38500 was originally developed and published in Australia in 2005 as AS 8015 and subsequently adopted and republished as the ISO standard in 2008 Despite the standard having achieved acclaim in the international marketplace its takeup has been slow Especially slow has been the takeup in Australia and in Australian governments despite numerous failure assessments highlighting that had the standard been applied the failures might have been avoided What is it about organisations that leads them to as it appears put substantial effort into avoiding guidance that

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/12/technology/dooming-public-it-projects-failure (2014-01-12)
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  • Richard Fulford | Business Spectator
    Given its history of disappointment a clean set of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Richard Fulford Dooming public IT projects to failure HealthSMART myki T Card are all high profile public IT fiascos and the troubles start pretty much from the word go by Richard Fulford 9 07am November 12 11 comments Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators Scoreboard Dollar bounce Adam Carr 17 min

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/richard-fulford (2014-01-12)
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  • Let the data be your compass | Business Spectator
    time especially in risk management Many businesses have seen the benefits of predictive analytics for decades and have continued to test the quality of these tools and methodologies However many organisations are understandably a bit paranoid about the quality of their predictive models and the tools to develop them Banks as one example constantly get audited on their results but with predictive analytics continually expanding to support more important decisions scrutiny is warranted in all industries We all know this area comes with some challenges Data about customers has not always been so abundant so big and it s only been recently despite the early rise of predictive analytics in this area that high quality quantitative analysis was properly supported by trends in data warehousing and other data management support functions Another challenge to adoption has been that many have been skeptical about the notion that a lot of decisions about customers can largely be automated often paired with an unwarranted optimism in the alternative the human mind The failings of the human mind The human mind has difficulty grasping and acting on complex non obvious patterns When hundreds of customer attributes are intertwined in highly complex relationships particularly if those relationships are non linear the human brain will either draw a blank or make things up We like simple patterns but the world is not very simple anymore We love to infer for instance that a high income is correlated to a particular kind of behaviour Or that drinking Green Tea prevents disease Simple things But making 150 000 a year in country NSW has a different meaning than that same income for someone living in Sydney s Point Piper Now add a few hundred other dimensions Naïve segmentation can be dangerous Unfortunately that same human brain is not always aware of its limitations and our species is typically way too optimistic about its analytical powers Our brain often gets tricked into seeing a pattern that is simplistic or not really there A human risk adjudicator may correctly perceive that some broker comes with a higher overall bad rate the percentage of loans that default but is unlikely to pick up on the fact that performance is above par for a very specific customer segment A good model would spot and exploit those subtleties Another challenge is seen in human operators across all industries who are often set in their ways especially if the process they use is even somewhat successful As a consequence patterns that seemed to work reasonably well in the past will continue to be used even if performance is dropping Therefore worldly knowledge not captured in the data a factor that potentially supports human judgment can easily work against it Intuition in other words is not only overrated it has a fairly limited shelf life Challenges with predictive models Now that predictive models are widely used the challenge shifts to making sure they are used where and when it matters most It s not enough

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/5/technology/let-data-be-your-compass (2014-01-12)
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  • Luke McCormack | Business Spectator
    be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Luke McCormack Let the data be your compass Predictive analytics can help business processes identify what the right thing to do is Sure a gut instinct can be right sometimes but there s no need to rely solely on intuition by Luke McCormack 9 04am November 05 Turning Big Data into money Big Data is the hottest trend in town but very few businesses have any idea about how to convert their vast silos of data into a tangible competitive advantage by Luke McCormack 11 22am June 12 1 comment Let the data be your compass Predictive analytics can help business processes identify what the right thing to do is Sure a gut instinct can be right sometimes but there s no need to rely solely on intuition by Luke McCormack 9 04am November 05 Turning Big Data into money Big Data is the hottest trend in town but very few businesses have any idea about how to convert their vast silos of data into a tangible competitive advantage by

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/luke-mccormack (2014-01-12)
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  • Consumer crossroads for enterprise IT | Business Spectator
    sort of resume Maritz boasts I prefer to build for the future Maritz says and for now he is focusing his energies on Pivotal which is on a mission to provide a comprehensive next gen enterprise computing platform It s still early days but Pivotal has hit the ground running Since its launch in April this year Pivotal has paid a pretty penny around 65 million for mobile solutions developer Xtreme Labs and last week launched an innovation centre in Singapore Not bad for a company that still calls itself a start up but with over 1300 employees it s a very big and cashed up start up Learning from Google Amazon Pivotal s pitch is that enterprises have plenty to learn from the likes of Google and Amazon especially when it comes to how they look at and use data to drive business process Maritz says that the consumer tech heavyweights unencumbered by legacy have managed to harness data in a far bigger scale to gain faster insight and deploy applications at a rapid pace This is what Maritz wants to bring to enterprises with Pivotal offering cloud big data social and now mobile with the Xtreme Labs acquisition as one total package So just what can this total package Pivotal One deliver for enterprises Simply put it s PaaS platform as a service geared for the development of applications One s that incorporates the Cloud Big Data and just about everything that s yet to emerge as the internet of everything takes hold Maritz is keen to sell this as the third platform one that allows enterprises to leverage off interconnectedness and build applications that can not only crunch a mountain of data but also provide real time analysis Making vendor lock in history The two trends undermining this platform is the data deluge that will be exasperated as the internet of things takes hold and the open source approach that Maritz says is the path forward for the cloud computing era Cloud is the new OS says Maritz and vendor lock in just won t work in an environment where organisations are pining for cheaper more flexible solutions Keeping that in mind Pivotal offers an abstraction layer that offers enterprises a modicum of freedom from one single provider If you go back to what has happened in the computing space it s Linux that survived and it s important to create an open foundation that many in the industry can build upon Maritz says There are many of us who say that this will happen inevitably but there are others who will take the opposite approach and build a proprietary stack of their own But in the long run I think the open approach will win out Pivotal s play is to sit on top of an organisation s cloud layer its data centre layer and provide an open source platform for developers to get cracking on consumer grade applications with a special focus on real time

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/28/technology/consumer-crossroads-enterprise-it (2014-01-12)
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  • Formula One revs up its Big Data engines | Business Spectator
    to evolve at such pace and bring components or products to market at such speed says Gerard Spensley AT T s global accounts director for F1 But in recent years safety concerns and fears it would bankrupt itself have forced the sport to adopt tighter regulations reducing speeds and spending This has shifted emphasis from hardware upgrades to real time tweaks in efficiency and tactics to prise an extra millisecond or two from car and driver To do that teams capture gigabytes of data from more than 100 sensors on each F1 car transmitting it back to the pit or direct to their UK headquarters over high speed cables Once engineers have analyzed the data they feed advice back to the driver often within minutes or even seconds At last year s Brazilian Grand Prix for example the Infiniti Red Bull Racing team s UK factory used AT T s high bandwidth link to assess the impact of an early collision on driver Sebastian Vettel s car in time to send instructions to trackside engineers ahead of the first pit stop That gave them time AT T s Spensley said to make alterations that helped reduce the risk of further damage to the car Vettel finished sixth retaining his title It s this pressure cooker data analytics which some F1 companies say offers an edge not only to racing motor cars but to other industries grappling with big data The appeal lies in how F1 teams tackle grabbing information on the fly figuring out what s important and then converting that quickly into a strategy Complexity Leading the charge is McLaren a racing car company founded in 1963 and now half owned by Bahrain Mumtalakat Holding Co Its applied technologies unit last month set up its Asian headquarters in Singapore McLaren for example has used its experience grabbing data from fast moving cars to help build a network of antennae sensors and masts for San Francisco s Bay Area Rapid Transit BART The network is used to collect video surveillance of the carriages monitor usage and provide passengers with WiFi This is not says McLaren s van Manen as easy as it sounds Data bounces off walls arrives in the wrong order or drops out entirely The complexity is in the detail of dealing with both the high volume of data and the imperfections in the world McLaren is now working on similar projects in Europe To be sure F1 is a small industry and McLaren is being driven in part by circumstance to seek new markets In 2012 the group made a pre tax loss of 2 5 million pounds 4 05 million The global market for big data is expected to be worth 23 7 billion by 2016 most of it driven by big players such as IBM Cisco Systems Inc and EMC Corp forecasts Credit Suisse Brand appeal Not all in the industry are convinced there s much mileage in exporting its expertise There is relevance but

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/10/25/technology/formula-one-revs-its-big-data-engines (2014-01-12)
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