archive-au.com » AU » B » BUSINESSSPECTATOR.COM.AU

Total: 1320

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Fredrik Tunvall | Business Spectator
    will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Fredrik Tunvall Lifting the lid on IBM s Project Neo IBM s promising new project looks to break new ground with data visualisations but its success will rely on how well it distinguishes itself from Cognos Insight by Fredrik Tunvall 7 41am December 05 Microsoft s BI simplification Microsoft has plenty of BI technology in the bag but the patchwork of overlapping tools and applications risks confusing customers The company needs to consolidate its portfolio and start formulating a mobile BI strategy by Fredrik Tunvall 9 46am April 30 Lifting the lid on IBM s Project Neo IBM s promising new project looks to break new ground with data visualisations but its success will rely on how well it distinguishes itself from Cognos Insight by Fredrik Tunvall 7 41am December 05 Microsoft s BI simplification Microsoft has plenty of BI technology in the bag but the patchwork of overlapping tools and applications risks confusing customers The company needs to consolidate its portfolio and start formulating a mobile BI strategy

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/fredrik-tunvall (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Turning Internet of Things into a growth engine | Business Spectator
    have become almost as efficient as they can possibly be with the current technology Riding the next disruption wave Annunziata sees the internet of machines the technologies connecting smart devices in homes and industries as the driver for the next wave of business productivity growth and innovation Most of the case studies of the internet of machines revolve around consumer applications two days earlier at the Dreamforce conference Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff discussed the possibilities of connected toothbrushes and GE itself recently invested US30 million in Quirky a company best known for its smart refrigerator egg rack However Annunziata says the real benefits of the Internet of Things lie beyond consumer products you re applying Big Data into the industrial sectors which are the real drivers for economic growth This enthusiasm about the industrial possibilities of the Internet of Things is shared by Cisco CEO John Chambers who recently described the technologies as the greatest opportunity of my career Like most vendors GE has its own term for these technologies preferring the phrase industrial internet to describe how they see wind turbines locomotives and jet engines being connected If you look at US productivity growth it pretty much doubled in the early 1990s says Annunziata Much of these productivity improvements are attributed to personal computers and the internet being adopted by businesses in that decade After about ten years productivity slowed down again he adds Annunziata reckons the industrial internet could be the next catalyst to put growth back on the agenda Global productivity overdrive Those 1990s productivity gains were not evenly distributed across all economies with the US benefiting the most while Europe lagged Annunziata sees that being due the flexibility of economies and labour markets on the two continents If you re in a situation where you can t move workers around or you can t create new companies that process is going to be slowed down and benefits will accrue at a slower pace Low labour rates though are not what Annunziata sees as being the main driver for increased productivity something he emphasises in his comments about China s adoption of these technologies They are very focused on the objective of moving up the value added ladder because they want to stimulate domestic consumption to have a balanced economy and they understand that stronger domestic consumption requires higher wages which can only be justified by higher productivity He also sees Latin American countries as being other strong adopters of the industrial internet particularly those like Mexico and Brazil where the oil and gas sector is heavily investing in these technologies which highlights the important role of governments in making infrastructure available to industry You do need to have a physical infrastructure of power and data for the industrial internet to deploy its full benefits Annunziata states Jobs of the future This transformation will have an undeniable impact on employment A lot of jobs will have to go but it s important to keep things in perspective At the beginning of last century nearly half the workforce in almost every country was employed in agriculture today it s less than two per cent in developed nations One of the concerns that comes up often with this new wave of innovation focused on big data is the idea that we re moving towards an economy where there will be room only for engineers data scientists and highly specialised individuals Annunziata says The industrial internet will also give rise to new categories of workers we have of course the data scientist but we ll also have a whole range of what we ve labelled mechanical digital engineers who understand both how the actual machines work but also understand the data and the software Governments again have a role in dealing with the effects of a changed industrial landscape There s no doubt whenever you have innovation it is disruptive Annunziata says In Annunziata s view both government and private enterprise have a role to play in retraining and supporting unemployed workers It has to be addressed both at the level of the company and public policy You need to have a safety net that helps people through retraining and unemployment benefits It s still true that the more you move into advanced areas of manufacturing the more you need to have an educated and skilled workforce So you need to make sure your education system gives you a strong pipeline Managing big data Information is power is a truism that Annunziata subscribes to seeing the availability of data as an opportunity for business leaders to re imagine their markets and operations This brings with it a couple of headaches Firstly managers will have to understand the data and their own industries to reorganise their business Then there s the issue of putting the data to good use That will require the skills of individual managers but it will also require the flexibility of the market and the economic system to implement the changes While there will be applications present to understand and absorb the data the multitude of possibilities could actually hinder prompt decision making As an economist the value of information is intuitive concluded Annunziata When we look back in twenty thirty years from now we ll be shocked at how little we knew and used the data so far Paul Wallbank travelled to San Francisco as guest of Salesforce and to Barcelona as a guest of Cisco Systems Print this page More from Paul Wallbank 18 Nov Is Australia ready for the Internet of Things 03 Oct Can Switkowski save the NBN from a nuclear winter 26 Sep The Coalition s NBN road map 11 Sep What went wrong for Labor s NBN 03 Sep The corporate start up fantasy Related articles 10 Jan ACMA hits Telstra with record fine 10 Jan Google v Facebook Who knows wins 08 Jan Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice 08 Jan Australia risks missing tech boom 08 Jan

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/3/technology/turning-internet-things-growth-engine (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Paul Wallbank | Business Spectator
    broadband networks The Coalition will need a standing army of NBN Co subcontractors to make fibre to the node work and this carries similar risks to those of Labor s ill fated insulation scheme by Paul Wallbank 10 34am July 31 29 comments Finding Quigley s successor With the resignation of Mike Quigley the challenge now is to find someone brave enough to pick up the baton as his successor While there s a wide range of candidates it s unlikely any of them would be in a hurry to fill Quigley s position by Paul Wallbank 10 38am July 15 5 comments What awaits Mike Quigley s successor Construction complications low morale and constant interference from Canberra hamper the NBN rollout Should NBN Co replace its CEO there are going to be many tough challenges facing the new leader of this struggling project by Paul Wallbank 9 15am July 11 20 comments The risky business of the cloud Cloud is a game changer for business IT but the Prism scandal is a timely reminder of why understanding and managing the risks inherent in these services is critical for managers and boards by Paul Wallbank 10 24am July 04 Putting IT feuds to bed Ailing PC and server markets are forcing once powerful competitors to bury the hatchet and tackle an increasingly opaque future by Paul Wallbank 8 58am June 27 NBN swims up the Service Stream without a paddle With NBN contractor Service Stream s Syntheo JV purportedly on its last legs the uncertain fate of the company poses a serious headache for NBN Co and the network by Paul Wallbank 10 11am June 25 8 comments Google s loony moonshots Google s pilot program to offer internet access through a network of balloons isn t as crazy as it sounds In fact it s another example of how combining out of the box thinking with a big budget can lead to interesting innovation by Paul Wallbank 10 17am June 18 7 comments Why Australia is losing the digital race The Gillard government s ambitious goal to make Australia a leading digital economy by 2020 requires a fundamental rethink in our approach to hi tech industries and innovation But is it too late to turn the ship around by Paul Wallbank 10 43am June 17 14 comments REVIEW Microsoft Surface Pro Microsoft has at least delivered on its promise of a powerful Windows based tablet and the Surface Pro is a good deal for those who have substantial investments in existing Microsoft technology However shortish battery life and a lack of cellular connectivity are two big deficiencies by Paul Wallbank 9 28am June 11 9 comments ASIC s section 313 spiderweb ASIC s latest mea culpa about shutting down 250 000 sites is another example of how good intentions and actual enforcement don t always go hand in hand by Paul Wallbank 10 18am June 06 1 comment A false path to cyber security The latest scaremongering around Chinese hackers highlights how naïve we are about information security and the strange obsession Australian governments have with secrecy by Paul Wallbank 10 41am May 29 2 comments Reality check for Australian competition Salesforce com s executive vice president and former White House CIO Vivek Kundra has a blunt message for government and business leaders if you are still stuck in old world thinking then you ve already lost the race by Paul Wallbank 10 29am May 28 4 comments BUDGET 2013 A mixed bag for our digital economy The budget hints at good intentions for promoting the Australian tech sector but it still lacks vision and intent in bolstering the country s emerging digital economy by Paul Wallbank 10 06am May 15 Breaking our NBN speed obsession The Coalition s NBN plan may have reignited the NBN debate but by fixating on internet speeds we may be glossing over other important factors that underpin the need for the network by Paul Wallbank 11 57am May 13 47 comments Page 1 Turning Internet of Things into a growth engine The next wave of innovation promises to drive economic growth but the private sector and governments will have to make important investments in infrastructure training and education by Paul Wallbank 6 32am December 03 4 comments Is Australia ready for the Internet of Things While we flounder with our broadband options the global market is getting more connected than ever The inability of our political and business leaders to invest and collaborate could cost us dearly by Paul Wallbank 10 34am November 18 9 comments Can Switkowski save the NBN from a nuclear winter There are plenty of reasons why Switkowski shouldn t get the gig as NBN Co chairman however many of the criticisms levelled against him could turn out to be strengths for the NBN by Paul Wallbank 6 04am October 03 12 comments The Coalition s NBN road map Malcolm Turnbull is sticking with his targets when it comes to the Coalition s expectations of the NBN Surprisingly the message is relatively good news for supporters of the troubled project by Paul Wallbank 6 12am September 26 8 comments What went wrong for Labor s NBN The National Broadband Network could have been a powerful political weapon for Labor But its potency as a vote winner was ultimately stifled by poor management from NBN Co and persistent political interference by Paul Wallbank 11 03am September 11 38 comments The corporate start up fantasy Corporate managers appropriating start up culture is a fascinating feature of today s corporate culture Everyone loves talking about the start up ethos but that s pretty much where the similarities end by Paul Wallbank 10 08am September 03 2 comments Canberra s looming spectrum challenge The failed digital dividend auction now presents a problem for both political parties as the emergency services stake their claim on unused broadcast frequencies by Paul Wallbank 8 23am August 29 1 comment Pink batts and national broadband networks The

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/paul-wallbank (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • What if networks had a user-facing nervous system? | Business Spectator
    Here s that future What if you could tap the user experience to shape and even determine how your network will run Not after the fact but in real time Let s use an analogy to something consumer facing the contact centre In the contact centre world you know that when something goes wrong with a network you are going to hear about it The calls and emails that flood in with complaints mean that the users are the canaries in the coalmine when it comes to performance problems Actually they are more than canaries in coal mines because canaries only warn these calls and emails actually tell you what has gone wrong and frequently what you need to do about it to make things right again The contact centre or at least the very best type of customer service recognises that this feedback needs to shape the business In a sense it s the Lean Startup model You don t worry too much about getting the whole structure right from the beginning You shape it as necessary in response to the input you get and the data you collect from those encountering that structure So let s move to networks What if networks in a sense had a user facing nervous system In other words what if they could feel and adapt to the user s touch This might seem like something they should always have been built like but traditional networks were built and run the other way around They were built to function from the inside overestimating the value of technical data while underestimating the value of user experience data In the old model we measured the pieces the individual servers and links and monitored these pieces independently of each other as IT teams stuck to their individual silos In other words to continue the nervous system analogy a little longer these nervous systems were not only internal they were isolated The thinking was that if the pieces were happy then the application must be okay That s been proven wrong Just because the individual pieces are healthy does not mean that the users are happy In other words it s the service not the servers that we need to look at And that is exactly what is beginning to happen and it is happening very fast There is a major shift underway from monitoring elements toward service monitoring since the services and applications are really the thing you re delivering You re not delivering a Web server or a land link you re delivering an application that crosses dozens of links and maybe hundreds of servers We are talking about applications that from the user s experiential point of view are totally disconnected from the complex infrastructure that supports them People simply don t care about the silos any more than people care about how a television or radio transmission reaches them transmission static equals poor user experience equals failure End of story The new approach

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/2/technology/what-if-networks-had-user-facing-nervous-system (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Damien Murphy and Russ Elsner | Business Spectator
    of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Damien Murphy and Russ Elsner What if networks had a user facing nervous system There is a major shift underway for traditional IT businesses with the focus on technology and machines swiftly giving way to an age of users and applications by Damien Murphy and Russ Elsner 9 25am December 02 1 comment Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/damien-murphy-and-russ-elsner (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Vic Govt's cyber security, data recovery plans roasted in Auditor General report | Business Spectator
    power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Vic Govt s cyber security data recovery plans roasted in Auditor General report Harrison Polites 28 Nov 2013 10 54 AM Technology Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Reports also put the state principal government IT provider CenITex in the cross hairs You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password A series of reports from the Victorian Auditor General s office has found several of the state department s cyber security practices woefully lacking with the finger of blame squarely pointed at the state s principal IT provider CenITex In the preliminary report Auditor General John Doyle noted that cyber security is now a paramount concern for all of government It s of particular worry for the Victorian government given that in 2012 it was revealed to be the victim of 26 separate serious cyber attacks Disappointingly I found that to date there has been inadequate central oversight of the ability of public sector systems to resist cyber attack and the follow up of the status of emerging or known cyber threats Mr Doyle wrote in the report Also there are no cohesive arrangements in place in Victoria to brief ministers if a major cyber threat was to affect the public sector s ability to continue to deliver services Mr Doyle noted that there has been an ongoing effort from the state department and CenITex to patch up its cyber defences adding that many agencies have already patched up the exploits revealed by the Auditor General In a later report released on the same day the Auditor General took aim at CenITex s data recovery capabilities While most portfolio departments have a DRP the effectiveness

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/11/28/technology/vic-govts-cyber-security-data-recovery-plans-roasted-auditor-general (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Technology and taxes: A tough nut to crack | Business Spectator
    Tax GST is one of Australia s most widely applied taxes targeting business and consumers alike However while it has entered its second decade of administration corporate taxpayers are still making clerical mistakes to the tune of over 1 billion in the last three years alone These calculation errors translate into significant overpayments which the Federal government has set a four year time limit on reimbursement With tax enforcement becoming the new focus for the new government eager to return the federal budget to surplus these reimbursements for corporate Australia will have their own shelf life So how and why are Australian businesses literally giving their hard earned money to the Australian Taxation Office ATO and Federal Government without needing to The answer simply relates to the level of automation you use in the process of collecting collating and processing information needed to calculate the GST something that you would think that most Australian businesses would not be taking many risks with Why it never pays to be wrong Increased and increasing risks are exactly what Australian organisations are prepared to take by not addressing the benefits of automation for GST administration We have all seen it before Accounting has always been supplied with various spreadsheets from multiple other departments as that s the way it s always been done Each month every figure is laboriously entered manually by staff Rarely checked no time and no audit trail definitely no time but always in on time After all that s the most important thing right Wrong Australian business needs to acknowledge that taxation compliance and reporting is complex and becoming more complex With increased complexity comes increased risk A sure fire way of limiting your exposure to risk is to automate and validate your data which in real terms can potentially reduce error rates by up to 100 per cent Whilst this sounds like a common sense plan and also quite obvious there are one billion examples of why this is just not happening At a recent GST Reporting industry event the ATO put it on the public record that the integrity of business systems will form a key component of reviews for adequate tax risk management processes Those same attendees polled some interesting feedback on where they stand right now with major administration and reporting issues Data collection and analysis were the biggest challenges teams faced with monthly GST reporting and quarterly Business Activity Statements These respondents confirmed that they were extracting information from Enterprise Resource Planning systems and multiple manual Excel spreadsheets for GST report preparation The audience of GST reporting teams admitted that the collation calculation and reconciliation processes surrounding this primarily manual solution demanded multiple staff large time commitments and high levels of stress in lodging reports on time on a monthly basis For many organisations with the ATO advice on the integrity of the technology underpinning their business systems ringing in their ears they may have had cause to consider the future from a different

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/11/27/technology/technology-and-taxes-tough-nut-crack (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Peter Boyle | Business Spectator
    of financial numbers is needed to restore confidence Politics Australian Election Federal Budget International News Asia Europe USA National Affairs Latest stories Gagging visas are an attack on democracy The skyrocketing price of a journalist visa for Nauru will limit coverage of Australian prisoners on a vassal state It is an insult to the democratic principles this country stands for Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave The economic case for Scottish independence is far from settled with doubts hanging over volatile oil prices and uncertainty over future revenues One thing is certain it would be a disaster for Britain Technology NBN Buzz Mobility BYOD Smart Devices Emerging Tech Applications Big Data Cloud Computing Data Management Reviews Social Media Start ups Security Data Security Identity Management Wireless Security Telecommunication Latest stories Google v Facebook Who knows wins The unparalleled Google Analytics service means Google knows more about internet users than anyone else And runner up Facebook must go further to mine precious user insights if it wants to compete Will Twitter s founder strike social gold twice Biz Stone is looking to tap into the selflessness of others with his latest venture Jelly Enterprises But the just launched app will have to quickly shift into something of real value if it s to become a mainstream success Climate Carbon markets Energy markets Renewable energy Resources Solar energy Wind power CleanTech Science Environment Green Deals Policy Politics Smart Energy Latest stories Marking the milestones of 2013 Australia s transition to a clean energy economy took some political blows in 2013 but progress on the ground was heartening with energy efficiency solar and wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Peter Boyle Technology and taxes A tough nut to crack Corporate taxpayers are still making clerical mistakes on the GST to the tune of over 1 billion in the last three years Taxation compliance and reporting is hard work but it doesn t need to be by Peter Boyle 9 35am November 27 Search Markets Global Indices Index Last Chg Chg DOW JONES 16437 05 7 7 S P 500 1842 37 4 2 0 2 NASDAQ 4174 66 18 5 0 4 FTSE 100 6739 94 48 6 0 7 NIKKEI 15912 06 31 7 0 2 Hang Seng 22846 25 58 9 0 3 The Spectators

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/contributor/peter-boyle (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive