archive-au.com » AU » B » BUSINESSSPECTATOR.COM.AU

Total: 1320

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • 'Gagging visas' are an attack on democracy
    outside Broken Hill in western New South Wales which incidentally has twice the population of Nauru and then blame any problems on the local City Council Or better still move them to the sovereign principality of Hutt River 3 and blame everything on the ruling monarch Prince Leonard No Our prisoners are our affair It is bad enough the boats debate has been so blown out of proportion in Australia by both the Coalition and Labor in their race to the bottom on this issue Allowing an erosion of democracy by putting roadblocks in front of the fourth estate that exists to preserve that very democracy compounds the error While there is no evidence that Immigration Minister Scott Morrison was complicit in Nauru s decision it is certain that his department through its funding arrangements for Nauru s detention industry could exert enough pressure to overturn the gagging visas If their creation truly was for revenue reasons that extra revenue could easily be found But what will he do Likely nothing The political potency of refugee issues is wildly out of proportion to the impact boat arrivals have on the community Put another way boat arrivals in no way threaten the welfare of Australians they just offer an easy if unfounded way of whipping up fear in the community And politicians on both sides thrive on fear In the UK where the UK Independence Party has tapped xenophobic fears even more successfully than One Nation did in Australia in the late 1990s the refugee debate has taken some confusing turns recently UKIP leader Nigel Farage has in the past week voiced support for the resettlement of Syrians fleeing that nation s humanitarian crisis but fanned the flames of intolerance by calling for a five year moratorium on migration to Britain

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/print/765236 (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive


  • 'Gagging visas' are an attack on democracy | Business Spectator
    password It cannot go unremarked that Australia s harsh treatment of unauthorised boat arrivals is descending into an appalling state of secrecy the latest absurdity being the Nauru government s decision to hike visa fees for visiting journalists from 200 to 8000 The gagging visa was first uncovered by Global Mail photographer Mike Bowers whose publication quotes Nauru s Government Information Office Director Joanna Olsson as saying the move was for revenue purposes What else would it be for Well for increasing the deterrents to the Australian media documenting a shameful period of our history perhaps Whatever one thinks of the split between legitimate refugees and economic migrants in the boats that continue to make it to Australian territory there is no peace time precedent for an Australian government farming out this kind of decision making to an island nation of just over 9000 people and when questioned about policy replying This is a matter for the Government of Nauru The inmates on Nauru are Australia s prisoners The Nauru government is massively propped by up by Australian dollars These matters should be freely covered by Australian journalists In the interests of context readers may like to look for themselves at the island of Nauru through the satellite imagery available through Google Maps A few seconds are enough to remember that the sovereign nation is in fact a tiny convenient vassal state that has been central to a cynical manipulation of Australian voters by at least five governments both Coalition and Labor One might as well send detainees to a camp outside Broken Hill in western New South Wales which incidentally has twice the population of Nauru and then blame any problems on the local City Council Or better still move them to the sovereign principality of Hutt River and blame everything on the ruling monarch Prince Leonard No Our prisoners are our affair It is bad enough the boats debate has been so blown out of proportion in Australia by both the Coalition and Labor in their race to the bottom on this issue Allowing an erosion of democracy by putting roadblocks in front of the fourth estate that exists to preserve that very democracy compounds the error While there is no evidence that Immigration Minister Scott Morrison was complicit in Nauru s decision it is certain that his department through its funding arrangements for Nauru s detention industry could exert enough pressure to overturn the gagging visas If their creation truly was for revenue reasons that extra revenue could easily be found But what will he do Likely nothing The political potency of refugee issues is wildly out of proportion to the impact boat arrivals have on the community Put another way boat arrivals in no way threaten the welfare of Australians they just offer an easy if unfounded way of whipping up fear in the community And politicians on both sides thrive on fear In the UK where the UK Independence Party has tapped xenophobic fears even

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/9/politics/gagging-visas-are-attack-democracy?destination=node/765236 (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave
    finally begun to surface though an Alice in Wonderland quality still pervades the whole business The SNP has tried to reassure its electorate that by conceding that the Queen would remain Queen of Scotland and the pound would remain the currency Scots would even be permitted to remain loyal to the British Broadcasting Corporation No revolution then But some of the SNP s long held expectations have already been dismantled Initially Salmond was an enthusiast for Scottish membership of the euro Successive crises have changed all that even if staying with the sterling means setting interest rates in London The SNP assumed that an independent Scotland would be automatically welcomed into the EU Not so the Brussels bureaucrats have said An application to join as a new member would be required and it could easily fall victim of internal EU politics The Spanish might oppose Scotland s application so as to discourage independence movements in Catalonia and the Basque country The SNP proposes to join NATO which embraces nuclear weapons in its arsenal But the SNP rejects nuclear weapons and should they win would demand that the English remove the nuclear submarine base at Faslane in the Firth of Clyde at enormous cost No one has a plan to square this circle When the Irish wished to be free of England they were motivated by a powerful dislike of England and the English There are elements among the nationalists in Scotland who also feel strongly though never strongly enough to take to the streets as the Irish did at Easter 1916 But Scots tend to be more pragmatic and the question that dominates the referendum debate is about the economy will Scots in an independent Scotland be better or worse off At the moment a small majority thinks that Scotland would be worse off Women are more strongly against the proposal than men The SNP is a political coalition in which the most influential strain is Social Democratic Scottish university students pay no fees though the universities charge English students to study there Care for the elderly is free and the SNP promises more benefits post independence such as child care The cost of these welfare bonuses is met by funds from central government Public spending per head is significantly higher in Scotland 11 800 compared to 10 600 in Britain as a whole Salmond is sanguine about the economics of independence The cost will be met he states by income from North Sea oil Simple as that Oil taxes would provide 15 per cent of public spending in Scotland it stands at 1 6 per cent in the UK now A variety of economists conclude that in the short term the outlook for an independent Scotland would be tolerable Businessmen are not at all sure In the long term not only are we are all dead but oil prices move in unpredictable ways The price may rise over the years but the trend is downward It will be influenced

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/print/764846 (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Can Carney restore the BoE to its former glory? | Business Spectator
    know then that he is anxious to play the part Carney is a personable figure aged 48 he has good bones and well cut hair greying nicely at the sideburns He is fluent unapologetic and well aware that two essential attributes required of him are independence and authority Appearing recently before the Treasury Committee of the House of Commons he became quite cross when a Labour member suggested that he was too kind to the chancellor of the Exchequer more of a politician than a central banker said the MP Carney raised a thin smile at the inference that he has prejudiced his independence Of course not he said I m more than mildly offended by that suggestion The eminence of the governor in the City of London ought to be taken for granted For my first interview with a governor in the mid 1970s I felt I had to buy a new suit He was called Gordon Richardson until he became Lord Duntisbourne like all his successors he went on to the House of Lords An imposing figure he informed me that the office of governor commanded respect and goodwill It s true of prime ministers and Popes isn t it he said I checked I had not misheard him Not all his successors were quite so grand Robin Leigh Pemberton Lord Kingsdown who died last month was a bluff country squire during whose term the city of London was transformed by the Big Bang into a global market place and a man s word ceased to be his bond Sharks began to swim in his pond surrounded by shoals of lawyers He was followed by Eddie George Lord George an unpretentious and highly capable technician When Gordon Brown the new Labour chancellor announced in 1997 that the Bank would be empowered to set interest rates independent of the Treasury George looked this gift horse in the mouth and did not like what he saw The quid pro quo was that bank regulation was hived off to a separate organisation George thought that was unwise and he was proved right when the new scheme for regulating banks imploded shortly before his death in 2009 Next in line was Mervyn King Lord King He was an academic economist who delighted in the freedom to make monetary policy He also tended to ignore the banking system until he was forced to take part in the bailing out of a substantial part of it in 2008 King was a subtle operator in the arena of public power however and managed to win back for the Bank of England regulatory power over the banking system while retaining independence over monetary policy King s legacy is more power to the governor But the greed fuelled by an absence of fear among the bankers and splendid financiers during years of unregulated boom and dreadful bust had damaged the reputation of the Bank and the authority of the governor Its culture had become tired unresponsive and

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/12/10/economy/can-carney-restore-boe-its-former-glory (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ASHES: Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory | Business Spectator
    163 was a world record in Tests What then happened in Nottingham was that Brad Haddin thrashed England s bowlers in a second famous 10 th wicket stand this one was 65 with James Pattinson It took Australia to the brink of a famous victory The brink was not far enough At the very end of this Ashes series England almost snatched a win after a generous declaration by Michael Clarke almost awarded them a memorable but undeserved win The target was 227 in 44 overs and only bad light 21 short of a win stopped them their tracks England s administrators and radio commentators did not think this was the best of times at all they became hysterical about the injustice of it and demanded immediate changes in the ICC rules But the light would have deteriorated further in the time it would take to bowl the last four overs and even with the floodlights on no one has made a red ball that batsmen and fielders can see in the gloaming White balls are used only in floodlit one day cricket pink has been tried without success what about yellow The worst of times began at Lord s where Australia s performance with the bat in both innings 128 in the first and then 235 was utterly dismal A defeat by 347 runs seemed to confirm every prediction about the impotence of an Australian team Clarke and his players spent the rest of the summer trying to show that they were not as bad as they looked By the time they got to The Oval they had succeeded England won the Ashes because they played as if they expected to win Australia the reverse They lost their nerve at Lord s and in Durham where a run chase was going particularly well until Broad began an inspired spell and the Australia s collective nerve snapped As case of snatching defeat from the jaws of victory it was embarrassing to watch Statisticians looking at the averages will find the overall result hard to understand Three Australian batsmen averaged over 40 compared to only two for England The bad news for Australia was Ian Bell was odd man out averaging 62 44 with three hundreds two of them made England wins possible He was the player of the series Ryan Harris 24 wickets at 19 58 had the best bowling average by far Anderson 22 wickets at 29 59 Broad 22 at 27 45 and Swann 26 at 29 03 were more expensive but more effective England won 3 0 partly because of rain in Manchester and The Oval but principally because of performances by three match winning bowlers Jimmy Anderson took 10 for 158 in Nottingham Stuart Broad 11 for 121 in Durham and Graeme Swann 9 for 122 in the Lord s Test Apart from the bowling there were few memorable performances Big innings from Michael Clarke Shane Watson and Joe Root but only Root could claim to

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/27/ashes/ashes-snatching-defeat-jaws-victory (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • ASHES: A final fireworks display | Business Spectator
    rules of the game They must have been surprised to be called on to make the decision because they did not ask for a light meter until three overs from the end but they had reckoned without Kevin Pietersen who had played one of his most influential innings for England To explain how it came about it is necessary to go back to the start of the day It began half an hour late the outfield was still drying out and began modestly as England set about scoring the 46 runs required to save the follow on There was already speculation about declarations to make the last day entertaining for a near capacity crowd But when England batted on after making those 46 runs the general opinion was that since they were leading the series 3 0 England s stubborn professionalism would be offended by taking risks Bold batting by England s lower order had reduced Australia s lead to 115 when they were all out for 377 just after lunch The tail had been cleaned up by James Faulkner Australia s debutant who had commendable figures of 4 51 The crucial passage of play now began as Australia revealed their intentions at the start of their second innings Shane Watson was moved up the order to open with David Warner and straight away it was clear that the policy was to score as quickly as possible A declaration was on the cards At 44 for 2 the openers were gone but falling wickets were no worry Faulkner an experience one day cricketer coming in first wicket down made 22 from 22 balls Clarke himself batting more circumspectly than his colleagues made 28 as quickly as anyone Six wickets had fallen for 111 at tea with Broad leaving his mark with 4 for 43 Clarke decided the lead of 228 was competitive and jogged across to England s dressing room to say he had declared If it was generous it was because experience would have favoured England to score 228 rather than Australia to take 10 wickets England s openers did not dawdle Indeed Joe Root was out after slashing at a short ball outside his off stump Alastair Cook was joined by Jonathan Trott and these two out of form batsmen proceeded to play themselves back into form Trott was the most dashing of the two and together they took the score to 66 for 2 when Faulkner had Cook lbw This was not necessarily good news however because it brought Pietersen to the crease During the 2010 11 Ashes series the Australian dressing room came to fear the domination exercised by Pietersen His performances this English summer have been more modest but there was nothing modest in the way he laid about Australia s bowlers He stands tall at the crease and when the mood takes him he treats all the bowlers equally with the same contempt He was in the mood And the boundaries flowed hit hard

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2013/8/26/ashes/ashes-final-fireworks-display (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Britain will be poorer for Scotland the brave | Business Spectator
    that the Queen would remain Queen of Scotland and the pound would remain the currency Scots would even be permitted to remain loyal to the British Broadcasting Corporation No revolution then But some of the SNP s long held expectations have already been dismantled Initially Salmond was an enthusiast for Scottish membership of the euro Successive crises have changed all that even if staying with the sterling means setting interest rates in London The SNP assumed that an independent Scotland would be automatically welcomed into the EU Not so the Brussels bureaucrats have said An application to join as a new member would be required and it could easily fall victim of internal EU politics The Spanish might oppose Scotland s application so as to discourage independence movements in Catalonia and the Basque country The SNP proposes to join NATO which embraces nuclear weapons in its arsenal But the SNP rejects nuclear weapons and should they win would demand that the English remove the nuclear submarine base at Faslane in the Firth of Clyde at enormous cost No one has a plan to square this circle When the Irish wished to be free of England they were motivated by a powerful dislike of England and the English There are elements among the nationalists in Scotland who also feel strongly though never strongly enough to take to the streets as the Irish did at Easter 1916 But Scots tend to be more pragmatic and the question that dominates the referendum debate is about the economy will Scots in an independent Scotland be better or worse off At the moment a small majority thinks that Scotland would be worse off Women are more strongly against the proposal than men The SNP is a political coalition in which the most influential strain is Social Democratic Scottish university students pay no fees though the universities charge English students to study there Care for the elderly is free and the SNP promises more benefits post independence such as child care The cost of these welfare bonuses is met by funds from central government Public spending per head is significantly higher in Scotland 11 800 compared to 10 600 in Britain as a whole Salmond is sanguine about the economics of independence The cost will be met he states by income from North Sea oil Simple as that Oil taxes would provide 15 per cent of public spending in Scotland it stands at 1 6 per cent in the UK now A variety of economists conclude that in the short term the outlook for an independent Scotland would be tolerable Businessmen are not at all sure In the long term not only are we are all dead but oil prices move in unpredictable ways The price may rise over the years but the trend is downward It will be influenced by two factors One is the difficult and expensive drilling operations in the North Sea the second is the impact of cheaper oil from fracking in the US on world prices Uncertainty about future revenues would no doubt influence the cost of borrowing in international debt markets Dependence on a single commodity means the Scots would be charged higher interest rates than developed economies such as England The English who have taken no more than a desultory interest in the debate so far are now waking up If Scotland were independent the rest of the British economy would drop from 7 th among the world s trading nations to 13 th Transition negotiations would inevitably be a treacherous drawn out business spreading uncertainty at a time when Britain will also be contemplating its future membership of the EU In a Financial Times survey published in the New Year 27 out of 31 British economists questioned said that a yes vote would be disastrous for the UK as a whole not just for Scotland Prime Minister David Cameron our Panjandrum of public relations tells us that the economic case against independence has been made But hearts have still to be won He is right to take nothing for granted There is still time for a romantic rediscovery of the idea of independence in Scotland The Irish in me would applaud but the English bit would certainly regret it Print this page More from Stephen Fay 10 Dec Can Carney restore the BoE to its former glory 06 Nov An enigma wrapped in a puzzle wrapped in gold 07 Oct Letter from a worried London 27 Aug ASHES Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory 26 Aug ASHES A final fireworks display Related articles 10 Jan EU approves Snowden hearing 06 Jan Merkel injured skiing 17 Dec Britain approves banking reforms 17 Dec Germany s coalition deal signed 15 Dec Merkel coalition gets key vote More from Business Spectator Technology Adapt or die Commercial The Future of Energy Family Business Alan Kohler s Family Business China China Spectator Please log in or register to post comments Comments on this article Comments Policy Robin Bruce Thu 2014 01 09 09 27 The spirit of this article is decent enough but there are some inaccuracies SNP have had Westminster MPs since 1967 not 1973 as the article suggests SNP came to power in Scotland in 2007 not 2011 The article seems to imply that a nuclear arsenal is a prerequisite for NATO membership In fact of 28 members 3 are nuclear powers and only a further 5 host weapons for the US The article suggests that Scotland s EU membership is seriously in doubt threatened by the Spanish whereas in fact Spain have been clear that they have no objection to Scotland s independence provided it is agreed to by the UK state in a constitutional manner which it is thanks to the Edinburgh Agreement promising to respect the referendum result which has royal assent As to trying to divine the future based on the majority view of economists surely you are old enough to know better than that It

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/article/2014/1/9/europe/britain-will-be-poorer-scotland-brave?destination=node/764846 (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Apple signs long-awaited iPhone deal with China Mobile | Business Spectator
    wind all providing tangible proof of their future potential A fifth year of declining power consumption Power consumption fell again in 2013 dipping 2 8 per cent across the National Electricity Market as scheduled renewables rose to 12 per cent of the market Industries Advertising and Marketing Agribusiness Automotive Aviation Construction and Engineering Education Family Business Financial Services Food and Beverages Gaming and Racing Health and Pharmaceuticals HR Industrial relations Information Technology Infrastructure Insurance Manufacturing Media and Digital Resources and Energy Professional Services Property Retail Small Business SME Telecommunications The Ashes Tourism Transport and Logistics Video KGB TV China Spectator CEO Hub Leadership Lab Management Insights Young Leaders Knowledge Centre Adapt or Die Knowledge Hub Business Accelerators Webinars eBooks Menu Apple signs long awaited iPhone deal with China Mobile Reuters 24 Dec 2013 8 12 AM Technology Mobility Tie up provides much needed boost for tech giant in the second largest smartphone market in the world You must be logged in to read this article Not a member yet Register today Business Spectator is available on all of your devices so you can access the latest news and commentary where and how you like Register now Already a member Sign in here Email Address Enter your Email Address Password Enter the password that accompanies your Email Address Remember me Log in Request new password Apple has signed a long awaited agreement with China Mobile Ltd to sell iPhones through the world s biggest network of mobile phone users In a deal that could add billions of dollars to its revenue Apple said its smartphones will be available to China Mobile customers starting January 17 Pricing and availability details for the iPhone 5S and 5C lines will be disclosed at a later date it said in a statement China Mobile which has about 760 million customers will begin registering orders for iPhone from December 25 the company said on its account on the Sina Weibo micro blogging service The tie up provides a much needed boost for Apple in a country where it s trailing rivals even though China is its second largest market after the US It will also give Apple extra firepower in its intensifying global competition with South Korea s Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Apple didn t disclose financial terms of the agreement Tim Cook Apple s chief executive said in its statement that China is an extremely important market for the Cupertino based company In a country where smartphone sales are booming Apple has trailed its competitors Shipments of iPhones in the country grew 32 percent year on year for the third quarter about half of China s Lenovo Group Ltd which had the next slowest growth at 64 percent year on year Samsung battle China Mobile could gain 17 million new iPhone activations in 2014 alone according to research firm Forrester more than the 16 8 million iPhones Apple sold in mainland China for the 12 months ended September according to Forrester data But after an

    Original URL path: http://www.businessspectator.com.au/news/2013/12/24/technology/apple-signs-long-awaited-iphone-deal-china-mobile (2014-01-12)
    Open archived version from archive